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STARS AND SEXTANTS 



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SEXTANTS 



STAR DISTANCE TABLES 

FOR FACILITATING THE USE OF 

LORD ELLENBOROUGH'S METHOD OF CORRECTING THE 

CENTRING AND TOTAL ERRORS OF 

SEXTANTS AT SEA 



BY 

JOHN ABNER SPRIGGE 

WM. ERASER DOAK, M.A., E.R.A.S. 

T. CHARLTON HUDSON, B.A., E.R.A.S. 

OF H.M. NAUTICAL ALMANAC OFFICE, ADMIRALTY, 
AND 

ARTHUR S. COX, B.Sc, A.R.C.Sc. 



LONDON : 
PUBLISHED BY J. D. POTTER 

Admiralty Agent for Charts 
I4S MINORIES, AND ii KING STREET, TOWER HILL. E.G. 

1903 

Price Two Shillings and Sixpence 



S7U 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

Preface ----_.-- vii 

Introduction -.___.- ix 

Description of Tables ------ xiii 

Rules and Examples ■ - - - - - xv 

Ephemeris -------- I 

Star Distances ------- 24 

Ex-Meridian Star Pairs - - - ■■ - 33 

Semidiurnal Arcs ...... ^2 

Astronomical Refraction . . - . - 46 

The Stars, Notes on - - - - - - 50 



9382(1« 



PREFACE. 



" Stars and Sextants " contains the necessary and sufficient material for 
determining, and determining with ease, the centring and total errors of a Sextant 
at sea. 

It gives, for that purpose, all the angular distances between stars of the 2nd 
magnitude, or brighter, that are suitable for observation with a Sextant. 

Hitherto the method of correcting Sextant errors by observation of Star Dis- 
tances has been considered impracticable on account of the really complicated 
nature of an apparently simple problem. The complications are due to refraction 
and aberration, the latter being a source of error which has hitherto been quite 
neglected in practice, and has not even been exhaustively dealt with in theory. 

In the present new and simple method these complications are avoided by — 

(i) Choosing^ for the suitable time of observation, the time ivhen the stars are 
on the same vertical great circle. 
In this case the refraction difficulty becomes simplified to mere 
addition and subtraction. This elegant simplification is due to 
Lord Ellenborough. 

(2) Making it practicable to ascertain this time. 

Thus, when two stars are on the same vertical great circle, the twc 
imaginary stars 90° from each of them are obviously somewhere 
on the true horizon, one rising and the other setting. We therefore 
give data for determining with ease the time of rising of the 
proper " fictitious " star, a well-known and simple problem. 

{3) Restricting the selection of pairs of stars to tlie time of year zvhen their 
respective distances are practically utiaffected by aberration. 
For every pair of stars there are two instants in the year when 
aberration has no effect on the distance between them. Near 
these dates the effect is small, and in proportion to the nearness ; 
and for a week on either side the effect is negligible. We have 
found these dates, and have classified the star pairs accordingly 
in the Ephemeris. 

When no great accuracy is required, the distances as given in the Star Distance 
Section may be used at any time throughout the year ; but when a higher degree of 
accuracy is considered desirable, the best pairs of stars to use on any day may be 
ascertained from the Ephemeris. 

An important section of the book is the list of eighteen specially favourable star 



viii PREFACE. 

pairs, the distances of which are given for every ten days throughout the year. 
They are certain to be found eminently serviceable by the traveller, the explorer, 
and the trigonometrical surveyor, as well as by the navigator for whom they are 
j)rimarily intended. 

It is to be hoped that this little treatise will be found a help in time of need by 
all who go down to the sea in ships, and that they will be enabled by its aid to do 
readily what has been regarded as for them impossible, viz., find the centring 
and total errors of their Sextants. The subject of centring error is one that has 
been too long neglected in actual practice : it deserves, on the contrary, the close 
attention of every careful navigator. So long, too, as the Sextant is used on board 
ship, it ought to be above reproach and as perfect as possible. 

We leave the Introduction, with the explanation of the principles involved, and a 
description of the Tables and their use, to Lord EUenborough, whose experience in 
the departments both of navigation and of nautical astronomy qualifies him to write 
on a matter to which he has devoted much thought, and to express opinions that he 
has verified by numerous observations. 

THE AUTHORS. 

November 1903. 



INTRODUCTION. 



TABLES 



For facilitating the use of Lord Ellenborough's method of finding the 
centring and total errors of Sextants at sea, by Messrs Sprigge, 
DOAK, and Hudson, of H.M. Nautical Almanac Office, and Mr Cox. 

Strange to say, though compasses are constantly being corrected both at sea and 
in harbour, and chronometers are perpetually being rated and checked by means of 
the sextant at sea, when passing well-known points of land, and also when in har- 
bour, not one sextant in a thousand is ever completely corrected when once in the 
hands of the seaman. Yet it is as liable to accident as any other instrument. 

The navigator can find the index error, but the centring error has hitherto 
been a mystery to him. If he has been wise enough to buy a sextant with a Kew 
certificate, that certificate cannot be permanently relied on. However careful he 
may be, he can never be absolutely certain that his sextant may not have received 
some injury. 

The Admiralty do not permit a naval cadet to bring a sextant on board the 
" Britannia " unless it is provided with an " A " certificate from Kew. Besides 
other things, an " A " certificate means that the centring error is less than one 
minute. But what its centring error may have been at Kew, is no criterion as to 
what its centring error may be five years later. Who would think of buying a 
horse on the strength of a veterinary certificate given five years previously ? 

If the centring error of a sextant exceeds three minutes it is altogether rejected 
at Kew. It should be remembered, moreover, that the error due to three minutes, 
when occurring both in the sights taken at or near noon and also in those taken for 
longitude, may very frequently make a difference of ten miles in the supposed 
position of the ship. 

The centring error of some sextants is considerable. In Staff Commander 
Martin's " Navigation," a sextant is referred to which was in actual use, whose 
centring error varied from nothing to ten minutes. Fifteen per cent, of the sextants 
rejected at Kew during "the years 1897, 1899, and 1900 were rejected on account 
of excessive error, or for other reasons." In the year 1900, 813 sextants were ex- 
amined and 122 were rejected. Most of these sextants, with a possible three 
minute error, are probably now at sea, doubdess sold for a lower price than they 
would have fetched had they been able to obtain a proper certificate. Then, there 
are a number of sextants used in navigation that have never been near Kew. 

Horizons are sometimes unreliable, but that is no reason why a sextant error 
should be added to an horizon error. At any rate, I do not suppose that any seaman 



X INTRODUCTION. 

would venture to assert that a sextant can be too accurate, when employed for the 
purpose of finding the error and rate of a chronometer, by means of the artificial 
horizon. Opportunities for equal altitudes whereby the errors of the sextant are 
eliminated, do not occur as frequently as those for single altitudes. Surveying 
vessels may be able to stop in harbour until they obtain them. Other vessels 
cannot do so, and have often to rely on sets of single altitudes. 

There is, however, one method of finding the error of a sextant when at sea, 
which is mentioned in some works on navigation. If the angular distance between 
two stars is observed and corrected for refraction, by means of a calculation 
similar to that of a lunar, the difference between the distance so corrected for 
refraction, and the true angular distance, will give the total error of the sextant. 
By applying the index error to this total error, the centring error can be found 
separately if it is desired to do so. 

Now this method of correcting for refraction is so long and complicated, that 
I never heard of anyone who had actually used it. The late Captain S. F. R. 
Lecky, the well-known writer on navigation, describes it as "beyond the power 
of the navigator," and advises seamen to send their sextants to Kew to be corrected. 
The fee is six shillings, which must be sent with the sextant. 

Two years ago, however, while watching the stars, I hit on a method which 
reduced this correction for refraction to simplicity itself. By restricting the 
observation to stars in line with the Zenith, i.e., on the same Great Circle of 
altitude, these complicated calculations are reduced to simple addition and 
subtraction, and can be worked out in a minute or two. The two spherical 
triangles with a common angle disappear, and the whole of the work is done on 
a single line, a part of a Great Circle, just as in the case of a meridian altitude. 

This corrected distance has to be compared with the actual or computed distance. 
Now this second computation is not beyond the powers of many navigators. But 
its calculation to seconds is outside the experience of by far the larger number 
of seamen actually employed in the navigation of British vessels. Even those 
who can calculate it, cannot wish to be wasting their time in calculation and 
recalculation of the angular distances of fixed stars. This can be very much better 
done, and more accurately done, once for all by practised astronomers on dry land. 
Lord Kelvin, who has done more for navigation than any other living man, has 
kindly given me permission to publish a letter he wrote to me on this point. 

Netherhall, Largs, 
Ayrshire, December 4, 1902. 

Dear Lord Ellenhorough, — INLiny thanks for your letter of November 30, 

and enclosed report of your speech in the House of Lords on correction of 

sextants, which I have read with much interest. I believe the addition to the 

Nautical Almanac which you ask for would be found valuable by many careful 

and zealous navigators. I quite agree with you that those who do take angular 

distances between pairs of stars nearly in a line with the Zenith, for the purpose 

of determining the errors of their sextants, ought to be spared the waste of time 

in making calculations, which can be "better dune once for all by a single 

computer on dry land." — Yours truly, 

(Signed) Kelvin. 



INTRODUCTION. xi 

It is clear, however, that my method will never come into general use afloat 
on board the class of vessels that are most in want of it, unless tables are published 
giving the angular distances of pairs of stars. This, I am glad to say, has now been 
undertaken by Messrs Sprigge, Doak, and Hudson, of H.M. Nautical Almanac Office, 
and Mr Cox. 

These gentlemen, whose official position and experience in calculation ensure 
the accuracy of the Tables, have considerably improved on my original idea 
by adding some auxiliary data and tables, which enable the seaman to ascertain 
at what time certain pairs of stars are available. The navigator is thus relieved 
from the necessity of having to remain on deck watching the stars, and of trusting 
to the eye alone. 

The only Table of Star Distances in existence is one calculated for twenty-seven 
pairs of stars, by the late Admiral Sir Charles Shadwell. I once had the honour of 
serving under him, and learnt a great deal from him. These pairs of stars were, 
however, not selected for the purpose of correcting sextants, but for finding the 
latitude by a method now obsolete. The last edition appeared in 1870. 

There is no other known means of ascertaining the centring and total errors of 
a sextant when at sea, than the one I have mentioned, namely by angular distance 
of stars. 

Formerly, a navigator who had the misfortune to have a sextant out of order, 
had to bring his ship home with a faulty sextant as best he could, perhaps from 
China or Australia, and run the risk of shipwreck on his way. In future, however, 
if he is provided with Messrs Sprigge, Doak, Hudson, and Cox's Tables, he can find 
his error at all angles on any starlight night. Next to being out of order, the worst 
thing that can happen to a sextant is for its owner to believe it out of order, and 
to consider it unreliable. He will probably make as bad a passage as the owner 
of the damaged sextant. Both will make bad landfalls, and in consequence lose 
time and burn more coal, a point to which I particularly wish to call the attention 
of shipowners. 

The new method, accompanied by these tables, brings the " test for centring error 
zuell within the power of every navigator," and I hope that in time to come a 
sextant will be considered as incomplete when unaccompanied by the latest copy 
of these Tables, as it is now when without a Kew certificate. 

ELLENBOROUGH, 

Commander, Royal Navy 

(Retired). 

P.S. — Since going to press, my attention has been called to the article on the 
"Sextant," which is to be found at pages 26 and 27 of "Notes bearing on the 
Navigation of H.M. Ships," published by the Hydrographic Office, Admiralty. 

It lays great stress on the importance of attending to the centring error of 
Sextants. I have, in consequence, reprinted the whole of it, as I can give no 
stronger proof of the necessity for these Tables. 



( xii ) 

EXTRACT FROM 

*' NOTES BEARING ON THE NAVIGATION OF 

H.M. SHIPS" 

As printed for the Admiralty ffydrographic Office {pages 26 arid 2/). 

SEXTANT. 

Centring Error. — This important error of a sextant is much neglected. 

Under this name are generally included all errors arising from the following : — 
Eccentricity of the centre of the axis of the radius arm and the centre 

of the arc. 
Faulty graduation. 

Flexure of the frame of the instrument caused by varying temperature, 
or accidental blows. 

These combine to make all angles measured with a sextant more or less errone- 
ous, after the Index Error has been applied. The error may be small and unim- 
portant. In a first-class instrument in perfect order it may not amount in any part 
of the arc to more than 10 seconds. On the other hand, in an inferior instrument, 
and after careless treatment, it may be as much as two or three minutes. 

It is evident that this error, if unknown, may seriously affect the result of observa- 
tions, especially those for time or longitude, and hence the necessity, when any 
accuracy is required, of observing in such a manner as to eliminate its effects. 

For instance, if the error of a chronometer is obtained from sights on one 
side of the meridian alone, the result with a bad sextant may be several 
seconds in error. By taking equal altitudes, or by taking another set of single 
sights on the other side of the meridian (and in the latter case meaning the 
result of forenoon and afternoon sights), the effect of this error is eliminated, 
as the instrumental error has an opposite effect in the afternoon to that in the 
forenoon, and hence the result is correct, no matter what the amount of 
instrumental error may be. 

In obtaining latitude by the sun, the error cannot be got rid of, unless the 
sun is high enough to permit its altitude to be taken to the opposite side of 
the horizon. For navigational purposes, however, the effect on latitude or 
longitude obtained at sea is not important, as it only affects that particular day, 
and is not cumulative. 

It is otherwise with shore observations for rating a chronometer, which will 
be dealt with under " Rating." 

The centring error is not easy to ascertain. It can be determined at Kew 
Observatory, where apparatus exists for the purpose, but the navigator can only 
find it by a series of artificial horizon observations in the following manner : — 

Observe stars of nearly equal altitudes north and south of the zenith. Half 
the difference of the latitudes resulting from each star will be the centring error 
for that altitude. The correction will be minus if the latitude from the star on 
the polar side of the observer is greater than that from the star on the equatorial 
side, and plus if vice versa. 

As the centring error varies on different parts of the arc, and generally 
increases as the angle measured increases, it requires a considerable number of 
observations to determine it satisfactorily. 



( xHi ) 



DESCRIPTION OF TABLES. 



These tables give the angular distances between pairs of stars of the ist and 
2nd magnitudes, all of which are available for correcting sextants. 

In consequence of aberration, the angular distance of some pairs of stars may 
vary as much as 35" + or 35"-, during the course of the year. 

If a sextant has met with an accident, and it is necessary to correct it immediately, 
any pair of stars to be found in the tables, at any time of year, will give the 
navigator the total error within 35", that is, within a little more than half a minute. 
This will enable him to bring his ship safely into harbour. 

But if the seaman or the explorer wishes for greater accuracy, then he must note 
the time of the year, and only make use of stars within the limits laid down in the 
Ephemeris. The error due to aberration will, in that case, be always under 10". 
For the purpose of rating chronometers with the artificial horizon, I do not think 
that sextants can be too accurate, especially as the mariner has often to rely on sets 
of single altitudes which do not eliminate the error due to the sextant. 

The time for taking the observation can generally be found by the eye, and by 
noting when the sextant is held perpendicularly in the hand. It is, however, better 
to look up the hour and approximate minute in the tables, where the position of an 
imaginary or " fictitious star " is laid down. This fictitious star is a pole of the 
Great Circle that the pair of stars are on, and when it is rising, the stars are in 
position. It may also happen (though not so frequently) that the stars are again in 
position when the " fictitious star " is setting. 

The tables for refraction will be found more accurate and convenient than 
those now in use, as the corrections for barometer and thermometer are combined 
in one table. The arguments are apparent altitude and {Bar. (in.) — yV Therm, 
(deg. Fahr.) }. 

Suppose Alt. 27°, Bar. 29 in.. Therm. 60° F, 

29- Jjj (60) =29-6 = 23 : then 27° and 23 give refraction i' 48". 
Suppose Alt. 45°, Bar. 30 in., Therm. 80° F. 

30 - y^j (80) = 30 - 8 = 22 : then 45° and 22 give refraction o' 53". 

The table of semidiurnal arcs is an extension and a simplification of the tables of 
time amplitudes, that are used for the purpose of ascertaining the time of the rising 
and of the setting of the sun. It gives the hour angle of the "fictitious star," when 
it is on the horizon, at one inspection and without calculation. 

This table can also be used for finding the hour angle of any heavenly body when 
it is rising or setting. For instance, it gives the apparent time of sunset without any 
calculation. If the time of sunrise is required, subtract the time given from twelve 
hours. 



xiv DESCRIPTION OF TABLES. 

When the sum of the latitude of the place, and of the declination of any real or 
fictitious star, exceeds 90", then if their names are alike^ the star will be circumpolar, 
and will not touch the horizon. If their names are unlike^ it will not rise. The 
pairs corresponding to such fictitious stars cannot therefore be made use of in the 
latitude of the observer. 

In practice, I have found that better contacts can be made with stars of about 
the same magnitude. Sirius and Canopus are too bright, whilst a Centauri, Procyon, 
and Arcturus have too large a proper motion. These five stars, therefore, have 
been intentionally omitted from these tables as being unsuitable for sextant 
observations. 

As Capella and Rigel and a few other pairs of stars are on the meridian, or 
nearly so, when on a great circle of altitude, they are specially suitable for observa- 
tion when in a close harbour. The latitude being known, the altitudes can be 
easily calculated. In their case no fictitious star is required. The time at which 
they are on the meridian should be found in the usual manner. When at sea, if the 
altitudes are taken, the latitude can be deduced from them if there is a good 
horizon. 

As it is thought that these pairs of ex-meridian stars may be specially useful to 
surveyors or explorers, eighteen pairs of them have been placed in a separate table, 
and their distances have been calculated for every ten days. In the course of the 
year these star pairs will obviously be unavailable on certain dates owing to sunlight, 
but the determination of these may safely be left to the observer. 

Whether above or below the Pole, the altitude of the Pole Star cannot change 
more than 5''5 as long as it is within one hour and a half of the meridian ; and if 
the altitude of the Pole Star is not less than 15°, a difference of 5'"5 will only affect 
the refraction to the extent of i". For these reasons, in the composition of this 
table, a freer use has been made of the Pole Star than of other stars. 

The time at which the star paired with the Pole Star passes the meridian should 
be computed, and then, for the purposes of this observation, the Pole Star can be 
treated as if on the meridian. For instance, Spica is on the meridian within four 
minutes of the time that the Pole Star crosses the meridian below the Pole. 

It is intended to revise the tables every five years or so. 

ELLENBOROUGH, 

Commander, Royal Navy 
(Retired). 



( XV ) 

RULES FOR USING THE TABLES. 

I. Choice of Pairs. 

Refer to the Ephenieris for the date, and choose a pair or pairs given within 

7 days before ) , , 

' , - Vthat date, and 

7 days after j 

consult the visible stars to make sure that they can be observed. If it is desired to 

check particular angles on the sextant, select pairs as near them as possible. 

II. Data from Tables. 

P'or any pair selected, turn up the Star Distance Table, by means of the page 
reference, and take out — 

Distance. 

R.A. and Dec. of Fictitious Star. 
With the declination of the Fictitious Star and the latitude of ship, take out also 
the semidiurnal arc from the table on pages 42-45. 

III. Time of Observation. 

Subtract the semidiurnal arc from the R.x\. of the Fictitious Star, to obtain the 
R.A. of meridian at observation. From this (adding 24^' if necessary) take the 
Sun's R.A. at preceding Greenwich Apparent Noon {Nautical Almanac, page I of 
the month). The result is the rough ship apparent time of observation. 

If the time of observation is required to be within four minutes, apply 
to it the longitude in time ( + W, - E), and find the corresponding change 
in the Sun's R.A., which is to be subtracted from the rough time to get 
the correct ship apparent ti?ne of observation. 

The time may be checked by means of Davis and Burdwood's "Sun and 
Star Azimuth Tables," or by corrected compass bearings. The azimuths 
of the two stars of the pair for the time of observation should either be 
the same or differ by 180°, according as the stars are on the same or 
opposite sides of the Zenith. 

IV. Sextant Observation. 

Set the sextant within a minute or two of the tabular distance. Take the distance 
and the altitudes of the two stars. Altitudes below 15° are not recommended. 

If time presses, the altitude of one star is sufficient, for if the Zenith is 
between the stars, 1 80° - (altitude + distance) = altitude of other star. If 
both stars are on the same side of the Zenith, then (distance + altitude 
of lower star) = altitude of upper star. 

V. True Sextant Distance. 

Take out the refractions (pages 46-49), and add their difference to the observed 
distance if both stars are on the same side of the Zenith, and their sum if the 
Zenith is between the stars. The result is the true sextant distance. Its difference 
from the distance tabulated herein is the total error, i.e., the sum of the index and 
centring errors. 

The arguments for the Refraction Table are : — 

(i) Barometer reading in inches, less one-tenth of the thermometer 

reading in degrees Fahrenheit. 
(2) Observed altitude. 



XVI 



RULES FOR USING THE TABLES. 



EXAMPLES. 



A.— ZENITH BETWEEN STARS. 

On December 2, in latitude about 48' 35' N., longitude about i'' 57"' \V., to 
find the Centring Error at 72°. 

Index Error, - i' 30". 
IJarometer, 30 in. 
Thermometer, 45° F. 
Height above sea-level, 16 ft. 



Take from Tables. 
(Dec. 5): a Ursae Minoris {Po/aris) and a Tauri [Aldebaran). 

(Pa-e "4)1 ^^'^^^'^"ce, 72° 5 1' 23". 

'^ \ Fictitious star, R.A., 10'' 31'", Dec, \ N. 

(Page 42) Semidiurnal arc, 6'' 5'". 



R.A. Fictitious Star 
Semidiurnal Arc • 



10' 
6 



5 



Diff. = R.A. of meridian at 

observation ■ - 4 26 

Sun's R.A. • ■ ■ 16 33 



Diff. ^ Rough apparent time 

ship for observation - 11'' 53' 



Rough time • 11'' 53' 

Longitude - + i 57 



Sum - - - 13 50 
Correction to time 

(change in R.A.) - 2 
Correct A.T.S. 

for observation 11'' 51"' 



Polaris. Aldeharaii. 

Observed altitude 49° 30' o" 57° 53' o" 
Index correction - - i 30 - i 30 



Observed distance 72° 52' 24" 
Sum of refractions i 28 



Dip 



• • , Sum - - 72 53 52 

49 28 30 S7 51 30 I T->- ^ -^11 

^^ '^ J/ J o I Distance ni table 72 51 23 

40 40 



Corrected altitude 49 24 30 57 47 30 
Refraction - - 51" 37" 



Sum of refractions 



i' 28" 



Total error at 72° 
Index error 

Centring error 



o 59 



RULES FOR USING THE TABLES. 



XVII 



EXAMPLES. 



B.— BOTH STARS ON THE SAME SIDE OF THE ZENITH. 

On December 7, in latitude about 20° 39' S., longitude about o'' 47'" E., to find 
the Centring Error at 27'. 

Index error, - l' 20". 
Barometer, 29 in. 
Thermometer, 70° F. 
Height above sea-level, 16 ft. 



Take from Tables. 

(Dec. 3) : a Tauri {Aldebara7i) and y8 Orionis {Rigel). 

,p V ( Distance, 26' 29' 54". 

\ age 25; <j p-^ji^jQ^g g^^^^ ^j^^ jQh ggm^ Dec., 22° N. 

(Page 45) Semidiurnal arc, 5^^ 25™. 




xviii RULES FOR USING THE TABLES. 



REGIES POUR L'USAGE DES TABLES. 



I. Pour choisir les paires d'fetoiles. 

Prendre des ephemerides une paire d'etoiles donnee entre la periode de sept 
jours avant et sept jours apres la date, la paire devant etre visible de la position ou 
se trouve le navire. Si Ton veut verifier certains angles du sextant, choisir une 
paire d'etoiles aussi pres que possible de Tangle du sextant a verifier. 

II. Pour prendre les donndes des Tables. 

Pour la paire d'etoiles choisie, chercher dans "Star Distance Table" avec I'aide 
de la reference des pages, et prendre — 

Distance. 

Ascension droite et declinaison de I'etoile Active ("Fictitious Star"). 

Avec la declinaison de I'etoile Active et la latitude du navire prendre aussi Tare 
semi-diurne de la table se trouvant aux pages 42-45. 

III. Pour trouver le temps d'Observation. 

Soustraire Tare semi-diurne de I'ascension droite de I'etoile Active pour obtenir 
I'ascension droite du nieridien a Tobservation. 

De cela prendre I'ascension droite du soleil au precedent midi du temps 
apparent de Paris (Connaissance des Temps). 

Le resultat est le temps apparent approximatif du navire ou se fait I'observation. 

Si le temps d'observation est desire en moins de quatre minutes, 
ajouter au temps approximatif trouve le temps de longitude ( + O, - E), et 
trouver le change correspondant dans I'ascension droite du soleil, lequel 
est a soustraire du temps approximatif pour obtenir le temps apparent 
corrige du navire au moment de I'observation. 

Le temps peut etre verifie au moyen de Davis et P)urdwood's "Sun 
and Star Azimuth Tables" ou par le relevement corrige du compas. 
L'azimuth des deux etoiles de la paire au temps d'observation doit etre la 
meme ou differer de 180 degrcs suivant que les etoiles sont du rneme ou 
du cote oppose du Zenith. 

IV. Observation par le Sextant. 

Ajuster le sextant a Tangle donnc pour la paire d'etoiles. Prendre la distance 



RULES FOR USING THE TABLES. xix 

et les hauteurs des deux ctoiles. Les hauteurs en dessous de 15" nc sont pas 
reconimandees. 

Si le temps pour faire I'observation manque, la hauteur d'une etoile 
suffit ; parceque si le Zenith est entre les deux etoiles, 180° - (hauteur 
+ distance) = la hauteur de I'autre etoile : si les etoiles sont du meme 
cute du Zenith, distance + hauteur de la plus basse etoile = la hauteur 
de la plus haute etoile. 

V. Distance par le Sextant. 

Prendre les refractions des deux etoiles de la table et aj outer leur difference a la 
distance observee si les deux etoiles sont du meme cote du Zenith et leur total si 
le Zenith est entre les deux etoiles. Le resultat est la distance vraie par le sextant. 
La difference entre cette distance et celle de la table est I'erreur totale, i.e., la somme 
des erreurs de coUimation et de I'eccentricite. 



XX 



RULES FOR USING THE TABLES. 



EXEMPLES. 



A.— LE ZENITH ENTRE LES DEUX ETOILES. 

Le 2 Decembre a la latitude 48" 35' N., a peu pres, et a la longitude 2'' 6'" O., a 
peu pres, trouver I'erreur d'eccentricite a 72^ 

Erreur de collimation, - i' 30", 
Baromelre, 0"762™. 
Thermometre, +7°'2 Centigrade. 
Elevation de I'oeil, 4'" '9. 



Prendre des Tables. 
(Le 5 Decembre) : a Ursse Minoris {Po/aris) et a Tauri {Aldebaran). 

i-ii , \ f Distance, 72° 51' 23". 

\ age 24; I ^^^.^^ fictive, R.A., lo^^ 31'", Dec, i'' N. 

(Page 42) Arc semi-diurne, 6'' 5'". 



Ascension droite de I'etoile 

fictive - - - - 10'' 31'" 
Arc semi-diurne - - - 6 5 


Temps approximatif 11'' 53"' 
Longitude - -t- 2 6 

Somme - - 13 59 
Correction au 

temps (change 

de Tascension 

droite) - - - 2 
Temps apparent 

corrigedu navire 

a I'instant de 

I'observation - 11'' 5 1'" 


Difference = Ascension droite 

du meridien - - - 4 26 
Ascension droite du soleil - 16 T)?) 


Difference = Temps apparent 
approximatif du navire a 
I'instant de I'observation - 11'' 53™ 


Polaris. Aldebaran. 

Hauteur observee 49° 30' 0" 57° 53' 0" 
Erreur de colli- 
mation - - - I 30 - I 30 


Distance observee 72' 52' 24" 
Somme des refrac- 
tions - - I 28 


Somme - - 72 53 52 
Distance de la 

table - - 72 51 23 


49 28 30 57 51 30 
Depression - - 4 4 


Erreur totale - - 2 29 
Erreur de collima- 
tion - - - I 30 


Hauteur corrigee 49 24 30 57 47 3° 
Refraction - - 51" 37" 


Somme des refrac- 
tions - - i' 28" 


Erreur d'eccen- 
tricite - - - 0' 59" 



RULES FOR USING THE TABLES. 



XXI 



EXEMPLES. 



B— LES DEUX ^TOILES DU MEME COrt DU ZENITH. 

Lc 7 Decembre a la latitude 20' 39' S., a pcu [)i(js, et a la longitude o'' 38'" E.. 
a peu pres, trouver I'eneur d'eccentricite a 27". 

Erreur de coUimaliuii, - i' 20'. 
Baromtlre, 0737'". 
Thermumetre, +2i°'i Centigrade. 
Elevation de I'oeil, 4'" "9. 



Prendre des Tables. 
(Le 3 Decembre) : a Tauri {Aldebaran) et /i Ononis {Rigel). 

/p r^ _^ f Distance, 26° 29' 54". 

\ age 23) <j ^^^.^^ fictive, R.A., lo^^ 56'", Dec., 22° N. 

(Page 45) Arc semi-diurne, 5'' 25'". 



Ascension droite de I'etoile 

fictive - - - - 10'' 56"' 
Arc semi-diurne - - " 5 25 



Difference = Ascension droite 

du meridien - - - 531 
Ascension droite du soleil - 16 55 



Difference = Temps apparent 
approximatif du navire a 
I'instant de I'observation - 12'' 36" 



Hauteur observee 
Hauteur corrigee - 
Refraction - 

Difference des refractions 



Aldebaiaii. A'ii^ei. 
50' 3' 76^ 33' 
49 5^ 76 28 
45" 14" 



31 



Temps approximatif 12'' 36'^ 
Longitude - - o 38 



Somme 

Correction au 
temps (change 
de Tascension 
droite) - 

Temps apparent 
corrige du 
navire a I'in- 
stant de I'obser- 
vation 



II 58 



12" 34" 



Distance observee 26° 29' 31" 
Difference des re- 
fractions - - 31 



Somme - - 26 30 2 
Distance de la 

table - - 26 29 54 



Erreur totale --08 
Erreur de collima- 

tion - - - I 20 



Erreur d'eccen- 
tricite - - -\- i' 12" 



xxii RULES FOR USING THE TABLES. 



GEBRAUCHS-ANWEISUNG DER TAFELN. 



I. Wahl der Stern-Paare. 

Man wahle in der Ephemeride ein Paar Sterne zwischen — 

7 Tage vor I , ^-^ , 

rr. , c dem Datum. 

7 lage nach ) 

Urn die Fehler irgend eines Winkels des Sextanten herauszufinden, nimmt man 
die Paare, welclie den nahe-liegendsten Winkel miteinander bilden. 

II. Data aus den Tafeln. 

Von der in der Ephemeride bezeichneten Seite der "Star Distance Table" 
nimmt man fiir das gevvahlte Paar ; — 

Distanz. 

Rectascension und Declination des fingirten Sterns ("Fictitious Star"). 

Mit der Declination des fingirten Sterns und der Breite nimmt man ebenfalls den 
halben Tagbogen aus Seiten 42-45 der Tafel. 

III. Beobachtungszeit. 

Um die Rectascension des Meridians zu finden, zieht man den halben Tagbogen 
von der Rectascension des fingirten Sterns ab. Von dem Resultat zieht man die 
Rectascension der Sonne im vorgehenden Berlin — Mittage ab (Berliner Jahrbuch). 
Daraus ergiebt sich die annahernde wahre Beobachtungszeit auf dem Schiffe. 

Palls die Beobachtungszeit bis zu 4 Minuten gewiinscht ist, fiige man 
zu dieser annahernden Beobachtungszeit die Liinge ( + W, - O^ und finde 
man die in der Rectascension der Sonne correspondirenden Anderung, 
welche von der annahernden Zeit abzuziehen ist, um die gerade wahre 
Beobachtungszeit auf dem Schiffe zu finden. 

Die Zeit kann gepriift werden durch Davis und Burdwood's " Sun and 
Star Azimuth Tables," oder durch eine verbesscrte Peilung am Compass. 
Die Azimute der zwei Sterne des Paares fiir die Beobachtungszeit sollen 
entweder dieselben sein oder 180° differiren, je nachdem die Sterne sich an 
derselben Seite des Zeniths befinden, oder je ein Stern an jeder Seite. 

IV. Sextant Beobachtung. 

Man richte den Sextanten auf ungefahr ein oder zwei Minuten des in der Tafel 



RULES FOR USING THE TABLES. 



XXI 11 



gegebenen ^Vinkel.s. Man mcssc die Distanz und die Huhen der zwei Sterne. Die 
Hohen unter 15° sind niclit zu empfehlen. 

Falls wenig Zeit vorhanden, ist die Hohe eines Sterns geniigend; weil 
falls der Zenith zwischen den Sternen ist, 180° - (Hohe + Distanz) = Hohe 
des andern Sterns : wenn beide Sterne auf derselben Seite des Zeniths sind, 
Distanz + Hohe des niedrigeren Sterns = Hohe des hoheren Sterns. 



V. Sextant-Distanz. 

Man suche die Refractionen aus der Tafel und fiige ihre Differenz zu der 
beobachteten Distanz, falls beide Sterne auf derselben Seite des Zeniths sind 
und die Summe, wenn der Zenith zwischen den Sternen ist. Das Ergebniss ist die 
verbesserte Sextant-Distanz. Die Differenz von der in der Tafel gegebenen Distanz 
ist der totale Fehler, d.h. die Summe des collimations, und des Eccentricitats- 
fehler. 



XXIV 



RULES FOR USING THE TABLES. 



BEISPIELE. 



A.— ZENITH ZWISCHEN DEN STERNEN. 

Am 2 December, Breite ca. 48° 35' N., Lange ca. 2'' 51'" W'., urn den Eccentrici- 
tiitsfehler am 72° zu finden. 

Collimationsfehler, - i' 30". 
Barometer, 0762'". 
Termometer, +6' Reaumur. 
Hohe uberm Meeresspiegel, 16 Fuss. 



Aus den Tafeln. 

(Am 5 December) : a Ursae Minoris {Polaris) und a Tauri {AMebaran). 

,p ^ ( Distanz, 72° 51' 23". 

I 'ige 24) <j pij^gij-ter Stern, R.A., lo^' 31™, Dec, 1° N. 

(Page 42) Halber Tagbogen, 6^ 5™. 



Rectascension des fingirten 
Sterns . - - - 
Halber Tagbogen - 



10" 31^ 
6 5 



Differenz = Rectascension des 






Meridians 


4 


26 


Rectascension der Sonne 


16 


Zl 



Annahernde Zeit - ri'' 53'' 
Lange - + 



5^ 



Differenz = Annahernde wahre 
Beobachtungszeit auf dem 
Schiffe - - - - 



11" 53^ 



Summa - - 14 44 
Correction zur Zeit 

(Anderung der 

Rectascension) - 2 
Gerade wahre 

Beobachtungszeit 

auf dem Scliiffe 11'' qi' 



Polaris. Aldeharau. 

Beobachtete Hohe 49° 30' o" 57° 53' o" 



Collimationsfehler 



Duckung 



I 30 - 



49 28 30 57 51 30 
4 o 



Beobachtete Dis- 
tanz - - 72° 52' 24" 

Summa der Re- 

fractionen - i 28 



Summa - - 72 53 52 
4 o Distanz aus der 

Tafel - - 72 51 23 



Verbesserte Hohe 49 24 30 57 47 30 



Refraction - 
Summa der Re- 
fractionen 



51 



37 



i' 28" 



Totaler Fchler - - 2 29 

Collimationsfehler - i 30 

Eccentricitats- 

fehler - - - o' 59" 



RULES FOR USING THE TABLES. 



XXV 



BEISPIELE. 

B. -DIE BEIDEN STERNE AN DERSELBEN SEITE 

DES ZENITHS. 

Am 7 December, Breite ca. 20° 39' S., Lange ca. o'' 7'" W., um den Eccentricitats- 
fehlei" am 27° zu fmdcn. 

Collimatioiisfehlcr, - i' 2o". 
Barometer, o 737™. 
Termometer, +17° Reaumur. 
Ilohe iiberm Meeresspicgel, 16 Fuss. 



Aus den Tafeln. 

(Am 3 December) : a Tauri {Aldebara7i) und /3 Orionis {Rigel). 

,p V j Distanz, 26° 29' 54". 

V^'i^ 25) , pij^gi,.jgj. 3^gr„^ ^ s^^ ^qI, -5.1,^ i3gc., 22° N. 

(Page 45) Halber Tagbogen, 5'' 25'". 



Rectascension des fingirten 

Sterns - - - - 10'^ 56*^ 
Halber Tagbogen - - - 525 



Differenz = Rectascension des 

Meridians - - " 5 3^ 
Rectascension der Sonne - 16 55 



Differenz = Annahernde wahre 
Beobaclitungszeit auf 
dem Schiffe 



Annahernde Zeit 12'' 36'" 
Lange - +07 



Summa 

Correction zurZeit 
(Anderung der 
Rectascension) 

Gerade wahre 
Beobachtungs- 
zeit auf dem 
Schiffe - 



12 43 



J 2 11 3411 



Beobachtete Hohe 
Verbesserte Hohe 
Refraction - 



Aldcbaran. Rii^el. 

50° 3' 76' 33' 

49 5S 76 28 

45" 14" 



Differenz der Refractionen 



Beobachtete Dis- 
tanz - - 26° 29' 31" 

Differenz der Re- 
fractionen - 31 



Summa - - 26 30 2 
Distanz aus der 

Tafcl - - 26 29 54 



Totaler Fehler --08 
Collimationsfehler - i 20 



Eccentricitats- 
fehler - - + i' 12" 



STAHS AND SEXTANTS. 



EPHEMERIS, 1904. 



Date. 



Jan. 



Jan. 



Distance available 
between 



Dec. 25 and Jan. 8 



Dec. 26 and Jan. 



Jan. 3 I Dec. 27 and Jan. 10 



Jan. 4 Dec. 28 and Jan. 1 1 



Jan. 



Jan. 7 



Jan. 8 



Dec. 29 and Jan. 12 



Dec. 31 and Jan. 14 



Jan. I and Jan. i 5 



Star Pair. 



Names. 



Mags. 



Approxi- 
mate 
Di.stance. 



a Ursse Minoris : S Canis INfajoris 

y Orionis : S Argfts 

y Orionis : a Ursce Majoris 

/3Tauri : 8 Argiis 

/? Tauri : a Ursse ]\rajoris 

I Orionis : /3 Argus 

(3 Canis Majoris : c Canis INIajoris 

a Ursse Minoris : a Geminorum .. 

a Tauri : rj Ursae Majoris 

a Aurigae : 8 Argus 

a Aurigte : a Ursse Majoris 

e Orionis : a Ursse JNIajoris 

( Orionis : y Argus 

I Orionis : 8 Argus 

fS Canis Majoris : 8 Canis Majoris 
y Geminorum : e Canis Majoris... 
y Geminorum : a Geminorum 



I Orionis : a Ursse INTajoris 

a Orionis : e Argiis 

a Orionis : a Trianguli Australis 
j3 Canis Majoris : a Geminorum. 
y Geminorum ; 8 Canis Majoris.. 



2-1 

17 

17 

1-8 

1-8 

2-0 : 17 

2-0 : 1-6 



2-0 
2-0 
2-0 
2-0 
2-0 



21 

ri 

0"2 
0*2 

17 
2"0 
2"0 
2*0 

1-9 



2-0 

1-9 

2"0 
2*0 
2*0 
19 
2-0 
2'0 

1-6 

2'0 



2'0 : 2-0 

ro-r4 : I 
ro-i '4 : I -9 

2-0 : 2'0 

I 9 : 2'o 

17 : 2-0 
ro-i -4 : 1-9 



6 Orionis : 8 Argus 

a Orionis : y Argvis 

a Orionis : J3 Argus ]i-o-i'4 : i 

2-0 : r2 
19 : I '2 



/? Canis IMajoris : /3 Geminorum., 
y Geminorum : /3 Geminorum. 



a Ursse Minoris : [3 Geminorum 
a Orionis : a \JvstG Majoris , 



a Tauri : y Crucis 

(3 Orionis : e Ursae Majoris , 
/3 Tauri : e Ursae ]\Iajoris.... 
a Orionis : 8 ArL^ds 



a Eridani : Scorpii. 
a Persci : a Lconis... 
a Tauri : a Leonis.... 



2-1 : 1-2 
I0-I-4 : 2-0 

i-i : 1-6 

0-3 : 1-8 

1-8 : 1-8 

ro-r4 : 2'o 



o"5 : 20 
1-9 : 1-3 
i-i : 1-3 



116 

7 + 
82 

94 
62 

76 



58 
104 
1 10 

49 
87 
56 
65 

14 

46 

20 



87 
73 
JI7 
53 
43 

66 
62 
84 
50 
'9 

62 

77 

119 
1 1 1 

78 
71 

68 

88 
80 



Look in Star Distance List for the ist Star of the pair in bold type. 



STARS AND SEXTANTS. 



EPHEMERIS, 1904. 



Date. 



Distance available 
between 



Jan. 8 I Jan. i and Jan. 15 



Jan. 9 Jan. 2 and Jan. 16 



Jan. 10 



Jan. 



Jan 



Jan. 3 and Jan. r 



Jan. 1 3 



Jan. 14 



Jan. 1 5 



Jan. 1 6 



Jan. 4 and Jan. i 8 



Jan. 5 and Jan. 19 



Jan. 6 aTid Jan. 20 



Jan. 7 and Jan. 2 1 



Jan. 8 and Jan. 22 



Jan. 9 and Jan. 23 



Star Pair. 



Names. 



Mags, 



a Aurigse : e Ursre Majoris 

y Ononis : e Ursa? Majoris 

e Canis Majoris : a Geminorum 



S Canis Majoris : a Geminorum 



€ Orionis : e Ursae Majoris 

^ Orionis : e Urs3e Majoris 

e Canis Majoris : S Canis Majoris 
e Canis Majoris : /3 Geminorum... 
a Geminorum : /3 Geminorum 



y Geminorum : y Argvls 

y Geminorum : a Ursse Majoris... 
8 Canis Majoris : /? Geminorum... 



/? Tauri : 77 Ursse Majoris .. 
a Orionis : e Ursfe Majoris. 

y Geminorum : e Argus 

a Geminorum : a Lyrte 



y Orionis : r) Ursae Majoris 

/? Canis Majoris : a Ursse Majoris 



0-2 : 1-8 
17 : 1-8 
r6 : 2'o 



2*0 : 2"0 



17 : 1-8 
2'o : I '8 
I '6 : 2-0 
r6 : I '2 

2"0 : 1*2 



1-9: 1-9 

l'9 : 2-0 
2"o ; I'2 



1-8 : 1-9 
ro-i'4 : r 
1-9: 17 
2-0 : o-i 



17 : 1-9 

2-0 : 2-0 



a Aurigse : rj Urste Majoris 0*2 : 1*9 

(3 Canis Majoris : y Argus 2*0 : I'g 

y Geminorum : (3 Argus P9 : r 



a Eridani : € Sagittarii 0'5 : 1*9 

(3 Orionis : a Leonis 

y Orionis : a Leonis 

(S Tauri : a Leonis 

e Orionis : 7] Ursse Majoris. 
j3 Canis Majoris : e Aryus,, 



0'3 
17 
1-8 
17 

2"0 



y Geminorum : 8 Argus 1 1 "9 



1-3 

1-3 
i'3 
1-9 

17 

2-0 



a Ursse Minoris : a Ursa? Majori.' 

a Aurigse : a Leonis 

e Orionis : a Leonis 

^ Orionis : t] Ursse Majoris 



2-1 : 2'0 
02 : 1-3 
17 : 13 
2'0 : I "9 



Approxi 

mate 

Di.?tance. 



6+ 
97 
61 



59 



102 

102 

3 

58 
5 



67 
65 

55 



92 

79 

108 



107 
97 

74 
37 
90 

70 
76 
70 

67 
1 12 

47 
76 



29 

70 

69 

1 12 



Look in Star Distance Li.st for the i.st Star of the pair in bold type. 



STARR AND SEXTANl^R 



EPIIEMERIS, 1904. 



Date. 



Distance available 
bctwcfii 



Jail. 17 Jan. 10 and Jan. 24 



Ian. 18 ' Jan. 1 1 and Jan. 25 



Jan. 19 , Jan. 12 and Jan. 26 



Tan. 20 Jan. 13 and Jan. 27 



Tan. 21 Jan. 14 and Jan. 28 



Tan. 22 Jan. 15 and Jan. 29 



Tan. 23 Jan. 16 and Jan. 30 



Jan. 24 Jan. 17 and Jan. 3 i 



Jan. 25 Jan. 18 and Feb. i 



Star Pair. 



Names. 



I OrionLs : a Leonis. 



Mass. 



2-0 : 1-3 



iS Orionis : a Crucis 0"3 : i*o 

y Orionis : a Crucis i 7 : i "o 

a Orionis : a Leonis [ro-i "4 : i "3 

a Orionis : r] Ursoe Majoris :ro-r4 • "'9 

a Geminorum : a Ursse Majoris... .j 2"o : 2-0 



Approxi- 
mate 
Distance. 



68 



91 

103 

62 
102 



(3 Canis Majoris : 8 Argds 

y Geminorum : c Ursae IMajoris . , 
a Geminorum : y Argus 



2'0 : 2"0 

1-9 : 1-8 
20 : rg 



ft Canis Majoris : [3 Argus 2 "o : 1 7 

[3 Geminonim : a Ursse Majoris...! 1-2 : 2-0 
/? Geminorum : a Lyrfe j 12:0-1 



e Canis Majoris : a Urs;e ^NTajoris. 

a Geminorum : € Argus 

(S Geminorum : y Argus 



e Orionis : a Crucis 

ft Canis Majoris : e Ursee Majoris 
8 Canis Majoris : a Ursse Majoris. 



1*6 : 2'o 
2-0 : 17 
1-9 



12 



17 : ro 

2-0 : 1 -8 



y Orionis : /5 Crucis ' 17 : rj 

y Geminorum : a Leonis i 1-9 : 1 '3 

e Canis Majoris : y Argiis } 16: r9 



y Orionis : y Crucis 17 : p6 

a Geminorum : 8 Argirs 2*0 : 2-0 

/5 Geminorum : e Argus 1 -2 : 1 7 



ft Orionis : y Crucis 

ft Orionis : ft Crucis 

4 Orionis : a Crucis 

a Orionis : a Crucis 

y Geminorum : rj Ursae IVrajorif 

8 Canis Majoris : y Argus , 

a Geminorum : ft Argus 



0-3 : 1-6 
0-3: 1-5 
2'o : I "O 
10-1 '4 : 1 "o 
1-9: 1-9 
2'o : l"9 
2-0 : 17 j 



45 



46 

79 
80 



58 

47 

1 1 1 



103 
92 
76 

95 
109 

100 



106 
51 

23 

104 
88 
88 



93 
94 
93 

100 
88 
24 

103 



Look in Star Distance List for the ist Star of the pair in bold type. 



4 



STARS AND SEXTANTS. 



EPHEMERIS, 1904. 



Date. 



Distance available 
between 



Star Pair. 



Names. 



Map's. 



Approxi- 
mate 
Distance. 



•Fan. 26 ! Jan. 19 and Feb. 2 



Jan. 28 



Jan. 21 and Feb. 4 



Jan. 



30 



Jan. 3 1 



Feb. I 



Feb. 



Feb. 3 



y Orionis : ft Centauri 

/i Canis Majoris : a Leonis 

a Geminorum : e Ursae Majoris 
ft Geminorum : 8 Argus 

a Eridani : ft Argus 

e Canis Majoris : e Argus 

a Geminorum : a Leonis 

ft Geminorum : ft Argiis 

ft Geminorum : c Ursse Majoris 



Jan. 29 : Jan. 22 and Feb. 5 



17 :o-8 
2-0 : 1-3 
2-0 : 1-8 
1 "2 : 2'0 



0-5 : 17 
r6 : 17 
2-0 : 1-3 
1 '2 : 17 
1-2 : 1-8 



Jan. 23 and Feb. 6 



Jan. 24 and Feb. 7 



Jan. 25 and Feb. 8 



Jan. 26 and Feb. 9 



Jan. 27 and Feb. 10 



a TIrsae Minoris : e Urs?p ^rnjoris 2-1 : rS 

e Orionis : y Crucis ' 1 7 : i "6 

e Orionis : ft Crucis 17 : i'^ 

S Canis Majoris : e Argus 2-0:17 

ft Geminorum : a Leonis \i : i"3 



'C Orionis : ft Crucis 

a Orionis :y Crucis 

a Orionis : ft Crucis 

ft Canis Majoris : 7) Ursse Majoris 
€ Canis ]\Iajoris : 8 Argus 



a Ursse Minoris : a Leonis 
^ Orionis : y Crucis 



ft Orionis : ft Centauri 

8 Canis Majoris : 8 Argus 

a Geminorum : rj Ursse Majoris. 



e Orionis : ft Centauri 

e Canis Majoris : a Leonis 

€ Canis Majoris : c Urs;e .Majori.s. 
8 Canis Majoris : € \JviX, Majoris, 



y Geminorum : a Crucis 

8 Canis Majoris : a Leonis 

ft Geminorum : -q Ursa' Majoiis., 



2"o : 1*5 

I •0-1-4 '• ^'^ 

1-0-1-4 • ^'5 

2 -o : 1 -9 

1-6 : 2-0 



2-1 : 1-3 
2-0 : 1-6 



0-3 : 0-8 
2-0 : 2-0 
20 : 1-9 



1-7 :o-8 
1-6 : 1-3 
1-6: 1-8 
2-0 : rS 



1-9 : i-o 
2-0: 1-3 
12 : 1-9 



114 
63 
59 

84 



45 

34 

4' 

99 
60 



35 
96 
98 
36 

37 



97 

lOI 

103 
117 

32 



95 



33 
68 



106 
61 

113 
1 10 



103 

58 
69 



Look in Star Distance List for the ist Star of the pair in bold type. 



STAES AND SEXTANTS. 



EPHEMERIS, 1904. 



Date. 



Distance available 
between 



Star Pair. 



Names. 



Mat's. 



Ajiproxi- 

mate 
Distance. 



Feb. 4 

Feb. 5 
Feb. 6 



Jan. 28 and Feb. 1 1 

Jan. 29 and Feb. i 2 
Jan. 30 and Feb. i 3 



'C Orionis : (i Centauri. 
a Orionis : /? Centauri 



a Eridani : a Leonis 

6 Canis Majoris : /? Argus 



Feb. 7 I Jan. 31 and Feb, 14 



Feb. 8 



2'o : o 
ro-i'4 : o 

0-5 : 1-3 

1-6 : 1*7 



8 ' 10; 



8 112 



+5 



y Geminorum : y Crucis 1-9 : i •6 103 

y Geminorum : /i Crucis 1-9 :r5 105 

8 Canis Majoris : /3 Argus 2-0 : 17 47 



Feb. I and Feb. i 



y Argus : a Ursae Majoris 



Feb. 9 Feb. 2 and Feb. 1 6 



Feb. 10 



Feb. 3 and Feb. 1 7 



Feb. 1 1 Feb. 4 and Feb. 1 8 



Feb. 12 



Feb. 1 3 



Feb. 1 4 



Feb. 1 5 



Feb. 16 



a Ursse Minoris : -q Ursa3 Majoris 
e Canis Majoris : rj Ursae Majoris 



S Canis Majoris : -q Ur.^se Majoris, 



a Leonis : a Ursse Majoris. 



Feb. 5 and Feb. 19 



Feb. 6 and Feb. 20 



Feb. 7 and Feb. 2 1 



Feb. 8 and Feb. 22 



Feb. 9 and Feb. 2 3 



y Geminorum : fi Centauri 

a Ursae Majoris : e Urste Majoris.. 



1-9 : 2*0 i 115 



2'i : 1-9 
1-6 : r9 



2-0 : 1-9 



1-3 : 2-0 



1 9 : o'o 
20 : i"8 



119 



116 



51 



i'5 

15 



a Geminorum : a Crucis. 



a Leonis : a Cygni, 



2'o : I'o III 



i-3:i-3 119 



ft Geminorum : a Crucis : i'2 : i-o 

8 Argus : a Ursae Majoris 2-0 : 2-0 



a Orionis : a Virginis |ro-r4 : 1-2 113 

107 
120 

116 

7+ 
109 

65 



c Orionis : a Virginis 

I Orionis : a Virginis 

ft Canis Majoris : a Crucis. 
a Geminorum : y Crucis .. 
y Argus : a Leonis 



17 

2'0 
2-0 
1-9 



r2 

1-2 

ro 
1-6 
1-3 



Look in Star Distance List for the ist Star of the pair in bold type. 



6 



STARS AND SEXTANTS. 



EPIIEMERIS, 1904. 



Date. 



Distance available 
between 



Star Pair. 



Names, 



Approxi- 
Mags. mate 

Distance. 



Feb. 17 Feb. 10 and Feb. 24 



Feb. I 8 Feb. 1 1 and Feb. 2 5 



Feb. 19 Feb. 1 2 and Feb. 26 



u Eridani : 8 Argus 

/3 Ononis : a Virginis 

a Geminorum : /3 Crncis. 
/^ Geminoruni : y Crucis.. 



0-5 : 2"o 
0-3 : 1-2 
2-0 : r5 
r2 : i'6 



53 
120 
112 

104 



ft Geminorum : ft Ciueis. 



Feb. 20 



Feb. 22 



Feb. 24 



Feb. 2 5 



Feb. 26 



a Eridani : e Argiis 

ft Canis Majoris : y Crucis 



1-2 : r5 107 



0-5 : 17 ] 
2"o : 1-6 



y GeminoruiLi : a Virginia 1-9 : i "2 



Feb. 13 and Feb. 27 



Feb. 1 5 and Feb. 29 



Feb. 1 7 and Mar. 2 



Feb, 1 8 and Mar. 3 



Feb. 19 and ]\Iar. 4 



ft Canis Majoris : ft Crucis 
a Leonis : c Ursae Majoris ., 



2'o : I "5 
1-3: vS 



y Argus : e Ursae Majoris ' i '9 : i-8 

e Argus : a Leonis 17 : i'3 

8 Argus : a Leonis • 2-0 : 1-3 

a Ursse Majoris : 1] Ursse INIajoris | 2 o : 1 "9 



ft Geminorum : ft Centauri ; i'2 : o"8 



a Geminorum : a Virginis 



ft Geminorum : a Virginis . 

y Argus ; € Argus 

y Argiis : 8 Argus 



Feb. 27 j Feb. 20 and Mar. 5 



Mar. I Feb. 23 and Mar. 8 



'yiixv. 2 Feb, 24 and Mar. 9 



a Ursse Minoris : a Lyraj.. 
a Leonis : r] Ursai Majoris. 



2'0 : 1-2 



12 


\'Z 


91 


I "9 


17 


I 2 


1-9 


2"0 


9 


2-1 


O'l 


S2 


13 


1-9 


58 



/i Canis Majoris : a Virginis. 



2"o : r2 



Mar. 3 



ft Canis Majoris : /i Centauri 2-0 : o-8 

ft Argus : a Leonis i 7 : i "3 



Feb. 2 5 and I\Iar. i o 



8 Canis Majoris ; a Crucis. 



48 

76 

104 



5 + 



119 

75 
69 

26 



n6 



9+ 



86 

82 



62 



Look in Star Distance List for the ist Star of the pair in bold type. 



STARS AND SEXTANTS. 



EPHEMERIS, 1904. 



Date. 



Distance available 
between 



Star Pair. 



Names. 



Mn; 



I Approxi- 
mate 
Distance. 



Page. 



Mar. 4 Feb. 26 and ^Tar. 1 1 



Mar. 5 Feb. 27 and Mar. 1 2 



Mar. 6 Feb. 28 and ]Mar. i 3 



Mar. 7 Feb. 29 and Mar. 14 



Mar. 9 INIfir. 2 and ]Mar. 1 6 



_ Canis i\Iajoris : a Cruci.? ' i'6: 10 

8 Canis Majoris : y Cracis 2"o : 16 



[3 Canis Majoris : a Trianguli Aust 2*0 : 1-9 
e Ursce Majoris : rj Ursse Majoris i'8 ; rg 



e Canis ]\Lajoris : y Crucis , i"6 : i 6 



€ Canis Majoris : /5 Crucis 1 i6: 1-5 

8 Canis Majoris : y8 Crucis 2 "o : i • 5 



e Canis Majoris : a Virginis. 



Mar. I o 



Mar. 1 3 



Mar. I 5 



Mar. 1 6 



Mar. 1 7 



Mar. 18 



Mar. 22 



Mar. 3 and Mar. 17 



Mar. 6 and Mar. 20 



Mar. 8 and Mar. 22 



Mar. 9 and Mar. 23 



Mar. 10 and Mar. 24 



Mar. 1 1 and Mar. 2 5 



Mar. 15 and Mar. 29 



S Canis Majoris : a Virginis . 
e Argus : 8 Argus 



y Argus ; jS Argus . 

a Leon is : a Crucis. 
a Leonis : y Crucis. 



a Leouis : /3 Crucis.. 
a Leonis : a Virginis. 
a Leonis : a Lyrse 



2"o : r2 
17 : 2-0 

1-9: 17 



1-3 : i-o 
13 : 1-6 



1-3 : 15 
1-3 : 1-2 
1-3 :o-i 



8 Canis ]\[ajoris : [3 Centauri j 2-0 : o- 8 

a Ursse Maj oris : 0, Virginis [ 2-0: 1-2 



a UrssB Minoris : a Virginis 2-1 : 12 

£ Canis Majoris : (3 Centauri r6 : o'S 



a Leonis : /S Centauri 



Mar. 26 Mar. 19 and Apr. 2 



e UrsjB Majoris : a Virginis. 



1-3 :o-8 



61 
63 



91 
10 



62 



6+ 
65 



r6 : r2 ' 90 



89 
6 



24 

80 
75 

78 

5 + 
109 



7+ 

78 



102 
73 

86 
67 



Look iu Star Distance List for the ist Star of the pair in bold type. 



STAES AND SEXTANTS. 



EPHEMERIS, 1904. 



Date. 



Distance available 
between 



I\rar. 


27 


^lar. 


28 


Mar. 


29 


Mar. 


30 


Mar. 


31 


Apr. 


I 


Apr. 


3 


Apr. 


4 


Apr. 


5 


Apr. 


7 


Apr. 


8 


Apr. 


10 


Apr. 


12 



Mar. 20 and Apr. 3 



Mar. 2 I and Apr. 4 



Mar. 22 and Apr. 5 



Mar. 2 3 and Apr. 6 



]\ far. 24 and Apr. 7 



Mar. 2 5 and Apr. 8 



Mar. 27 and Apr. 10 



Mar. 28 and Apr. 1 1 



Mar. 29 and Apr. 12 



Mar. 31 and Apr. 14 



Apr. I and Apr. 1 5 



Apr. 3 and Apr. 1 7 



Apr. 5 and Apr. 19 



Star Tair. 



Names. 



Mags 



Approxi- 
mate 
Distance. 



y Argus : a A^irginis 



8 Argus : fS Argus. 



tt Leonis : a Trianguli Australis. 

a Crucis : c Urs^e Majoris 

y Crucis : c Ursse Majoiis 



1*9 : 1 '2 



y Argiis : y Crucis. 



8 Canis Majoris : a Trianguli Aust, 
y Argus : a Crucis, 



1-3 : 1-9 

ro : 1-8 
1-6 : 1-8 



1-9 : 1-6 



2-0 : i'9 

1-9 : i-o 

/3 Crucis : c Urste jNlajoris i 1-5 : 1 -8 

y Argiis : /3 Crucis < r9 : i'5 

8 Argils : a Virginis I 2"o : 1-2 

a Virginis : 7/ Ursa3 Majoiis j i"2 : i"9 



Argus : fi Argus 17 : 17 



Argus : a Virginis 1 7 : I "2 



e Canis Majoris : a Trianguli Aust. 
y Crucis : 7] Urste Majoris 



8 Argds : y Crucis 

/3 Crucis : y Ursae Majoris. 



i"6 : i-() 
1-6 : 1-9 

2'o : I "6 
1-5 : 19 



8 Argils : a Crucis 2"o : i-o 

a Leonis : a Scorpii 1*3 : i '3 

a Crucis : 7; Ursae Majoris ro : i"9 



8 Argils : /S Crucis . . 

e Ursai Majoris : (3 Centauri 



a Ursse Minoris : a Cygni. 
e Argus : y Crucis 



2"o : 1-5 
1-8 :o-8 



2-1 : 1-3 
17 : 1-6 



74 
15 

105 
119 
113 

40 



81 

38 
116 



41 
69 

61 



73 



79 

108 



31 
1 10 



29 
100 
114 

32 
117 

45 
32 



Look in Star Distance List for tie ist Star of tlie pair in bold type. 



STARS AND SEXTANTS. 



9 



EPHEMERIS, 1904. 



Date. 



Apr. 1 3 



Apr. 1 4 



Apr. 1 5 



Apr. 16 



Apr. 1 7 



Apr. 18 



Apr. 1 9 



Apr. 20 



Apr. 24 



Apr. 25 



Apr. 26 



Apr. 27 



Distance available 
betwteu 



Star Pair. 



Names. 



Apr. 6 and Apr. 20 



Apr. 7 and Apr. 21 



Apr. 8 and Apr. 2 2 



Apr. 9 and Apr. 23 



Apr. 10 and Apr. 24 



Apr. 1 1 and Apr. 25 



Apr. 12 and Apr. 26 



Apr. 13 and Apr. 27 



Apr. 1 7 and May i 



Apr. 1 8 and May 2 



Apr. 19 and May 3 



Apr. 20 and May 4 



y Argus : (3 Centauri 
a Leonis : 6 Scorpii . . 



(S Argiis : a Virginis. 
a Leonis : A Scorpii.. 



e Argils : /3 Crucis 



€ Argus : a Crucis 

7] Ursse Majoris : fi Centauri 



8 Canis Majoris : a Scorpii. 
y Crucis ; a Virginis 



tt Ursa} Majoris : a Scorpii. 

fj Crucis : a Virginis 

£ Ursae Majoris : a Lyrse... 



8 Argus : /3 Centauri. 



e Canis Majoris : a Scorpii. 
a Crucis : a Virginis ....... 



(3 Argils : y Crucis 



(3 Argiis : a Crucis 

a Virginis : /3 Centauri . 



€ Argus : f3 Centauri 
/3 Argiis : f3 Crucis... 



y Crucis : /3 Crucis 

e Ursse Majoris : a Scorpii. 



Mags. 



Approxi 

mate 

Distance. 



1-9:08 
1-3 : 20 



17 : 1-2 

1-3 : 1-8 



17: 1-5 



17 : I'o 
I "9 : 0"8 



2-0 : 1-3 
i"6 : 12 



2-0 : 1-3 
15: 12 
1-8 :o-i 



2'0 : 07 



1-6: 13 
ro : I "2 



17 : r6 



17 

12 



ro 

0-8 



17 :o-8 
17: 1-5 



r6 : r5 
1-8: 1-3 



50 
114 



70 
114 



32 



28 
1 10 



47 



109 

+9 

57 



41 



114 

53 



25 

20 
50 



40 
24 



3 

94 



Look in Star Distance List for the ist Star of the pair in bold type. 



lO 



STARS AND SEXTANTS. 



EPHEMERIS, 1904. 



Date. 



Distance available 
between 



Star Pair. 



Names. 



Ajipioxi- 
Mags. mate 

I Distance, 



Page. 



Apr. 28 
Apr. 30 
j\Iay I 

May 2 
May 3 
May 6 

May 7 
May 8 

May 9 

May I o 

May II 

j\Iay 1 2 



Apr. 21 and May 5 
Ai)r. 23 and May 7 
Apr. 24 and May 8 

Apr. 25 and May 9 
Apr. 26 and May 10 
Apr. 29 and May 13 

Apr. 30 and May 14 
May I and May i 5 

May 2 and May 1 6 

May 3 and May 1 7 

j\ray 4 and May 1 8 

May 5 and May 19 



a Crucis : y Crucis . 
a Crucis : (i Crucis. 



8 Canis Majoris : 6 Scorpii. 
7] Ursce Majoris : a Scorpii . 
7] Ursse Majoris : a Lyrte... 



y Argus : a Scori^ii 

y Argils : a Trianguli Australia 



S Canis Majoris : A. Scur[)ii. 
y Crucis : /? Centauri 



(i Argus : /i Centauri 

/3 Crucis : /? Centauri 

a Virginis : a Scorpii 

a Virginis : a Ti'iauguli Australis 



8 Argus : a Scorpii., 
a Virginis : a Lyrce. 



8 Argus : a Trianguli Australis 

a Crucis : /? Centauri 

£ Ursa3 Majoris : X Scorpii 

e Ursae Majoris : 6 Scorpii 



P Canis Majoris : 6 Scorpii , 



Canis Majoris : A. Scorpii i'6 : i-8 



10 : r6 
ro : 1-5 

2'0 : 2"0 

1-9: 1-3 
19 : 01 



19: 1-3 
1-9: 1-9 



2'o : x"8 
1-6 :o-8 



17 :o-8 
1-5 :o-8 
1-2 : 1-3 
1-2 : 1-9 



2-0 : I '3 
1-2 : o'l 



2'0 : I "9 
ro : 0-8 
1-8 : 1-8 
1*8 : 2-0 



2'0 : 2'0 



€ Canis Majoris : 6 Scorpii. 



e Argus : a Scorpii.... 
a Virginis : A Scorpii. 
a Virgini.s : 6 Scorpii . 



16 : 2*o 



17:1-3 
1-2 : 1-8 

1-2 : 2'0 



108 
8 + 
51 



9' 

5« 



113 
12 



30 

9 

46 

66 



82 



49 
12 

no 

116 



118 



1 1 1 



106 



82 
61 
^1, 



Look in Star Distance List for the ist Star of the pair in bold type. 



STARS AND SEXTANTS. 



1 1 



EPHEMERIS, 1904. 



Date. 



Distance available 
between 



May 13 M;iy 6 and May 20 



jNIay 1 5 ^lay 8 and May 2 2 

i\Iay 1 6 May 9 and May 2 3 

May 17 May 10 and May 24 

May 18 May 1 1 and May 25 

May 1 9 May 1 2 and May 2 6 

May 20 May 1 3 and Afay 27 



May 2 1 



May 22 



May 24 



May 1 4 and May 2 8 



May 15 and JNIay 29 



May 1 7 and May 3 i 



Star Pair. 



Names. 



a Eridani ; a Virginis 

a Virginis : a Cygni 

rj Ursse Majoiis : A. Scorpii. 
■q Ursai Majoris : 6 Scorpii., 
y) Ursse Majoris : a Cygni . . 



Ap])roxi- 

mate 
Distance. 



y Crucis : a Scorpii 

a Ursse Minoris : a Scorpii. 



y Argus : X Scorpii 
y Argus : 6 Scorpii. 



/3 Crucis : a Scorpii 

e Ursse Majoris : e Sagittarii. 



a Crucis : a Scorpii 

y Crucis : a Trianguli Australia, 
a Virginis : e Sagittarii 



e Argiis : a Trianguli Australis. 
(i Argils : a Scorpii 



/3 Crucis : a Trianguli Australis. 
>/ Ursse Majoris : c Sagittarii 



a Crucis : a Trianguli Australis. 
a Virginis : a Pavouis 



May 25 May 1 8 and June i 



(i Argiis : a Trianguli Australia.. 

y Crucis : A. Scorpii 

y Crucis : 6 Scorpii 



€ Argils : Scorpii 

ft Centauri : a Trianguli Australis 



0-5 : I'z 
■z : 1-3 
•9 : 1-8 
•9 : 2-0 
•9: 1-3 

•6 : 1-3 
•I : 13 

•9:1-8 
•9 : 2*o 

•5 : i"3 
•8 : 1-9 



•o : 1-3 
•6 : 1-9 
•2 : 1-9 



7 : 1-9 

7: 1-3 

•5:1-9 
•9:1-9 



■o : 1-9 
•2 : 2-0 



8 Canis Majoris : c Sagittarii 2-0 : 1-9 

8 Argiis : X Scorpii 2 -o : r 

8 i\rgiis : 6 Scori)ii I'o : 2-0 

ft Centauri : a Scorpii 0-8 : 1*3 



1-7: 1-9 
1-6: 18 
1-6 : 2-0 



1-7 : 2-0 
0-8 : 1-9 



1 12 
1 1 1 

100 

105 

64 

52 
117 

89 
84 

50 
114 

53 
30 
71 

46 
72 

26 
104 



26 



118 

79 
7+ 
42 



3+ 
52 
48 



72 
>9 



Patje. 



Look in Star Distance List for the ist Star of the pair in bold type. 



12 



STARS AND SEXTANTS. 



EPHEMERIS, 1904. 



Date. 



Distance available 
between 



Star Pair. 



Names. 



Mass. 



Apinoxi- 

iiiate 
Distance. 



^lay 26 MayigandJune 2 



^lay 27 



iMay 2 8 



May 30 



Juue I 



c Argus : X Scorpii 

/? Crucis : A Scorpii . . . 
/3 Crucis : Scorpii.... 
/3 Centauri : X Scorpii 
j3 Centauri : 6 Scorpii 



May 20 and June 3 



e Canis Majoris : e Sagittarii 

y Argus : e Sagittarii 

tt Crucis : X Scorpii 

a Cruuis : 6 Scorpii 

a Yirginis : a Aquike 



May 2 1 and June 4 



May 2 3 and June 6 



May 25 and June 8 



a Ursse Minoris : a Persei 



/3 Argus : X Scorpii... 
/3 Argus : 6 Scorpii... 
y Crucis : c Sagittarii. 
a Virgiuis : a Gruis... 



8 Argus : c Sagittarii 
/i Centauri : a Lyrce . 



Tune 2 May 26 and June 9 



June 4 



June 5 



June 7 



June 8 



June 9 



/3 Crucis : e Sagittarii 

a Scorpii : a Trianguli Australis. 



May 28 and Juue 11 



May 29 and June 1 2 



May 3 1 and June 1 4 



June I and June i 5 



June 2 and Juno 16 



a Crucis : € Sagittarii , 



a Scorpii : X Scorpii. 



e Argus : € Sagittarii 

/i Centauri : e Sagittarii. 
a Scorpii : Scorpii 



y Crucis : a Pavonis. 



e Ursse Majoris : a Aquilae. 
■q Ursae Majoris : a Aquilte. 



17 : 1-8 
1-5 : 1-8 
I "5 : 2"o 
0-8 : 1-8 
o"8 : 2"o 

16: 19 
1-9: 19 
10: 1-8 
ro : 2"o 
I "2 : o"9 

2"i : 19 



17 


1-8 


66 


17 


2-0 


61 


1-6 


I "9 


61 


r2 


19 


107 


2*0 


1-9 


86 


0-8 


o-i 


114 


!•'; 


19 


58 


13 


19 


43 



ro : ro 



1-3: r 



17 : 1-9 
0-8 : I "9 
1-3 :2-o 



1-6 : 2"0 



r8 : 0-9 
I -9: 0-9 



77 

50 
46 
40 
36 

116 
95 

52 
47 
98 

39 



59 



83 
48 
22 

56 

90 



Look in Star Distance List for the ist Star of the pair in bold type. 



STARS AND SEXTANTS. 



13 



EPHEMERIS, 1904. 



Date. 



Distance available 
between 



Star Pair. 



Names. 



Majrs. 



Approxi- 
mate 
Distance, 



June 10 June 3 and Juue 17 



June 1 1 

June 1 2 
June 13 

June I 4 

June 1 5 

June 1 6 
June 18 

June 19 

June 20 
June 2 1 

June 22 



/? Argus : e Sagittarii. 
a Scorpii : a Lyra3 .... 



June 4 and June 1 8 

June 5 and June 19 
June 6 and June 20 

June 7 and June 2 1 

June 8 and June 22 

June 9 and June 23 
June 1 1 and June 2 5 

June 1 2 and June 26 

June 1 3 and June 27 
June 1 4 and June 28 

June 1 5 and June 29 



/3 Crucis : a Pavonis. ., 
a Scorpii : € Sagittarii. 



S ArjTus : a Pavonis. 



a Crucis : a Pavonis 

a Trianguli Australis : A Scorpii. 



y Argus : a Pavonis 

a Trianguli Australis : 6 Scorpii... 
A. Scorpii : 6 Scorpii 



a Ursac Majoris : a Aquilpe 
jS Centauri : a Pavonis 



y Crucis : a A(]uilie 



/i Crucis : a Aquilne l'5 : 0-9 

a Scorpii : a Pavonis i'3 : 2"0 

a Trianguli Australis : e Sagittarii i '9 : i'9 



17 : 1-9 
1-3 : 0-1 



1*5 : 2'o 
1-3 : 1-9 



2 o : 2"0 



ro : 2-0 
1-9 : 1-8 



ic) : 2-0 
1*9 : 2-0 

I -8 : 2-0 



2-0 : o'9 
0'8 : 2'o 



r6 : o' 



a Trianguli Australis : a Lyrsc... 
A Scorpii : e Sagittarii 



I "9 : o-i 

1-8 : I '9 

6 Scorpii : c Sagittarii '• z'o : I'C) 



a Crucis : a A(xuilse. 



a UrsfB Majoris : a Cygni. 

/i^ Centauri : a Aquil* 

A Scorpii : a Lyra?- 

Scorpii : a Lyroe 



j3 xVrgus : a Pavonis. 
y Crucis : a Gruis... 



ro : 0-9 



2'0 

0-8 


13 

0-9 


69 
96 


1-8 


0"I 


77 


2-0 


0"I 


83 


17 


2'0 


53 


1-6 


1-9 


72 



71 

72 



53 
26 



68 



52 
33 



76 

27 
6 



100 
45 

108 

106 

51 

37 

1 10 
1 1 

13 

107 



Look in Star Distance List for the ist Star of the pair in bold type. 



14 



STARS AND SEXTANTS. 



EPHEMERIS, 1904. 



Date. 



June 23 



Distance available 
between 



June 1 6 and June 30 



June 24 ' June 17 and July i 



June 25 



June 26 



June 18 and Julv 2 



June 19 and July 3 



June 27 June 20 and July 4 



June 28 June 21 and July 5 



June 29 June 22 and July 6 



July 2 ' June 2 5 and July 9 



July 3 1 June 26 and July 10 



July 7 



July 8 



June 30 and July 14 



July I and July i 5 



July 9 j July 2 and July 1 6 



Star Pair. 



Names. 



a Eridani : ft Centauri 
e Arfjus : a Pavonis 



Mags. 



Approxi- 
mate 
Distance. 



0-5 : 0-8 
17 : 2"o 



a. Scorpii : a Aquila? i'$ : 0*9 



ySCrucis : a Gruis I'j : I'g 

a Scorpii : a Cygni 1-3 : r3 



a Crucis : a Gruis 

ft Centauri : a Gruis 

a Trianguli Australis : a Pavoni.'^ 

A Scorpii : a Pavonis 

e Sagittarii : a Lyra? 



ro : 1-9 
o'8 : i-g 
i"9 : 2'o 
i"8 : 2"o 
r9 : o'l 



A Scorpii : a AquiliB . . . 

$ Scorpii : a Aquilte 

e Sagittarii : a Pavonis 



I "8 : 0*9 
2"o : o*9 
1 '9 : 2"o 



a Trianguli Australis : a Aquilre..! i'9 : 0-9 



A Scorpii : a Cygni ! 18 : i-^ 

A Scorpii : a Gruis i 8 : i 9 

e Sagittarii : a Aquike i "9 : o"9 



Scorjiii : a Cygni I'o : 1*3 



9 Scorpii : a Gruis. 
a Lyrie : a Pavonis 



2'o : 1-9 
o-i : 2'0 



62 
64 

60 

68 
92 



a Eridani : a Scorpii o'5:i"3 89 



Scorpii : a Pavonis : 2-0 : 2*0 



67 
63 
26 

3+ 
73 



/^ Argus : a Aquil?e I i7:o'9 118 

a Scorpii : a Gruis 1-3:1 "9 68 



56 
60 

30 



84 



93 

48 



97 



47 
98 



Look in Star Distance List for the ist Star of the pair in bold type. 



STAKS AND SEXTANTS. 



IS 



EPHEMERIS, 1904. 



Date. 



Distance available 
between 



July 10 



July 1 1 



July 1 2 



July 13 



July 14 

July 15 

July 1 6 

July 17 

July 18 

July 19 

July 23 

July 24 

July 25 

July 28 



July 3 and July r 



July 4 and July 1 8 



July 5 and July 1 9 



July 6 and July 20 



July 7 and July 21 

July 8 and July 22 
July 9 and July 23 
July 10 and July 24 

July 1 1 and July 2 5 
July 1 2 and July 26 
July 16 and July 30 

July 1 7 and July 3 1 

July 1 8 and Aug. i 
July 2 1 and jVug. 4 



Star Pair. 



Names. 



y Crucis : a Piscis Australis. 
a Scorpii : a Piscis Australis 



a Eridani : 6 Scorpii. 



Mags. 



I '6 : 1-3 
1-3 : 1-3 



Approxi- 
mate 
Distance 



a Trianguli Australis : a Gruis.... 



P Argils : a Gruis 

/3 Crucis : a Piscis Australis 

/? Centauri : a Piscis Australis. 
€ Sagittarii : a Gruis 



19: 1-9 



17: 1-9 

0-8 : 1-3 
1-9: 19 



a Eridani : a Trianguii Australis.! o"5 : 1-9 
e Sagittarii : a Cygni ' i -9 : i "3 



a Crucis : a Piscis Australis. 



a Lyrae : a Aquilse 



ro: 1-3 



a ITrsBB Minoris : a Ursae "Majoris z'l : 2-0 

a Eridani : e Sagittarii 0-5 : 1-9 

a Aquilee : a Pavonis 0^9 : 2 "o 



A Scorpii : a Piscis Australis... 
6 Scorpii : a Piscis Australis.... 
e Sagittarii : a Piscis Australis. 



1-8: 1-3 
2-0: 1-3 
1-9: 1-3 



a Lyrte : a Gruis o*i : \'() 

a Pavonis : a Gruis 20 ; 1-9 

i 

a Trianguii Aust. : u Piscis Aust. r9 : 1-3 

a AquilcE : a Gruis 0-9 : 1*9 



9' 

83 



44 

63 
88 
82 
43 



49 

86 



34 

29 

70 
66 

66 
63 



98 
18 



63 
64 



Look in Star Distance List fur the ist Star of tlie pair in bnlJ type. 



t6 



STAES AND SEXTANTS. 



EPHEMEPJS, 1904. 



Date. 



Distance available 
between 



Star Pair. 



Names. 



Mags. 



Jul}^ 29 I July 2 2 and Aug. 5 



July 30 



Aug. 2 



Aug. 3 



Aug. 4 



AuR. 6 



Aug. 7 



Aug. I o 



Auq:. 12 



Aug. 13 



Aug. 1 4 



Aug. 15 



Aug. 23 



Aug. 27 



July 23 and Aug. 6 



July 26 and Aug. 9 



July 27 and Aug. 10 



July 2 8 and Aug. 1 1 



July 30 and Aug. 13 



July 31 and Aug. 14 



Aug. 3 atid Aug. 17 



Aug. 5 and Aug. 19 



Auff. 6 and Aug. 20 



Aug. 7 and Aug. 2 1 



Au<'. 8 and Auc. 22 



Aug. 16 and Aug. 30 



a Ursse Minoris : e Ursse IMajoris 



Approxi- 
mate 
Distance. 



35 



a Lyrse : a Cygni o*i : r3 

a Pavonis : a Cygni ' 2-0 : i'^ 



a Eridani : a Pavonis. 



j3 Argus . a Piscis Australis , 
a Aquilse : a Cygni 



a Pavonis : a Piscis Australis. 



a Eridani : a Aquilre 

a Lyrae : a Piscis Australis. 



a Aquila) : a Piscis Australis. 



a Ursae Minoris : rj Vvsx ■\Iajorii 



a Cygni : a Gruis , 



8 Arcrus : a Piscis Australis. 



a UrssB Minoris : a Aquiliu. 
e Argus : a Piscis Australis. 
a Gruis : a Piscis Australis . 



a Eridani : a Gruis. 



a Cygni : a Piscis Australis. 



Aug. 20 and Sept. 3 y Argus : c Argus 
y Argiis : 8 Argus . 



c'5 : 2'0 



17: i'3 
0-9: 1-3 



2-0 : 13 



0-5 : 0-9 
o-i : 1-3 



0-9: 1-3 



2T : 19 



13 : 19 



2-0 : 1-3 



2'i : 0'9 
17 : 13 
1-9: 1-3 



0-5 : 1-9 



1-3 : 1-3 



1-9: 17 
i'() : 2"o 



24 

102 



40 



79 

38 



38 



96 
9' 



59 



41 



94 



81 
85 



33 



81 



12 
9 



Look in Star Distance List for the ist Star of the pair in bold type. 



STAES AND SEXTANTS. 



17 



EPHEMERIS, 1904. 



Date. 



Aug. 28 



Distance available 
between 



Aug. 2 1 and Sept. 4 



Aug. 29 Aug. 22 and Sept. 5 



Sept. 



Sept. 20 



Sept. 21 



Aug. 2 9 and Sept. 12 



Sept. I 3 and Sept. 2 7 



Sept. 1 4 and Sept. 28 



S(ipt. 22 I Sept. I 5 and Sept. 29 



Sept. 24. 



Sept. 28 



Sept. 30 



Oct. 5 



Oct. 6 



Sept. 1 7 and Oct. i 



Sept. 21 and Oct. 5 



Sept. 23 and Oct. 7 



Sept. 28 and Oct, 12 



Sept. 29 and Oct. 1 3 



Oct. 7 Sept. 30 and Oct. 14 



Oct. 8 



Oct. I o 



Oct. I and Oct. 1 5 



Oct. 3 and Oct. 17 



Star Pair. 



Kame.s. 



Mags. 



Approxi- 
mate 
Distance, 



y Argfis : a Piscis Austral 



a Ursae Minoris : a Lyrre 



19: 1-3 



/3 Canis Majoris : aTrianguli Australia ; 2*0 : I'9 



ft Ursae Minoris : a Piscis Aust. 
e Cani.s ^Nlajoris : a Gruis 



(3 Canis Majori.s : a Pavoni.s 
e Ursse Majoris : a Cygni ... 



a Persei : a Aquilae 

a Ursse Majoris : a Lyrae. 



8 Canis Majoris : a Grui.- 



f3 Orionis : a Pavonis . 



a Persei : a Gruis , 



a Aurigre : a Aquil;e. 



a Persei : a Pisci.s Aiistralis 

c Caiiis Majoris : a I'iscis Australi.s 

/3 Orionis : a Gruis 



j3 Canis Majoris : a Gruis 



e Orionis : a Pavonis 
^ Orionis ; a Pavonis 



2-1 : 13 
1-6 : 1-9 



2'0 : 2-0 
1-8: 1-3 



i-9:o-9 
2-0 : o'l 



2-0 : 1-9 



0'3 : 2-0 



1-9: 19 



0*2 : o'9 



1-9: 1-3 
1-6 : 1-3 



0-3 : 1-9 



20 : 1*9 



I '7 : 2'0 

2"0 : 2"0 



9+ 



2*1 : 0"i 52 



9' 



119 
93 



lOI 

66 



66 



96 



104 



118 



'15 



99 

98 



95 



98 



113 
i'3 



Look in Star Distance List for the ist Star of the pair in 1)ohl type. 



1 8 



STAES AND SEXTANTS. 



EPHEMERIS, 1904. 



Date. 



Distance available 
between 



Oct. 1 1 Oct. 4 and Oct. 1 8 



Oct. 14. Oct. 7 and Oct. 21 



Oct. 15 Oct. 8 and Oct. 22 



Oct. 17 



Oct. 10 and Oct. 24 



Oct. 18 I Oct. 1 1 and Oct. 25 



Oct. 19 Oct. 12 and Oct. 26 



0( t. 21 Oct. 14 and Oct. 28 



Oct. 22 Oct. 15 and Oct. 29 



Oct. 23 Oct. 16 and Oct. 30 



Oct. 25 Oct. 18 and Nov. i 



Oct. 30 Oct. 23 and Nov. 6 



Nov. I Oct. 25 and Nov. 8 



Nov. 2 Oct. 26 and Nov. 9 



Star Pair. 



Names. 



a Tauri : a Gruis 

/SOrionis : a Piscis Austialis. 



Mags. 



Approxi- 
mate 
Distance. 



II : 1*9 

03 : J-3 



a Ursse Minoris : a Cygni 2-1 : 1-3 

a Tauri : a Piscis Australis i-i : 1-3 

( Orionis : a Gruis I 2-0 : i -9 



y Orionis : a Pavonis 

£ Orionis : a Gruis 

/3 Canis Majoris : a Piscis Australis 



17 : 2-0 
17:19 
2-o: 1-3 



a Aurigse : a Piscis Australis 0-2 : 1*3 

y Orionis : a Gruis 1 17: 19 

17:1-3 



€ Orionis : a Piscis Australis. 



( Orionis : a Piscis Australis. 



y Orionis : a Piscis Australis. 



/3 Tauri : a Piscis Australis. 



a Persei : a Lyrae... 
a Persei : a Cygni.. 
a Orionis : a Gruis. 



20: 1-3 



17: 1-3 



1-8: 1-3 



r9 : o-i 

1-9: 13 

i-o-r4 : 1-9 



a Orionis : a Piscis Australis !i ■o-r4 : 1-3 



a Eridani : a Persei , 



a Eridani : y Argus 

y Gemiuorum : a Piscis Austialis. 



a Crucis : /3 Crucis. 



a Eridani : a Tauri. 
a Tauri : a Cygni... 



05 : 1-9 



0-5 : 1-9 
1-9: 1-3 



i-o : 1-5 



05 : n 
II : 13 



107 
90 



45 

9+ 

104 

118 

104 

98 



114 

108 
98 



98 



99 



82 

63 
114 

106 



109 



55 
119 



82 
97 



Look in Star Distance List for the ist Star of the pair in bold type. 



STARS AND SEXTANTS. 



19 



EPHEMERIS, 1904. 



Date. 



Distance available 
between 



Star Pair. 



Nanios, 



Mags. 



Approxi- 
mate 
Distance. 



Nov. 5 

Nov. 8 

Nov. 1 
Nov. 1 1 

Nov. 1 2 

Nov. 14 

Nov. 17 
Nov. 18 
Nov. 1 9 

Nov. 24 

Nov. 25 



Oct. 29 and Nov. 12 

Nov. I and Nov. 1 5 

Xov. 3 and Nov. 17 
Nov. 4 and Nov. 18 

Nov. 5 and Nov, 1 9 

Nov. 7 and Nov. 2 1 

Nov. 10 and Nov. 24 
Nov. 1 1 and Nov. 2 5 
Nov. 12 and Nov. 26 

Nov. 17 and Dec. i 
Nov. 1 8 and Dec. 2 



a Eridani : ft Orionis. 
a Tauri : a Lynx? 



y Orionis : a Cygni 



a Eridani : a Aurigse. 
a Eridani : y Orionis. 

a Eridani : e Orionis . 
a Eridani : t, Orionis. 



a Eridani : /3 Tauri. 
f3 Tauri : a Cygni... 



a Orionis : a Cygni 

a Eridani : (3 Canis Majoris . 



a Eridani : a Orionis 

a Eridani : e Canis Majoris 
a Aurigae : a Lyrse 



a Eridani : 8 Canis Majoris. 
y8 Tauri : a Lyrse 



a Persei : a Tauri. 



Nov. 28 Nov. 21 and Dec. 5 



Nov. 30 



Dec. I 



a Eridani : y Geminorum 

a Persei ; (3 Orionis 

y Geminorum : a Cygni . . 



Nov. 23 and Dec. 7 



Nov. 24 and Dec. 8 



a UrssB Minoris : a Persei. 



a Persei : a Aurigae. 



0-5 :o-3 
II : 01 



a Aurigae : a Cygni 0-2 : 1-3 



17 : 1-3 

0-5 : 0*2 
0-5 : 17 

0-5 : 17 
o*5 : 2*o 

0-5 : 1-8 
1-8: 1-3 

i'0-i*4 : I "3 

o*5 : 2*o 



0-5 : ro-i-4 
0-5 : 1-6 
o"2 : o"i 



o"5 : 2*0 
1-8 :o-i 



1*9 : ri 



0-5 :i-9 
i-9:o-3 
1-9 : 1-3 



21 : 1-9 



64 

118 



"3 

78 



73 

73 



9+ 

115 

65 



«3 
61 

93 



64 
I II 



36 



96 

63 
1 12 



39 



1*9 : 0*2 19 



Look in Star Distance List for the ist Star of the pair in bold type. 



20 



STAES AND SEXTANTS. 



EPHEMERIS, 1904. 



Date. 



Distance available 
between 



Star Pair. 



Names. 



Mags. 



Approxi- 
mate 
Distance. 



Page.' 



Dec. 2 Xov. 25 and Dec. 9 

Dec. 3 Xov. 26 and Dec. 10 

I 

Dec. 5 Nov. 28 and Dec. 12 



Dec. 6 

Dec. 7 

Dec. 8 

Dec. 9 

Dec. 10 

Dec. 1 1 



Xov. 29 and Dec. 13 
Nov. 30 and Dec. 1 4 
Dec. I and Dec. 1 5 

Dec. 2 and Dec. 16 

Dec. 3 and Dec. 17 
Dec. 4 and Dec. 1 8 



Dec. 12 Dec. 5 and Dec. 19 



a Persei : y Ononis. 
a Persei : f3 Tauri , 
a Persei : c Orionis 



a Persei : t, Orionis , 
a Tauri : fS Orionis 



1-9: 17 
1-9 : 1-8 
1-9: 17 

1-9 : 2'0 
ri :o-3 



a TJrsae Minoris : a Tauri. 

a Tauri : a Aurigfe 

a Tauri : y Orionis 



2*1 

I "I 
I I 



II 

0-2 
17 



a Persei : a Orionis i 

a Tauri : /? Tauri 



a Tauri : € Orionis. 
a Tauri : ( Orionis 



9 : ro-i*4 
i-i : 1-8 



ri : 17 
II : 2*o 



a Persei : y8 Canis Majoris. 

a Aurigpe : /S Orionis 

/3 Orionis : y Orionis 



a Eridani : a Geminorum , 

(3 Orionis : /3 Tauri 

(3 Orionis : € Orionis 

jS Orionis : ^ Orionis 



a Tauri : a Orionis 



u Ursse Minoris : j3 Orionis 

a Pensei : y Geminorum 

a Tauri : ^ Canis INIajoris ... 

a Aurigae : y Orionis 

y Orionis : J3 Tauri 

a Geminorum : a Cygni 



1-9 

0"2 

0-3 
0-3 
o"3 



2'0 

0-3 

17 

2-0 

1-8 
17 

2"0 



II: i'0-r4 



2-1 

1-9 
II 

0-2 

17 
2"0 



o'3 

1-9 

2"0 

17 

p8 
i'3 



a Persei : « Canis Majoris \ i'9 : i-6 

a Aurigae : ^ Tauri 0-2 : r8 

a Auriga) : e Orioiii.'* 0*2 : 17 

(3 Orionis : a Orionis 0*3 : ro-r4 

y Orionis : e Orionis 17 : 17 

y Orionis : ^ Orionis | 17:2-0 



50 
31 

58 

60 
26 



73 
31 
16 



53 

17 

23 
24 

78 
5+ 
15 

116 

37 
9 
9 

21 

98 
51 
43 
40 
22 

lOI 



92 
17 
47 
19 



Look in Star Distance List for the 1st Star of the ])air in bold type. 



STARS AND SEXTANTS. 



2 r 



EPHEMERIS, 1904. 



Date. 



Distance available 
between 



Star Pair. 



Names. 



Maws. 



Aj>i)roxi- 

inate 
Distance, 



Patre. 



Dec. 1 3 



Dec. 14 



Diic. 6 and Dec. 20 



I )ec. 7 and Doc. 2 i 



Dec. I i 



Dec. 16 



Dec. 1 7 



Dec. 18 



Dec. 8 and 1 )ec. 2 2 



Dec. 9 and Dec. 2 3 



Dec. 10 and Dec. 24 



Dec. 1 1 and Dec. 25 



Dec. 19 ' Dec. 12 and Dec. 26 



Dec. 20 



Dec. 13 and Dec. 27 



a Ursse Minoris : y Orionis 
a Peisei : 8 Canis MajorLs .. 

a Taiiri : f3 Argus 

a Aurigie : ^ Orionis 

/i Tauri : e Orionis 

/3 Tauri : ^ Orionis 

</. Ursae Minoris : a Auriga- 
a Ursae Minoris : ^ Tauri... 

a Tauri : y Geminorum 

;S (ieminorum : a Cygui 

y ArgHs : a Pa vonis 

a Ursse Minoris : e Orionis 
a Ursse Minoris : ( Orionis 

a Eridani : y Crucis 

a Tauri : e Canis Majoris ... 

a Aurigre : a Orionis 

y Orionis : a Orionis 

/3 Tauri : a Orionis 

/3 Orionis : (3 Canis Majoris 

€ Orionis : a Orionis 

^ Orionis : a Orionis 

a Ursse Minoris : a Orionis 

a Persei : y Argils 

a Tauri : 8 Canis Majoris.. 

a Tauri : c Argus 

y Orionis : [3 Canis Majoris, 

a Eridani : /? Crucis 

a Persei : a Geminorum 

a AurigtB : (3 Canis Majoris 
/3 Orionis : y Geminorum ... 

/i^ Tauri : /3 Canis Majoris. 
€ Orionis : f3 Canis Majoris. 

a Persei : [3 Geminorum 

a Tauri : a Geminorum 

^Tauri :y Geminorum 

^ Orionis : /? Canis Majoris. 



21 
19 
II 

0-2 

1-8 
1-8 



17 

2'0 



r 



2'0 

•7 

2"0 



2-1 : 0-2 
2-i : 1-8 
11 : 1-9 
1-2 : 1-3 
1-9 : 2-0 



21 

2-1 



•7 

2'0 

o'5 : 1-6 

II : 16 

0'2 : I-0-I-4 

17 : I •0-1-4 

1-8 : ro-i'4 

0*3 : 2-0 
17:1 c-i^ 
2-0 : 1 •0-1-4 

2-1 : ro-1'4 
19: 19 
II : 20 
l-i : 17 
17 : 2"o 



1-5 

2'0 
2'0 

0-3 : 1-9 



1-9 

0-2 



l-« : 2-0 
I 7 : 2-0 



19 
ri 

1-8 

2-0 



I 2 

2-0 

2'0 



83 

9' 

99 

48 

30 
31 



43 
61 
29 
106 
76 



9' 
91 
65 

57 

39 

8 

22 



19 
10 

10 

82 

57 
89 
28 

63 

49 

66 

32 



49 
20 

53 
43 

20 

'9 



Look iu Star Distance List for the ist Star of tlie pair in bold type. 



O 9 



STARS AND SEXTANTS. 



EPHEMERIS, 1904. 



Date, 



' Distance available 
between 



Star Pair. 



Names. 



Mags. 



Approxi- 
mate 
Distance. 



Dec. 2 1 



Dec. 22 



Dec. 23 



Dec. 24 



Dec. 



Dec. 26 



Dec. 14. and Dec. 28 



Dec. 15 and Dec. 29 



Dec. 16 and Dec. 30 



Dec. 17 and Dec. 31 



Dec. 1 8 and Jan. i 



Dec. 19 and Jan. 2 



a Tauri : /3 Geminoiurn 

a Tauri : y Argils , 

a Aurigse : y Geminorum... 
/3 0rionis : e Canis Majoris. 
y Orionis : y (ieminorum..., 
« Orionis: y Geminorum.... 



11 
\\ 

0'2 

0-3 

17 

>7 



1-2 
19 

1-9 
1-6 
19 
19 



a Persei : a Ursse Majoris rg : 20 

a Tauri : 8 Argds i • i : 2 'o 

/S Orionis : 8 Canis Majoris o'3 : 2*0 

^ Orionis : y Geminorum 20 : r9 



a Eridani : a Crucis 0-5 : i -o 

a Aurigte : € Canis Majoris 0*2 : r6 

y Orionis : c Canis Majoris 1*7 : r6 

^ Tauri : c Canis Majoris r8 : i-6 

a Orionis : ^ Canis Majoris 1 •0-1*4 • ^'o 



a Aurigge : 8 Canis Majoris o'2 : 2*0 

/3 Orionis : a Geminorum 0-3 : 2*0 

y Orionis : 8 Canis Majoris 17 : 2*0 

c Orionis : e Canis Majoris 17 : i'6 

a Orionis : y Geminorum 10- 1*4 : r9 



a Ursse Minoris : y8 Canis ^[ajoris i-\ 

a TJrsae Minoris : y Geminorum..! 21 

a Tauri : a Ursa; Majoris i • i 

ft Orionis : ft Argus ! 0-3 

y Orionis : a Geminorum 17 

ft Tauri : 8 Canis Majoris I i-8 

c (Jrionis : 8 Canis Majoris 17 

^ Orionis : € Canis Majoris I'o 



a Aurigse : a Geminorum... 
ft Orionis : ft Geminorum.. 

ft Orionis : e ArgHs 

ft Tauri : a Geminorum 

c Orionis : a Geminorum.... 
t, Orionis : 3 Canis Majoris. 



02 

0-3 

o'3 
1-8 
17 

2-0 



2"0 
19 

2"0 

17 
2"0 
2"0 
2"0 

1-6 



2"0 
1*2 



I ■ 



2'0 
2'0 

2"0 



+5 
80 

3+ 

32 
20 

23 



57 
88 

33 

23 



59 
78 
42 
62 
26 



77 
52 

3+ 



108 
73 
79 
72 
40 
60 
3 + 
33 



30 

SI 

62 
28 
43 
32 



Look in Star Distance List for the ist Star of the pair in bold type. 



STARS AND SEXTANTS. 



23 



EPHEMERIS, 1904. 



Date. 



Distance available 
between 



Star Pair. 



Names. 



Mag^. 



Approxi- 
mate 
Distance. 



Dec. 27 



Dec. 20 and Jan. 3 



Dec. 28 Dec. 21 andJan. 4 



Dec. 29 



Dec. 30 



Dec. 3 1 



Dec. 22 and Jan. 5 



Dec. 23 and Jan. 6 



Dec. 24 and Jan. 7 



tt Persei : c Ursoc Majoris.. 
y Ononis : /? Geminorum .. 

y Ononis : c Argus 

/i Tauri : (i Argfls 

C, Orionis : a Geminorum... 
a Orionis : e Cams Majoris. 



P Canis Majoris : y Geminorum. 



a Aurigffi : ji Geminorum ... 

P Orionis : y Argus 

y Orionis : y8 Argus 

fi Tauri : ft Geminorum 

(3 Tauri : e ArgHs 

€ Orionis : (i Geminorum .., 
a Orionis : 8 Canis Majoris. 



1-9: 

17 : 

17 : 

18 : 
z'o : 

ro-i 4 



1-8 
12 

17 
17 

2"0 

: 1-6 



2-0 : I "9 



0-2 
0-3 



a Tauri : a Crucis 

a Tauri : c Ursie Majoris . 

a Auriga?, : £ Argds 

ft Tauri : y Argus 

^ Orionis : /? Geminorum 
a Ononis : a Geminorum . 



a Aurigse : y Argus . 
y Orionis : y Argtis. 
e Orionis : c ArgQs . 



a UrssB Minoris : c Canis Majoris 

a Persei : tj Ursse Majoris 

fi Orionis : 8 Argils 

a Ursie Majoris 

y Argds 

P Argds 

e Argils 

/3 Geminorum 



fi Orionis 
c Orionis : 
€ Orionis : 
t, Orionis : 
a Orionis : 



I 0-1 4 



I 2 

19 
17 
I 2 

•7 

Z'O 



1*1 
I'l 

0-2 

1-8 

2-0 



I'O 

1-8 

17 

1-9 

1-2 



I •0-1-4 • ^'° 



0'2 

17 

17 



2'I 
1-9 

o"3 
o'3 
17 
17 

2-0 



I '9 

1-9 

17 

1-6 
1-9 

2'0 
2 O 
19 

17 
17 



ro-r4 : r 



Look in Star Distance List for tlie ist Star of the pair iu bold type. 



70 
40 

75 
106 

43 
39 
35 



3+ 
5 + 
85 
31 
95 
43 
38 



117 

94 
1 12 

84 
42 

34 



lOI 

65 
67 



119 

79 
62 

96 

57 
77 
65 
33 



24 



STARS AND SEXTANTS. 



DISTANCES OF THE STAR PAIRS, Etc. 



star Pair. 



Distance. 



R.A. and 

Dec. of 

Fictitious 

Star. 



Star Pair. 



Distance. 



R.A. and 

Dec. of 

Fictitious 

Star. 



a Ursae Minoris. 

{Pulana) il' 24I". 
X. 88° 48', 
and : — 



o Persei {Mirfak) 

a Tauri (Aldebaran) 
a AurigiX' (Capella)... 

^ Orioiiis [Ricjel) 

7 Orionis {Bcllatrix) 



)8 Tauri {Xuth) 

e Orionis {Alnilam) 

^Orionis 

a Orionis (Betelyucse) 

yS Cauis JLijoris {Mirzam).... 



3925 21 
7251 23 
43 26 25 

97 38 40 
83 658 

60 51 27 
9041 34 
91 26 39 

82 7 48 
1073347 



y Gcrmwoxvim. [Alhena) 7315 2 

€ Caiiis Majoris (^(/ara) ' 1184048 

5 Can is M;i juris j 116 7 50 

575550 
61 49 41 



o Geniinorum (Cador) 
fi Geminorum {Pollu.'-) 



a Leouis {I'egulus) 

o Ursae ilajoris {JJubhe) 

e Ursas Majoris {Alioth) 

a Virginis {Spica) 

T; Urste filajoris {Benetnasch) . 



78 20 8 

28 42 23 

See 

See 

See 



a Scorpii (.i^Jitorei) 117 416 

a Lyrse {Vega) j 51 34 46 

a Aquilic (AUair) ' 811622 

a Cygni {Deneh) 44 41 33 

a I'iscis Australis {FoinaUtaut) 119 1043 



a Eridani. 



h 


111 


9 


20 


10 


31 


II 


14 


II 


9 


II 


21 


II 


23 


II 


31 


1 1 


36 


1 1 


51 


12 


17 


12 


34 


12 


52 


13 


2 


1332I 


13 


42 


16 


4 


17 


3 


page I 


pa 


He 


pa 


ge 


22 


17 ' 



[Arhcrnar] \^ 34"^. 
S. 57° 43'- 



and : — 



o Persei {Mirfak) .... 
a 'J'auri {Aldeharan) 
0. Auriga' {Capella) ... 

fi Orionis {Rigcl) 

7 Orionis {Bellatrix). 



^Tmv\{Nath) 

€ Orionis {Alnilam) 

f Orionis 

a Orionis {Betelguese) 

H Cauis Majoris {MirMin). 



7 Geminorum {Alhcna) .. 
i Canis Majoris {Adara). 

5 Cauis Majoris 

a Geminorum {Castor).... 
/3 Geminorum {Pollux)... 



109 20 5 
82 29 25 

11249 57 
64 1943 
7824 8 

98 20 9 

73 4 15 
7259 o 
825330 
64 52 4 

95 55 2 

60 48 52 

64 10 31 

1.559 o 

114 16 44 



iN 
iN 
I N 
iN 
iN 

iN 

I N 
iN 
iN 
iN 

1 N 
ii\ 
I A' 

I N 

iN 

I N 

iN 
38. 
38. 
39- 



I S 
o 30 ' I S 

M5j '« 
2 34 ! I s 

4 54: iS 



8 32 



9 47 
II 26 



10 26 

11 32 

" 37 
I 32 
3 2 



30 S 

31 S 
I s 

29 s 

12 26 31 S 



II 50 

14 15 

14 9 



9S 
21 s 
19 s 

28 s 

27 s 

23 s 

28 8 
28 S 
288 
32 8 



a Eridani — continued. 



7 Argus 5525 8 

e Argus ■ 4750 8 

5 Argus I 53 23 58 

3 Argus 4432 7 

a Leonis {Regulus) i 119 51 50 

a Crucis ' 58 53 11 

64 52 56 

623934 

III 33 18 

See 



7 Crucis. 

/8 Crucis . . 

a Virginis {Spica). 
Centauri 



o Scorpii {Anfares) 88 53 

a Trianguli Austialis ' 49 5 



A Scorpii. 

d Scorpii 

i Sagittarii. 



a Aquilse {AUair) 

o Pavonis 

a Cygni {Deneb) , 

a Gruis 

a. Piscis Australis (Fomulhaut 

a Persei. 

{Mirfak) 3I' 18'". 
N. 49° 31'. 
and : — 

a Tauri {Aldebaran) 

a Aurigfe {Capella) 

/8 Orionis (liigel) 

7 Orionis [Bellatrix) 

fi Tauri {Nath) 



7327 3 
675832 
70 29 11 

9541 IS 

40 652 

1 19 32 10 

325058 

39 655 



€ Orionis {Alnilam) 

^ Orionis 

a Orionis {Betelguese) 

/8 Canis Majoris {Mirzam). 
7 Geniinorum {Alheiia) 



i Canis M.ajoris {Adara).. .. 

5 Canis Majoris 

a Geniinorum {Cadur) 

^ Geniinorum {I'olla.r) 

7 Argus 

a Leonis {llegulus) 

a XJvsis. Majoris (Dubhe) 

6 Ursic Majoris (.4 dw/A) 

7) Ursne Majoris {Benelnasch) 
a Lyrte {Vega) 

a Aquilie {AUair) 

a Cygni {Dcneb) 

a Gruis 

a Piscis Australis {Fomalhaut) 



36 20 50 
19 526 
624954 

50 20 17 
31 2245 

58 21 21 
5930 7 

52 49 28 
7824 18 

51 1054 

92 I 55 
90 58 46 
49 o 24 

53 1924 
114 58 10 

87 49 26 

565744 
693953 
78 40 34 
8145 4 

97 46 18 
62 41 19 

11821 28 

98 58 20 



h 


ni 


16 


9 


s 


I 


17 





5 59 


1535 


7 


1 


19 


I 


7 


6 


19 


i8 


[lage 


21 


47 


8 


42 


22 


11 


22 


5 


22 


55 


z 


4 


22 


57 


4 


22 



26 s 

21 N 

21S i 

14N 
29 S I 

5N 

7S 
4N 
3S 
40. 

18N 

iiS i 

22N 

21 N 

26 N 

3iN^ 

27 Ni 



7I32N 
338 27 N 



10 52 

15 '5 

1057 



18N 

40 N 
20 N 



11 32 25 N 
1245 33N 



11 28 
32 
7 

II 42 
3 22 

1 1 44 

12 o 
1532 

1534 
II 52 

16 40 
742 
8 10 
826 

23 14 

I 22 
o 9 
633 
615 



24 N 

25 N] 
29 N} 

26 N 
36N 

27 N' 

28 N 
39 N 
39 N 

27 N 

37N 
19S 
138 
98 
23S 

37S 
3.S 

28 S 
31S 



Look for the Star with the smaller R.A. in bold type. 



STARS AND SEXTANTS. 



25 



DISTANCES OF THE STAR PAIRS, Etc. 



star Pair. 



Distance. 



K. A. and 

Dec. of 

Fictitious 

Star. 



Star Pair. 



Distance. 



I!. A. and 

Dec. of 

Fictitious 

Star. 



a Tauri. 

{Aldeharan) 4I' 30'" 
N. 16° 19'. 
and :— 

a Aurigte (Capella)... 

j8 Orionis (liigel) 

7 Orionis {BellairLr) 

/3 Tauri (Nath) 

e Orionis {Alirilam) . 



^Orionis 

a Orionis {Betchjuefic) 

$ Canis Majoris (JA>~«?«) 
7 Geminoruni [AUiena)... 
e Canis Majoris {Adam). . 



5 Canis Majoris 

a Geminoruni [Castor) 
Geminoruni [PoUnx) 
7 Argus 

6 Argus 



S Argus 

J3 Argus 

o Leonis {Rrgaliis) 

a Ursffi Majoris (iJahhc) 
a Crucis 



7 Crucis 

6 Ursae Majoris {Allotli) 

Tj Urt^pe ilajoris (/Jcnrfnasch).. 

a Lyrre {J^cga) 

o Cygni {Bench) 



o Gruis 

a Piscis Australis {Fomalhaat) 

a Aiirigse. 

{Capdhi) 5'' 10'". 
K. 45° 54'. 
and : — 



/8 Orionis (Ti/grf/) 

7 Orionis {Bellatrij;). 

P Tauri {Nath) 

i Orionis {Alailam). 
^Orionis 



a Oiionis {Betehjuese) 

fi Cunis Majoris (J/ir:'n;() 
7 Geminoium {Alhcnu).... 
« Canis Majoris {Adara) .. 
S Canis ilajoris 

a Geminoruni (Castor) 

j3 Geminoruni {Pollux) 

7 Argus 

e Argus 

8 Argus 



3041 44 
26 29 54 

154529 
16 45 22 
23 8 2 

2425 50 
21 23 31 
43 2054 
29 10 23 
57 4 4 

564054 
43 II 48 
45 MS 
794343 
88 42 44 

88 29 19 
98 3522 
80 8 18 18 47 



h ni 
10 I 2 

10 56 

11 54 
9 34 

II 26 

11 27 

12 52 
1 1 22 

550 
II 17 

II 27 

48 

25 
1 1 14 



13 s 

22 N 
51N 
37 S 
41 N 

42N 
64 N 
37N 
73 S 
36N 

40 N 
56S 
62 S 
33 N 
24 N 



7843 3^ 
117 3 44 

1191855 

93 56 4 
104 22 36 
117 5254 

9657 34 

106 39 27 
93 32 15 



See 
3942 5 
172959 

47 24 28 

48 1448 

3929 2 
65 41 20 
34 5 6 

782747 
7642 38 

2959 3 

34 15 15 

100 43 14 

112 9 40 

10953 18 



8 30 N 

52 18N 

71N 

26 S 

26N 



956 

'I 5 

[I 9 
958 
9 59 



927 
8 50 



page 
II 24 
II 32 
II 32 

II 37 

11 58 

12 2 

13 4 

12 20 
12 28 



32N 

26 S 

25 S 

25 N 
37 N 

42 S 
55 S 



33- 

3 N 
6N 
6N 

7N 

12N 
3N 

25 N 
16N 
18N 



15 50J42N 
1535 42N 



1237 
12 24 
1239 



20 N 
17N 

21 N 



a Aurigae — continued. \ 

a Leonis (Iic</ulus) 69 35 50 

a Ur.sre Majoris (/'(/'//(fi) 4917 5 

€ Ursffi Majoris (^//o//t) 64 9 8 

7] Urste Majoris {Bctirtnasili)...' 74 25 23 

a Lyroe {Vaja) 93 19 39 

a Aquila? {Altair) 1151335 

a Cygni {/Jcncb) 78 10 33 

a Piscis Australis [Fomalhaat,) 113 56 16 

(3 Orionis. 

{Riycl) 5I1 10™. 

S. 8° 19'. 
and : — , 

7 Orionis {Bellatrix) 14 47 22 

k Tauri [Nath) 36 55 22 

e Orionis [Alnilam) | 85020 

COrioiiis j 9 233 

a Orionis [Bctelguesr) I 18 36 20 



)3 Canis Majoris [Mirzam) | 19 13 47 

7 Geminoruni [Alhena).... 
6 Canis ilajoris {Adara) .. 

S Canis ilajoris 

o Geminoium {Castor) 



Geminoruni {Pollux). 

y Argus 

e Argus 

5 Argus 

6 Argus 



o Leonis {liegulus) 

a Ursfe Majoris {Duhhe) . 

a Crucis 

7 Crucis 

j8 Crucis 



e Ursae ilajoris (Alloth) 

a Virginis [Spica) 

/3 Centauri 

o Triauguli Australis .... 
a Pavonis 



a Gruis 

a Piscis Australis [Foiaa.lhant] 

y Orionis. 

{Bellatrix) ^^ 20'". 
N. 6° 1 6'. 
and : — 

/8 Tauri {Nath) 

e Orionis {Almlam) 

^ Oiionis 

a Orionis {Bctelguese) 

j3 Canis Majoris {Mirzam) 



32 4 19 
32 5 19 

323329 
52 12 19 

51 2254 

535258 
62 15 37 
62 20 19 

72 7 14 

75 45 36 
95 5655 
90 3849 

93 '440 

94 16 4 

no 33 39 
119 46 5 
loi 51 21 
102 38 20 
104 12 59 

95 4 45 
893555 



22 15 50 

8 2 32 

9 951 
7 31 47 

28 911 



i6 56 44N 
9 17 25 S 
9 26 23 S 



9 37 
2359 


21S 
iiS 


I 27 
56 
655 


28 S 
23 s 
41 s 



II 12 

II 9 

II 32 

II 40 

II 30 

10 17 

11 32 
1038 

10 26 

11 36 



II 40 42 S 



1049 
10 56 
1048 
10 56 



loS 
3S 
36 S 
44 s 
32 s 

58 N 
38 S 
46 N 
52N 
36 S 



36 N 
25 N 
32 N 
19N 



13 2|72S 

II 26 27 s 
10 56 26 N 



1055 
10 52 



II 29 32 S 

9 26 71 N 



31 N 
28 N 



10 56 

11 8 
11 22 

II 35 



II 20 

II 26 

I 30 

842 

II 35 



2N 
3N 

23 S 

40 s 
58 s 



I8N 

25 N 
81 S 

30 Nj 



Look for the Star with the smaller "R. A., in bold type. 



26 



STARS AND SEXTANTS. 



DISTANCES OF THE STAR PAIRS, Etc. 



star Pair. 



y Orionis — continued. 

y Oeniinorum (Alhcna) ... 
f Canis Majoris {Adara).. 

5 Ciinis Majoris 

a Geniinorum {Castor) 

/3 Geniinorum (Pollux).... 



Distance. 



7 Argus 

( Argus 

5 Argus 

j8 Argus ....„ 

a Leonis {Regulus) 



20 24 20 

41 5242 
41 12 49 

393243 
393830 

64 46 22 
743652 
73 45 35 
85 II 50 
695834 



R. A. and 
Dec. of 

Fictitious 
Star. 



h m 
1043 58 S 
II 35 32N 
II 41 36 N 

10 56 44 S 
1046 52 S 

11 35 30 X 

II 29 j22 N 

II 33 128 X 
II 27 18 N 
9 26 77 S 



a Ursaj Majoris (ZJiffe/tfl) 815249 11 8 27 S 

a Crucis j 102 34 49 11 34 ,27 N 

7 Crucis I 1041516113733N 

k Crucis ' 105 48 19 II 35 I30N 

€ Ursae Majoris (^/io</t) 9649 8 11 6 30 S 



7] Ursae Majoris {Benetnatsch) 

fi Centauri 

a Trianguli Austraiis 

a Pavonis 

o Cygni [Deneh) 



a Gruis 

a Piscis Austraiis {Fomalhaut) 



/? Tauri. 

{Nath) s^ 20"'. 

N. 28° 32' 
and : — 



( Orionis {Alnilam) 

^ Orionis 

a Orionis {Betelguese) 

/3 Canis Majoris {MLrzam). 
7 Geniinorum {AUiena).... 



107 3 35 
114 II 36 
11721 
1 18 29 49 
112 18 14 

1074249 
99 6 3 



295431 
3045 4 
22 16 23 
48 31 22 



II 4 
II 32 


32 S 
26 N 


II 22 


4N 


II 8 


27 s 


II 39 


35 X 



1057 
1037 



1 1 30 

•I 35 
II 58 
II 52 



2028 37 1347 



e Canis Majoris (.<4f^a/-a) 6140 8 

5 Canis Majoris 601255 

o Geminorum (Castor) I 274825 

6 Geminorum {Pollux) | 30 30 36 

7 Argus 8422 5 



12 7 
12 14 
7 22 
1826 
12 17 



€ Argus 95 18 38 

5 Argus I 93 3345 ji2 17 

/3 Argus 10623 53 ji I 57 

a Leonis {Regulus) ' 67 19 12 17 41 

a Urs;e Majoris {Duhhc) ' 62 26 34 10 14 



c Ursffi Majoris {Alioth) 

r) Ursae Majoris (j5enc<MascA)... 

a Lyrae (Fegra) 

a Cygiii {Bench) 

o Piscis Austraiis {Fomalhaut) 



7741 5 1014 

88 9 3 10 15 

110 37 30 1 1 48 

93 49 34 1226 

109 23 8 8 14 



41S 

59 S 



5N 

7N 

18N 

16N 

48 N 

21 N 

23N 

57S 

60 N 
24 N 

19N 

24 N 
16N 

61 N 

27 S 

27 S 

27 s 

I3N 

28 N 
52S 



Star Pair. 



Distance. 



Orionis. 



and 



{Alnilam) t,^ 31™. 
S. 1° 16'. 



a Orionis {Betelguese) 

^ Canis Majoris (Mirzam). 
7 Geniinorum (Alhcna) .... 
6 Canis Majoris (Aclara)... 
5 Canis Majoris 



a Geniinorum {Castor)... 
Geminorum {Pollu.r).. 

7 Arm'is 

e Argus 

5 Argus 



;8 Argus 

a hwnis {Beg ulns) 

o Ursfc Majoris {Dubhe) 

a Crucis 

7 Crucis 



;8 Crucis 

UrsiC Majoris {Alioth) 

a Virginis {Spica) 

7] Ursae Majoris {Benctnasch) . 
$ Centauri 



9 49 17 
20 16 22 
23 14 24 
34 058 
333252 

4321 58 

423542 
56 5039 
66 34 29 
6547 2 

77 10 5 
68 49 II 
871351 

94 35 10 
96 23 28 

975147 
10145 17 
116 25 23 
III 40 27 
106 10 26 



o Trianguli Austraiis 109 18 16 

a Pavonis ' 112 48 46 

o Gruis 103 54 16 

o Piscis Austraiis (i^o/na^/ia«0- 97 46 43 

^ Orionis. 

5I1 36"". 

S. 2° o'. 

and : — 

a Orionis {Betelguese) 

3 Canis Majoris (il/t>^aw() 19 2 4 

7 Geminorum (.^^/jcnr?) 23 642 

e Canis Majoris {Adara) 324634 

8 Canis Majoris 32 15 24 

Geminorum {Castor) 43 16 34 

j8 Geminorum (Po/Zmx) 4221 7 

7 Argus 5538 7 

Argus 65 28 15 

5 Argus 64 36 

j8 Argus 76 756 

a Leonis {Regulus) 675320 

a Ursae Majoris {Dubhe) 87 21 12 

a Crucis 9325 6 

7 Crucis 95 936 



R.A. and 
Dec. of 

Fictitious 
Stor. 



28 S 
33N 
38S 
34 N 
39N 

37S j 
43S 
31 X 
22 N 
28 N 



29 17N 

1 76 S 
33J26S 
29 27 N 
29 32 N 

29 29 N 

32[32S 

2 77N 

34 35S 

29 25N 

30 ! 5N' 

32 23 s 

35 40 S 
37 58S 



I 40 21 S 
I 30 32 N 
141 35S 
I 30 33 N 

I 27I38N 

' 39 35S 
I 39 42 S 
1 32 31 N 

;i 32 '22N 
30 28N 

:i 32 117N 
I75S 
138 ~ 

32 
I 29 



27 S 
27 N 
33N 



Look for the Star with the smaller R. A. in bold type. 



STARS AND SEXTANTS. 



27 



DISTANCES OF THE STAR PAIRS, Etc. 



Star Pair. 



; ^ Orionis— fo?i/mwe(/. 

;3 Cmcis 

6 Ursae Majoris {Alioth) 

o Virgiiiis {Spica) 

Tj Ursae Majoris {Benetnasch) . . 
fi Centauri 

o Trianguli Australis 

a Pavonis 

a Gruis 

o Piscis Australis {Fonialhaut) 



a Orionis. 

{Betelguese) s^ S°^- 
N. 7' 23'- 
and : — 

/3 Canis Majoris {3Iirzam).. 

y Geniiiiornni {Alhena) 

e Cauls Mnjoris {Adara) 

5 Caiiis Majoris 

o Geininorum (Castor) 

$ Getninorum {Pollux) 

y Argds 

f Argus 

5 Argus 

j8 Argus 

a Leonis [Recjulus) 

o Ursae Majoris {Duhhe) 

a Crucis 

y Crucis 

3 Crucis 

6 Ursae Majoris {Alioth) 

a Virginis {Spica) 

7j Ursae Majoris (Z/e;ie<Hasc/i) 

k Centauri 

o Trianguli Australis 

o Cygni (Dencb) 

o Gruis 

1 a Piscis Australis {Fomalhant) 



(3 Canis Majoris. 

{Mirzam) 6^ iS™. 

s. 17° 54'. 

and : — 

7 Geminoruni (Alhoia).. 
f Canis Majoris {Adara) 

5 Canis Majoris , 

a Geminorum (Castor) ... 
fi Geminorum (Pollux)... 



Distance. 



R.A. and 

Dec. of 

Fictitious 

Star. 



963949 " 30 
loi 45 48 II 40 
115 853 1052 

111 3550 1141 
105 I 47 II 30 

108 28 25 II 36 

112 34 58 II 39 
104 445 II 39 

9823 14 II 47 



26 15 26 

134439 
3927 36 
38 II 2 
33 4' 32 

33 1249 
62 17 21 

73 245 
71 27 29 



62 27 4 

772437 
100 9 18 
loi 549 
103 o 25 

91 5721 
II3245I 

loi 5550 
III 54 12 
11725 4 

115 29 50 
113 30 I 
106 8 18 



II 58 

II 22 

2 

6 
II 27 

11 20 

12 5 
12 o 
12 5 
II 58 

9 37 

11 35 

12 5 
12 10 
12 8 

II 31 

14 30 

11 29 

12 5 
II 52 



30 N 
32 S 

77 N 

35 S 
25 N 

6N 

22 S 
39 S 
58S 



15N 

44 S 
22 N 
28 N 
38S 

47 S 
25 N 
19N 
24 N 
16N 

77 S 
27 S 
27 N 

33 N 
30 N 

32 S 

79 N 

34 S 

27 N 
7N 



12 7 31 N 
II 25 40 S 
II 059S 



3433 16 1223 5S 

134437 " 24 34N 

13 3> 4 JO 55 46 N 

524439 1242 17 S 

50 8 55 12 50 22 S 



Star Pair. 



Distance. 



R.A. and 

Dec. of 

Fictitious 

Star. 



fS Canis Majoris — coiitd. 



y Argus 

e Argus 

S Argus 

j3 Argus 

a Leonis (Regulus) 



a Ursae 'M&lovi^ (Duhhc) 

o Crucis 

y Crucis • — 

3 Crucis 

€ Ursae Majoris (Alioth) 

a Virginis (Spica) 

17 Ursae Majoris (Benetnasch) . 

j8 Centauri 

a Trianguli Australis 

d Scorpii 

a Pavonis 

a Gruis 

a Piscis Australis (Fomalhaut) 

y Geminorum. 

(Alhcna) 6»> 3211. 
N. 16° 29'. 
and : — 

e Canis Majoris (.^^fZara) 

5 Canis Majoris 

a Geminorum (Castor) 

fi Geminorum (Pollux) 

y Argus 

e Argils 

5 Argus 

y3 Argiis 

a Leonis (i2f(7«/«,s) 

a Ursae Majoris (Duhhc) 

a Crucis I 

y Crucis 

k Crucis 

6 Ursae Majoris ( A lioth) | 

a Virginis (Spica) 

7) Ursae Majoris (Benetnasch)... 

3 Centauri 

a Cygni (Deneh) 

o Piscis Australis (i?o»i«Wia«<) 

c Canis Majoris. 

(Adara) 6'' 55™. 
S. 28° 51'. 
and : — 



363718 
46 51 i6 
453847 
575237 
63 12 31 

9651 55 
74 28 44 

76 7 32 

77 39 '5 
109 8 46 

loi 3 6 

117 16 13 
86 9 3 
91 2347 

118 9 32 

100 59 50 
974248 
98 29 34 



45 39" 
43 26 18 
20 10 7 
19 28 10 
66 59 o 

785051 
76 3 42 
90 20 42 

5» 7 37 
6433 10 

103 2034 
102 50 17 
105 21 42 

78 42 30 

104 22 33 

88 29 9 
11448 6 
1 12 14 3 
1192934 



5 Canis Majoris 3 21 54 

a Geminorum (Castor) 61 27 43 

/3 Geminorum (Po/Zh,/') 58 515 

7 Argus I 225622 

€ Argus 33 42 26 



h m 

I 34 
I 50 
138 

155 
429 

250 
I 40 
1 30 
'35 
3 8 

I o 

323 

1 42 

2 9 

2 6 

239 

3 5 
3 49 



238 
2 42 
I 40 

1 14 
251 

z 42 
250 

2 41 

9 17 
I 52 

3 10 

3 '7 
3 14 
'45 

7 o 

I 42 
3 " 

257 
o 22 



'423 
13 II 
13 18 
1142 
12 15 



Look for the Star with the smaller R.A. in bold type. 



28 



STARS AND SEXTANTS. 



DISTANCES OF THE STAR PAIRS, Etc. 



Star Pair. 



Distance. 



R.A. and 

Dec. of 

Fictitious 

Star. 



Star Pair. 



Distaucc. 



R.A. and 

Dec. of 

Fictitious 

Star. 



Canis Majoris— contd. 



5 Argus 

/3 Argus 

a Leonis [Regulus) 

o Ursa' ilajoris [Duhhe] . 
a Crucis 



7 Crucis 

k Crucis 

e Ursse Majoris {Alioth) 

a Virginia [Spica) 

ri Ursae llajoris {Benetnasch) . 



$ Centauri 

a Scor}iii [Antures) ... 
a Trianguli Australia 

A Scoqiii 

6 Scorpii 



€ Sagiltarii 

o Pavonis 

a Giuis 

a Piscis Australia {Fomalhual) 



8 Cauis Majoris 

rh 



32 238 

45 M' 

61 25 12 

103 953 

60 51 I 

6223 5 
6357 I 

113 2 56 
90 19 I 

119 13 10 

72 3346 

114 259 

79 914 
no 58 56 
105 38 40 

116 733 
92 20 o 
92 52 38 
8 16 4 



b n 
II 51 



27 N 
12 23 15 N 
15 9 



1342 
II 46 



and: — 



S. 26° 14'. 



a Geiuinorum {Castor) . 
3 Geiuinorum {I'uUhj:) 

y Argus 

e Argus 

S Argus 



$ Argus 

a JjBonis {Meg idua) 

o Ursae Majoris {Duhhe) 

a Crucis 

y Crucis 



II 31 32N 
II 41 30N 



45 S 
S 
N 



1417 
20 30 

1437 

11 47 

^3 32 

12 32 
12 17 
12 20 

12 37 

3 12 
1352 
1449 



32.>, 

58 S 
38S 

27 N 
S 
N 
.7X 
14 N 

8N 
9S 

25 S 
41 S 



5837 II 

55 8 30 
24 910 

353044 
332054 



13 '3 
1318 
12 II 
12 32 



6S 

9.S 

25 X 

16 N 



12 14 24 



4657 37|i2 36 14N 
58 10 2 15 10 46 S 



99 55 4 
61 58 16 

63 753 



1344 
12 3 
1 1 44 



$ ('rucis 

€ Ursffi Majoris {Alioth) 

o Viiginis [S'pku) 

7; Ursffi Majoris {Benetnasch) 
j8 Centauri 



27 N 

33N 



a Scori)ii {Antarcs) 

a Trianguli Australis 

A. Scorpii 

Scorpii 

t Saiiittarii 



64 53 o II 52 30N 
109 41 19 ,14 15 J32 S 

88 45 33 20 39 162 S 
115 5228 |i4 38 J38S 

73 43 " '2 3 27 X 



a Pa von is 

a Giuis 

a Piscis Australia (i^owia/Aaw<, 



1144549 23 37 

81 14 38 12 39 

1 12 42 26 12 24 

I 
107 30 49 12 29 

118 19 44 12 41 

95 16 50 13 19 

96 II 14 113 54 
loi 35 34 1442 



35 S 
iiN 
18 N 
16 X 
10 N 



25 S 
41 s 



a Geminornm. 

{Castur) 7'' 29 



and : — 



N. 32° 6'. 



j8 Geniinorum {Pollux) 4 3047 

7 Argus : 79 37 

Argus 915620 

5 Aigus 87 54 II ^1348 

/3 Argus 103 II 91I345 



h m 

"4 39 

1340 

340 



a Leonis {Rcguhis) 

a Ur&fe ilajoris {Dubhe). 

a Crucis 

7 Crucis 

)3 Crucis 



40 31 42 17 II 
443954 12 15 
III I 35 1431 
108 3053 1445 
II 1 39 19 14 42 



€ Ursie Majoris {Alioth) 58 33 43 11 51 

o Virginia (Spica) 93 53 5^ |'S 12 

7j Ura;e M^ioris {Briietna ch) . . 68 1920 11 39 

aLyvx {Frga) 108 4 10 13 4 

a Cygni {Deneb) loi 21 41354 



(3 Geminorura. 

{Pollux) 7I' 39™. 

N. 28= 15'. 
and : — 

7 Argus 

e Argus 

5 Argus 

i3 Argus 

a Leonis {Regulus) 

c. Ursse Majoris {Duhhe) 

a Crucis 

7 Crucis 

/3 Crucis 

6 Ursa; Majoris {Alioth) 

o Virginis {Spica) 

7} Ursse ilajoria {Benetnascli) 

/3 Centauri 

a Ly rffi ( Vega) 

a Cygni {Deneb) 



Argus. 



and : — 



8h 

S. 47^ 



e Argus 

5 Argus 

j3 Argus 

a Leonis {Regulxts) 

a Ursse Majoris {Dubhe) 



753338 
875225 
83 42 48 

99 2 I 
37 215 

4647 2 

106 31 30 

104 013 

107 832 
60 3 2 

90 50 40 

69 27 34 

116 19 45 

III 18 31 

105 3525 



27 X 
5N 
5N 
9N 
8N 

2X 

6S 

24 X 

28 X 
27 X 

33S 

56N 
36S 

loS 
loN 



12 19 19 

911 54 
23 42 12 

645725 
114 32 26 



1350 


I35I 


1357 


1355 
1728 


1239 


1432 
1446 


1442 


12 15 


18 5 


12 4 


1449 


13 14 


1359 



4Ni 
4Xi 
8X 
7N! 
57 X 

25 s 

23N 

28 X 
27 X 
33 S 

59N 
36 s 

29 N 
13S 

9N 



1346 5N 

12 27 22X 

13 24 loX 

15 39 21 S 

15 7 13S 



Look for the Star with the smaller R.A. in bold type. 



STARS AND SEXTANTS. 



29 



DISTANCES OF THE STAR PAIRS, Etc. 



star Pair. 



y Argus — continued. 



Distance. 



a Crucis 37 55 

y Crucis 39 35 22 

/8 Crucis 41 158 

6 Ursffi Majoris (^/io</() ' 119 658 

o Virginis (Spica) 74 19 35 



fi Centauri 

o ScoTi)n{Antares) 

o Trianguli Aiistralis. 

\ Scorpii 

6 Scorpii 



c Sagittarii 

o Pavonis 

o Gruis 

o Piscis Australis {Fomalhaut) 



€ Argus. 



and : — 



%^ 2in>. 
S. 59° 12' 



5 Argus 

/3 Argils 

a Leouis (Regulus) 

a Crucis 28 23 41 

7 Crucis 31 32 34 



493835 
91 10 23 

57 53 S3 
88 39 22 
833654 

94 55 55 
755233 

82 12 41 
941533 



5 39 55 
II 3053 

743540 



j3 Crucis 32 751 

a Virginia (5)ncff) ' 73 831 

j3 Centauri I 39 41 32 

o Scorpii {Antares) I 81 40 53 

a Trianguli Australis 45 51 7 



\ Scorpii 

Q Scorpii 

« Sagittarii 

a Pavonis 

a Gruis , 

a Piscis Australis [Fomalhaut) 



8 Argus. 



and : — 



8h 42m. 
S. 54° 22', 



77 1649 
72 o 29 

8257 57 
63 45 20 
71 21 30 
851751 



R. A. and 

Dec. of 

Fictitious 

Star. 



h ni 
II 54 
II 20 
II 36 
1556 
1958 

" 55 
2328 

13 10 
o 31 
o 38 

o 57 

14 8 

15 I 

350 



16 20 
1259 
1548 
1047 



22 29 
1944 
It 12 

23 12 
12 52 

o 16 

028 

o 50 

2 17 

3 22 

4 16 



3 Argus 15 21 12 14 10 

a Leonis (/i»'(/mZws) 685847 1558 

a Ursae Majoris {Duhhe) ! 1 19 37 40 15 39 

a Crucis [ 28 49 58 11 43 

7 Crucis 30 54 25 10 53 

/3 Crucis I 32 621 '11 17 

a Virginis {Spica) \ 69 28 13 19 49 

40 31 21 1 1 49 
I2 14 14 23 26 



)3 Centauri 

a Scorpii [Antares)... 

a Trianguli Australis 



27 N 
33N 
30 X 
24 s 

43S 

27 N 
31S 
.3N 

2! S 
I9S 

I5S 

iS 

I2S 

27 N 



17S 
12 X 

13S 

26 X 
28 s 

27 s 
30 S 

23 X 

23S 

I2N 

I7S 

I6S 

I3S 

iN 
loX 
14N 



7N 
loS 
loS 
27 X 
31 X 

29 N 

35 « 

6X" 

29 S 



49 153 132214X 



Star Pair. 



8 Argus — rnntinurd. 

\ Scorpii 

6 Scorpii... 

e Sagittarii 

o Pavonis 

a Gruis 

a Piscis Australis [Fomalhaut) 



ft Argus. 

S. 69° 19'. 
and : — 

a Leonis [Rei/ii/us) , 

o Crucis 

7 Crucis 

(6 Crucis 

o Virginis [Spica) 

Centauri 

a. Scorpii [Antares) 

a Trianguli Australis 

\ Scorpii 

d Scorpii 

€ Sagittarii , 

a Aquilse [Altair) 

a Pavonis 

a Gruis 

a Piscis Australis [Fomalhaut) 



a Leonis. 

[RegnJus) loi^ 3™. 
N. 12° 26'. 
and : — 

a Ursae Majoris [Duhhe) 

a Crucis 

7 Crucis 

/3 Crucis 

€ UrsiB Majoris [Alioth) 

a Virginis [Spied) 

7) Ursaj Majoris [Benetnasch) . 

/8 Centauri 

a Scorpii [A ntares) 

a Trianguli Australis 

A Scorpii 

S Scorpii 

a r.yrse [Feija) 

a Cygni [Dendi) 



Distance. 



79 28 27 
74 28 42 

85 55 57 
68 29 37 
7649 2 
90 57 40 



82 15 9 
19 49 20 
2430 15 
24 o 4 

70 21 58 

295651 

71 33 43 
34 20 27 
6559 14 
6037 5 

71 27 26 
117 42 26 

5315 19 
6253 15 
785227 



5047 12 
79 39 4 
75 5 4 
78 27 16 
5422 7 



R. A. and 

Dec. of 

Fictitious 

Star. 



o 32 21 S 

44 1 9 S 

1 2 16S 
14 30 3 X 

3 27 7 X 
416 16X 



1559 
21 30 

2047 

21 20 
1935 

22 30 
23 



5S 
21S 
21 S 
21S 
I9S 

20 S 
I9S 



058 I2S 

o 10 15 S 
o 26 14S 

o 49 '13 S 
137 8S 
236 4S 
346 3N 
432 7N 



1552 
16 16 
16 20 
16 22 
15 34 



54 3 19 17 50 



58 20 10 

85 5936 

99 55 57 

1044543 

114 644 
114 20 8 
109 17 52 
1 19 28 31 



15 20 
1628 

1747 

16 27 



17 17 
17 8 
15 17 
1548 



8S 
15X 
19X 
19X 
26 S 



63 X 
36 s 

25 X 

63X 
2IX 

53N 
46N 

9 S 
7 s 



Look for the Star with the sinaUcr K.A. in bold type. 



;o 



STARS AND SEXTANTS. 



DISTANCES OF THE STAR PAIRS, Etc. 



star Pair. 



a Ursse Majoris. 

(Dubhc) lo'^sSm. 
N. 62° 16'. 
and : — 

e Ursse Majoris (^/io<'() 

a Virginia (Spica) 

7) Ursae }il^^ons{Benetnascfi).,, 

a Scorpii {Antares) 

a Lyrae {Vega) 

a Aquilre (Altair) 

a Gygni {Dench) 

a Crucis. 

S. 62° 34'. 
and : — 

7 Crucis 

k Crucis 

e Ursse Majoris (^/io/A) 

o Virgin is ((Sjstca) 

7j Ursffi Majoris (Benetnasch).., 

)8 Centauri 

o Scorpii (Antarts) 

a Trianguli Australia 

A. Scorpii 

e Scorpii 

€ Sagittarii 

a AtjuiUe {All air) 

a I'avonis 

a Gruis 

a Piscis Australis {Fomalhaut) 

y Crucis. 

iz^ 26™. 
S. 56' 35'. 
and : — 

/3 Crucis 

t Ursae Majoris {AlioVi) 

o Virginis {Spica) 

ij Ursfe Majoris {Benetnasch).. 
/3 Centauri 

a Scorpii {Antarcs) 

a Trianguli Australis 

A. Scorpii 

Scorpii 

t Sagittarii 

o Aquilre {Altair) 

o Pa vonis 

a Gruis 

a Piscis Australis {Fomalliaut) 



Distance. 



15 1431 

77 59 6 

25 42 29 

109 1 1 54 

66 327 

100 7 9 
69 12 2 



619 

4 1434 

1 19 10 38 

525851 

113 3244 

1145 4 
532815 
255152 

5138 5 
47 15 2 

592958 
107 19 22 
51 3017 
66 34 29 
8536 8 



3 22 20 
113 936 

47 634 
10735 '5 

12 23 10 

51 40 28 

29453s 

52 6 32 
481837 
6048 10 

108 10 20 
55 59 '6 
71 46 21 
91 3 7 



R.A. and 
Dec. of 

Fictitious 
Star. 



22 15 
19 9 
9 



27 N 
15 N 

27 N 



21 30 25 N 
I 46 21 N 



158 

3 27 



1842 
20 32 
1835 
1925 
19 12 

o 8 

23 17 

5" 

54 

1 17 

I 32 
128 

4 5 
452 

5 10 



16 13 

1837 
1927 
19 9 
1425 

2334 
16 6 

I >7 
142 

I 52 



20 N 

N 



3S 
5S 
2S 
8S 
6S 

27 S 

26 s 

I9N 

27 s 
27 s 

26 s 

27 s 
6S 
2S 
9S 



20 N 

2S 

loS 

7S 
30 N 

33 S 
21N 
33S 
32 S 
32S 



I 22 33S 
1623 i8N 



5 2 
5 18 



13S 
12S 



Star Pair. 



Distance. 



R.A. and 

Dec. of 

Fictitious 

Star. 



P Crucis. 

12'' 4211. 
S. 59' 10'. 
and : — 

( Ursse Majoris {Alioth) 115 3918 

a Virginis (.S^JiCffi) 49 151 

7j Ursae ^1a,]ons {Benetnasch) .. . 109 40 44 

k Centauri 9 29 43 

a Scorpii (-4n<arps) 50 9 

a Trianguli Australis 26 23 25 

\ Scorpii 49 33 21 

e Scorpii 45 32 34 

c Sagittarii 57 58 44 

o Aquilae {Altair) 105 33 45 

a Pavonis 52 37 11 

o Gruis 68 29 42 

a Piscis K\\siraA\s {Fomalhaut) 87 50 48 

e Ursse Majoris. 

{Alioth) i2i» 50™. 
N. 56° 29'. 
and : — 

o Virginis (iS^i'ca) 6726 9 

77 Ursae Majoris {Benetnasch)... 10 27 59 

)8 Centauri 117 9 

o Scorpii {Antare.i) 94 11 44 

\ Scorpii 1 10 16 14 

e Scorpii "5 30 33 

e Sagittarii 114 439 

a Lyrae {Vega) 56 31 51 

a Aquilae (.<4;<air) 9027 6 

a Cygni {Deneh) 65 4426 

a Virginis. 

{Spica) 13'' 20m. 

S. 10° 40'. 
and : — 

7? Ursae Majoris {Benetnasch) .. 60 40 27 

$ Centauri [ 49 43 49 



a Scorpii {Antarcs) 
a Trianguli Australis. 
K Scorpii 



B Scorpii 62 46 43 

€ Sagittarii 71 11 42 

a Lyrae {Vega) 87 46 48 



45 54 16 
66 16 25 
61 7 37 



a AquiliB {AUair) 
a Pavonis 



a Cygni {Bench) 
a Gruis 



975424 
884558 

III 1653 
107 II 54 



h ni 
1845 
1924 
19 17 

1334 
23 26 

16 4 
I 10 

I 36 
I 46 

I 27 

423 

5 5 
5 20 



19 15 
22 10 
19 21 
21 32 
21 58 

2144 

2243 

2 28 

2 5 
4 16 



19 22 
19 13 

17 52 

19 9 
1828 

1838 46N 
1820 56N 

20 8;48S 
23 2 
1855 

20 6 
1854 



Look for the Star with the smaller R.A. in bold type. 



STARS AND SEXTANTS. 



31 



DISTANCES OF THE STAR PAIRS, Etc. 



Star Pair. 



Distance. 



R.A. and 

Dec. of 

Fictitious 

Star. 



T) Ursse Majoris. 

{Benetnasch) i3*> 44™. 

N. 49° 47'- 
and : — 



3 Centauri 

a Scorpii {Antares) 

\ Scorpii 

Scorpii 

( Sagittarii 



o Lyrae {Tega) .... 
o Aquilae (J Hair) 
a Cygni {Deneb) ... 

(3 Centauri. 



S. 59° 55'. 
and : — 

a Scorpii (Antares).... 
a Trianguli Australis 

\ Scorpii 

Scorpii 

( Sagittarii 



a Lyrae {Fega) 

a Aquilae [Altair) 

o Pavonis 

a. Gruis 

a Piacis Australis {Fomalhatit) 



a Scorpii. 

{Ayitares) 

i ^' 

I and : — 



,6h j^in 
26° 13' 



a Trianguli Australis. 

\ Scorpii 

d Scorpii 

( Sagittarii 

a Lyrae {Vega) 



a Aquilae [Altair) 

a Pavonis 

a Cygni (Deneb) 

a Gruis 

a Piscis Australis {Fomalhaiit) 

a Trianguli Australis. 

16'' 39'u. 

S. 68" 51'. 
and : — 

\ Scorpii 

6 Scorpii 

I Sagittarii 

a Lyrae (Vega) 

a Aquilae (A Hair) 



10944 7 

99 49 «2 
105 6 2 
10341 39 

51 058 
834826 
64 2425 



41 5922 
19 740 
40 7 10 
36 252 
48 2928 

11341 7 

96 452 

45 29 24 
6z 32 48 
82 1743 



42 41 28 
17 1647 
21 3423 
255318 
71 41 46 

60 14 44 
51 20 14 
91 44 9 

673325 
8251 6 



323043 
26 47 10 

37 7 4 

109 39 6 

84 1 44 



h m 

'9 45 

21 34 

22 o 

2 1 49 
2238 

3 8 

2 12 

452 



23 10 

17 17 

I 6 
I 40 

148 

23 8 
125 
458 
530 
5 36 



22 17 

20 42 

21 12 
1930 

23 8 

057 
21 12 

2339 
20 41 
1952 



2347 

2357 

047 

2 

1 35 



N 
22 N 
27 N 
24 N 
30 N 

38N 
39 N 
30 N 



23S 
21N 

30 S 
31S 
31S 

23 S 

30S 

22 S 
20 S 

19 s 



2N 

40 N 
31N 

54 N 

22S 

52S 
32N 
3SS 
41N 
51 N 



6S 
8S 

12 S 
88 

15S 



Star Pair. 



Distance. 



R.A. and 

Dec. of 

Fictitious 

Star. 



a Trianguli Australis — confJ. 



a Pavonis 

a Gruis 

a Piscis Australis (FtDnallimtt) 



\ Scorpii. 



and : — 



1711 27m. 
S. 37° 2'. 



9 Scor|)ii 

€ Sagittarii 

a Lvrae (Vega) 

a Aquilae (Altai?-) 
a Pavonis , 



a Cygni (Deneb) 

a Gruis 

a. Piscis Australis (Fomalhaut) 

6 Scorpii. 



17° 30™. 
S. 42° 56'. 
and : — 

6 Sagittarii 

a Lyrae (Vega) 

o Aquilae (Altair) ... 

a Pavonis 

a Cygni (Deneb) 



o Gruis , 

a Piscis Australis (Fomalhaut) 

€ Sagittarii. 



and : — 



i8»» i8ra 
S. 34° 26'. 



a Lyrae (Vega) 

a Aquilae (Altair) . 

a Pavonis 

a Cygni (Deneb).... 
a. Gruis 



a Piscis Australis (Fomalhaut) 

a Lyrse. 

(Vega) li^ 34™. 

N. 38-42'. 
and : — 



a Aquilaj (Altair) 

a Pavonis 

o Cygni (Deneb) 

o Gruis 

a Piscis Australis (Fomalhaut) 



26 26 2 

43 30 17 
63 17 59 



5 5614 
10 36 23 
77 16 3 
56 350 
342855 

92 36 48 
50 16 42 
66 o 32 



12 32 29 
82 52 56 
60 5 28 

2946 35 
97 1844 

463322 
63 28 17 



73 13 I 
47 51 10 
30 22 20 
853013 
43 1844 

57 3 55 



34 II 41 
98 14 6 
23 51 20 

97 49 38 
912550 



h m 

4 45 
538 
540 



2lS 
21S 

21S 



23 12 

4 8 
2354 
25 
21 34 

o 50 

20 40 
7 32 



2 II 

2358 
I 25 

21 10 
054 

20 16 

7 14 



25 

1 30 
23 o 

1 13 

21 42 



I 7 
2057 



Look for the Star with the smaller R.A. in bold type. 



32 



STARS AND SEXTANTS. 



DISTANCES OF THE STAR PAIRS, Etc. 



Star Pair. 



Distance. 



a Aquilae. 

{Altair) 19^ 46™. 
N. 8" 37'. 
and : — 



a Pavonis 6559 7 



a Cygni (Dcveh), 

a Gruis 

a Fiscis AnstvaMs {Fomalhauf). 

a Pavonis. 

20^1 i8"i. 
S. 57" 2'. 
and : — 

a Cygni (Deneb) 

a Grills 

a PisL-is Australis (Fomcdhaut) 



38 I 39 
63 38 2 

59 9 7 



102 4 o 
1826 55 

37 54 12 



R.A. and 
Dec. of 

Fictitious 
Star. 



I 47 
138 



2 29 
6 19 
6 7 



Star Pair. 



Distance. 



R. A. and 
Dec. of 

Fictitious 
Star. 



4N 

5S 
25 N 
46 N 



2S 
31 S 

28 S 



a Cygni. 

{Dench) 2c'> 38m. 
K. 44° 56'. 
and : — 



a Gruis 941124 



3 J7 



a Piscis Australis (/'o/H«//((r«/) Si 2 36 ' 4 2 
a Gruis. 

22'' 2"1. 

S. 47° 25'. 



and : — 

a Piscis Australis {Fomcdhaut; 

{Fomrdhant) 22I1 52™. 
S. 30° 7'. 



•94833 



5 47 



20 N 



22 S 



Look for the Star with the smaller R. A. in bold type. 



STARS AND SEXTANTS. 



33 



EX-1\1ERIDIAN STAR PAIKS, 

WITH DISTANCES FOR EVERY TEN DAYS. 
(See Introduction, p. xiv.) 



Capella (a Auriijce) and Rigel (^S Ononis 



R.A. 5'' 10™ 
Dec. 45° 54.' N. 

I\fil". 0-2 



R.A. 5'' 10™ 
Dec. 8° 19' S. 
Mag. 0-3 



Date. 



Jan. 

Feb. 
Mar. 

Apr. 

May 

June 

July 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Dec. 



I 
1 1 

21 

31 
10 
20 
I 
1 1 
21 

31 

10 

20 

30 
10 
20 
30 
9 

19 
29 

9 
19 
29 

8 
18 
28 

7 
17 
27 

7 
17 
27 

6 
1 6 
26 

6 
16 
26 
36 



Distance. 



54- J 


2 


54 


5+ ' 


2 


57 


5+ 1 


3 





5 + 


3 


2 


54 1 


3 


4 


54 ' 


3 


5 


54 ' 


3 


5 


54 J 


3 


5 


54 


3 


5 


54 ' 


3 


4 


54 


3 


3 


54 


3 


I 


54 


2 


59 


54 


2 


5(^ 


54 


2 


53 


54 


2 


50 


54 


2 


47 


54 


2 


44 


54 


2 


41 


54 


12 


3« 


54 


2 


35 


54 


2 


33 


54 


2 


31 


54 


[2 


30 


54 


2 


29 


54 


2 


28 


54 


2 


28 


54 


2 


29 


54 


2 


30 


54 


2 


32 


54 


12 


34 


54 


12 


36 


54 


2 


39 


54 


[2 


42 


54 


2 


46 


54 


[2 


49 


54 


12 


52 


54 


12 


55 



II. 

Mizar (( Ur-^m Majorix) and 
Spica (tt Vh-'jinix). 

R.A. i3i' 20"' . R.A. 13'' 20™ 
Dec. 55° 25' N. . Dec. 10° 40' S. 
Mag. 2-1 . ]\Iag. 1*2 



Date. 



Jan. 


I 




1 1 




2 I 


Feb. 


31 
10 




20 


Mar. 


I 




1 1 




2 1 


Apr. 


31 

10 




20 


May 


30 

10 


• 


20 


Juno 


30 
9 




19 


July 


29 
9 




'9 


Aug. 


29 
8 




18 




28 


Sept. 


7 




17 


Oct. 


27 

7 




17 


Nov. 


27 
6 




16 




26 


Dec. 


6 




16 




26 




36 



Distance. 



66 


4 


53 


66 


4 


54 


66 


4 


55 


66 


4 


56 


66 


4 


58 


66 




I 


66 




4 


66 




7 


66 




10 


66 




13 


66 




17 


66 




20 


66 




23 


66 




26 


66 




28 


66 




30 


66 




31 


66 




32 


66 




32 


66 




32 


66 




31 


66 




30 


66 




29 


66 




27 


66 




24 


66 




21 


66 




18 


66 




15 


66 




1 1 


66 




8 


66 




4 


66 




I 


66 


4 


59 


66 


4 


57 


66 


4 


55 


66 


4 


54 


66 


4 


53 


66 


4 


53 



34 



STAES ANT) SEXTANTS. 







EX-MERIDIAN 


STAR PAIRS, 






WITH DISTANCES FOR EVERY TEN DAYS. 






(See Introiludion, p. xiv.) 






III. 


IV. 


6 Scorpii and a Opliiuclii. 


a Pavonis and y Cygni. 


E.A. 


i7^'3 


0'" . E.A. 17I' 30'n 


R.A. 20»' 1 8-^ . E.A. 20'' 19"' 


Dec. 


42° 56' S. . Dec. 12° 38' K. 


Dec. 57° 2'S. . Dec. 39°57'N. 


Mug. 


2-0 


Mag. 2-1 


Mag. 2-0 . Mag. 2-3 


Date. 


Distance. 


Date. 


Distance. 


.Tun. 


I 


5 5° 33' 5+" 


Jan. I 


96 59' 45" 




1 1 


55 33 51 


I I 


96 59 41 




21 


55 33 48 


21 


96 59 35 




31 


55 33 46 


31 


96 59 29 


Feb. 


10 


55 33 43 


Feb. 10 


96 59 24 




20 


55 33 42 


20 


96 59 19 


Mar. 


I 


55 33 41 


Mar. I 


96 59 14 




1 1 


55 33 41 


1 1 


96 59 10 




21 


55 33 41 


21 


96 59 7 




31 


55 33 42 


31 


96 59 5 


Apr. 


10 


55 33 43 


Apr. 10 


96 59 3 




20 


55 33 45 


20 


96 59 2 




30 


55 33 47 


30 


96 59 2 


May 


10 


55 33 49 


May 1 


96 59 3 




20 


55 33 52 


20 


96 59 5 




30 


55 33 55 


30 


96 59 7 


June 


9 


55 33 58 


June 9 


96 59 10 




19 


55 34 I 


'9 


96 59 14 




29 


55 34 4 


29 


96 59 18 


July 


9 


55 34 7 


July 9 


96 59 23 




J9 


55 34 10 


19 


96 59 28 




29 


55 34 12 


29 


96 59 33 


Aug. 


8 


55 34 14 


Aug. 8 


96 59 38 




18 


55 34 '6 


18 


96 59 43 




28 


55 34 17 


28 


96 59 47 


Sept. 


7 


55 34 18 


Sept. 7 


96 59 51 




'7 


55 34 18 


17 


96 59 5 5 




27 


55 34 18 


27 


96 59 58 


Oct. 


7 


55 34 17 


(_)ct. 7 


97 




17 


55 34 16 


17 


97 I 




27 


55 34 14 


27 


97 2 


Nov. 


6 


55 34 II 


Nov. 6 


97 2 




16 


55 34 9 


16 


97 1 




26 


55 34 6 


26 


96 59 59 


Dec. 


6 


55 34 2 


Dec. 6 


96 59 56 




16 


55 33 59 


16 


96 59 52 




26 


55 33 55 


26 


96 59 47 




36 


55 33 52 


36 


96 59 43 



STAES AND SEXTANTS. 



35 







EX-MERIDIAN STAR PAIRS, 






WITH DISTANCES FOR EVERY TEN DAYS. 






(See Introduction, p. xiv.) 








V. 




VI. 


Polaris (a Ursce Mljinris) and 


Polaris (a Ur>^(e Jfinoris) and ' 




Alpheratz (u Amlromedce). 


Schedir (a Camopeice). 


R.A. 


i" 


2+™ . R.A. oh 3'" 


R.A. 1'' 


24'" . R.A. 0'' 35m 


Dec. 


88° 48' X. . Dec. 28° 34' N. 


Dec. 88^ 


^8' N. . Dec. 56° i' N. 


Mag 


. 2-1 


. Mag. 2-1 


]\rag. 2-1 


. Mag. 2 "2 — 2*8 

1 


Date. 


Distance. 


Date. 


Distance. 


Jan. 


I 


60° I S' 46" 


Jan. I 


32° 48 49" 




I I 


60 18 46 


1 1 


32 48 50 




21 


60 18 46 


21 


32 48 50 




31 


60 18 46 


31 


32 48 51 


Feb. 


10 


60 18 47 


Feb. 1 


32 48 51 




20 


60 J 8 46 


20 


32 48 51 


Mar. 


I 


60 18 45 


Mar. I 


32 48 51 




I I 


60 18 43 


1 1 


32 48 50 




21 


60 18 41 


21 


32 48 50 




31 


60 18 39 


31 


32 48 49 


Apr. 


10 


60 18 37 


Apr. 10 


32 48 49 




20 


60 18 35 


20 


32 48 48 




30 


60 18 33 


30 


32 48 47 


May 


10 


60 18 31 


May 10 


32 48 46 




20 


60 18 29 


20 


32 48 45 




30 


60 18 27 


30 


32 48 44- 


June 


9 


60 18 25 


June 9 


32 48 43 




19 


60 18 24 


19 


32 48 42 




29 


60 18 23 


29 


32 48 41 


July 


9 


60 18 22 


July 9 


32 48 40 




19 


60 18 21 


19 


32 48 40 




29 


60 18 21 


29 


32 48 40 


Aug. 


8 


60 18 21 


Aug. 8 


32 48 39 




18 


60 18 22 


18 


32 48 39 


1 


28 


60 18 23 


28 


32 48 39 


Sept. 


7 


60 18 24 


Sept. 7 


32 48 40 




17 


60 18 26 


17 


32 48 40 




27 


60 18 28 


27 


32 48 41 


Oct. 


7 


60 18 30 


Oct. 7 


32 48 41 




17 


60 18 33 


17 


32 48 42 


1 


27 


60 18 35 


27 


32 48 43 


Nov. 


6 


60 18 37 


Nov. 6 


32 48 44 




16 


60 18 39 


16 


32 48 45 




26 


60 18 41 


26 


32 48 46 


Dec. 


6 


60 18 43 


Dec. 6 


32 48 47 




16 


60 18 45 


16 


32 48 48 




26 


60 18 46 


26 


32 48 49 




36 


60 18 46 


36 


32 48 50 1 



,6 



STAES AND SEXTANTS. 







EX-MERIDIAN STAR PAIRS, 






WITH DISTANCES FOR EVERY TEN DAYS. 






(See Introduction, p. xiv.) 








VII. 




VIII. 


Polai 


is (a 


Ur^cB Minorix) and (3 Ceti. 


Polaris (a Ursre Minoris) and y Cassiopeige. 


E.A. 


,h2 


4'" . R.A. 0'' 39"! 


R.A. ii> 2 


4'" . R.A. 0'' 51™ 


Dec. 


88° 4 


8' N. . Dec. 18° 31' S. 


Dec. 88^48' N. . Dec. 60° 12' N. 1| 


^lag. 


21 


. Mag. 2-2 


Mag. 2*1 


. ]\[ag. 2'3 


DaU\ 


Distance. 


Date. 


Distance. 


Jan. 


I 


107 20 22 


Jan. I 


28° 36' 43" 




I 1 


107 20 22 


1 1 


28 36 43 




21 


107 20 22 


21 


28 36 44 




3' 


107 20 21 


31 


28 36 44 


Feb. 


lO 


107 20 20 


Feb. 1 


28 36 45 




20 


107 20 17 


20 


28 36 45 


^rar. 


I 


107 20 14 


Mar. I 


28 36 45 




II 


107 20 10 


1 1 


28 36 45 




21 


107 20 6 


21 


28 36 44 




31 


107 20 I 


31 


28 36 44 


Apr. 


lO 


107 19 56 


A pr. 1 


28 36 44 




20 


107 19 51 


20 


28 36 43 




30 


107 19 46 


30 


28 36 42 


May 


10 


107 19 41 


]\ray 1 


28 36 41 




20 


107 19 37 


20 


28 36 40 




30 


107 19 33 


30 


28 36 39 


June 


9 


107 19 30 


June 9 


28 36 38 




19 


107 19 28 


19 


28 36 38 




29 


107 19 26 


29 


28 36 37 


July 


9 


107 19 25 


July 9 


28 36 36 




19 


107 19 25 


19 


28 36 36 




29 


107 19 26 


29 


28 36 36 


Aug. 


8 


107 19 27 


Aug. 8 


28 36 35 




18 


107 19 29 


18 


28 36 35 




28 


107 19 32 


28 


28 36 35 


Scjit. 


7 


107 19 36 


Sept. 7 


28 36 35 




17 


107 19 40 


17 


28 36 36 




27 


107 19 44 


27 


28 36 36 


Oct. 


7 


107 19 49 


Oct. 7 


28 36 36 




17 


107 19 54 


17 


28 36 37 




27 


107 19 59 


27 


28 36 38 


Nov. 


6 


107 20 4 


Nov. 6 


28 36 39 




16 


107 20 9 


16 


28 36 40 




26 


107 20 13 


26 


28 36 41 


Dec. 


6 


107 20 17 


Dec. 6 


28 36 42 




16 


107 20 20 


16 


28 36 42 




26 


107 20 22 


26 


28 36 43 




36 


107 20 22 


36 


28 36 43 



STARS AND SEXTANTS. 



37 







EX-]\IERIDIAN STAR PAIRS, 






WITH DISTANCES FOR EVERY TEN DAYS. 






(See Introduction, p. xiv.) 








IX. 




X. 


Polaris 


5 (a Ur$iv. Minorii) and 


Polaris (a Ursoe MiuorU) and 




Alamak (y Androviedm). 


Hamel (a Ariel is). 


R.A. 


jh 2 


4'" . R.A. 1'' cS-" 


R.A. ii' 2 


4"> . R.A. 2'' 2'" 


Dec. 


88° 48' :N. . Dec. 41° 52' N. 


Dec. 88" 48' N. . Dec. 23" 1' N. i| 


Mag. 


2-1 


. Mag. 2*2 


Mag. 2-1 


. Mag. 2*2 


Date. 


Distance. 


Date. 


Distance. 


Jan. 


I 


46° 56 27' 


Jan. 1 


65 48 21 




I I 


46 56 29 


11 


65 48 23 




21 


46 56 30 


21 


65 48 25 




31 


46 56 30 


31 


65 48 26 


Feb. 


10 


46 56 31 


Feb. 1 


65 48 26 




20 


46 56 31 


20 


65 48 26 


^lar. 


I 


46 56 31 


Mar. I 


65 48 25 




I I 


46 56 30 


1 1 


65 48 24 




21 


46 56 29 


21 


65 48 22 




31 


46 56 28 


31 


65 48 20 


Apr. 


10 


46 56 26 


Apr. 10 


65 48 18 




20 


46 56 25 


20 


65 48 15 




30 


46 56 23 


30 


65 48 12 


]\Iay 


10 


46 56 21 


May 10 


65 48 9 




20 


46 56 19 


20 


65 48 6 




30 


46 56 17 


30 


65 48 3 


June 


9 


46 56 16 


June 9 


65 48 




'9 


46 56 14 


19 


65 47 58 




29 


46 56 13 


29 


65 47 56 


July 


9 


46 56 11 


July 9 


65 47 54 




19 


46 56 10 


19 


65 47 53 




29 


46 56 9 


29 


65 47 52 


Aug. 


8 


46 56 9 


Aug. 8 


65 47 52 




18 


46 56 9 


18 


65 47 52 




28 


46 56 9 


28 


65 47 52 


Sept. 


7 


46 56 10 


Sept. 7 


65 47 53 




17 


46 56 11 


17 


65 47 55 




27 


46 56 12 


27 


65 47 57 


Oct. 


7 


46 56 13 


Oct. 7 


65 47 59 




17 


46 56 14 


17 


65 48 I 




27 


46 56 16 


27 


65 48 4 


Nov. 


6 


46 56 18 


Nov. 6 


65 48 7 




16 


46 56 20 


16 


65 48 10 




26 


46 56 22 


26 


65 4^^ 13 


Dec. 


6 


46 56 23 


Dec. 6 


65 48 16 




16 


46 56 25 


16 


65 48 19 




26 


46 56 26 


26 


65 48 21 




36 


46 56 27 


36 


65 48 22 



38 



STARS AND SEXTANTS. 







EX-MERIDIAN STAR PAIRS, 

WITH DISTANCES FOE EVERY TEN DAYS. 
(See Introductio7i, p. xiv.) 








XL 


XII. 




Polaris (a Ursce Minoris) and 


Polaris (a Urs'B Minoru 


) and 


' 


Alioth (e Ur>it<i Majoris). 


Spica (a Virginis). 




K.A. 


,h, 


.4'" . R.A. i2i> CO"' 


R.A. ii'24" . R.A. 


3^ 2 0™ 


Dec. 


88''48'X. . Dec. 56° 29' N. 


Dec. 88° 48'X. . Dec. 


0' 40' S. 


Mag. 


2"I 


. Mag. 1-8 

■ 


Mag. 21 . Mag. 




1-2 


Date. 


Distance. 


Date. 


Distan 


:e. 


Jan. 


I 


34° 42' 38" 


Jan. I 


101 51 


29' 




I I 


34 42 39 


1 1 


101 5 1 


31 




21 


34 42 40 


21 


loi 5 1 


34 




31 


34 42 41 


31 


loi 51 


37 


Feb. 


10 


34 42 42 


Feb. 1 


loi 51 


41 




20 


34 42 43 


20 


loi 51 


45 


Mar. 


I 


34 42 43 


INIar. I 


loi 51 


49 




I I 


34 42 44 


1 1 


loi 51 


53 




21 


34 42 44 


21 


loi 51 


57 




31 


34 42 44 


31 


loi 52 


I 


Apr. 


10 


34 42 45 


Apr. 10 


loi 52 


4 




20 


34 42 45 


20 


loi 52 


7 




30 


34 42 45 


30 


loi 52 


10 


iMay 


10 


34 42 45 


May 1 


loi 52 


12 


•; 


20 


34 42 44 


20 


loi 52 


14 




30 


34 42 44 


30 


loi 52 


16 


June 


9 


34 42 44 


June 9 


101 52 


17 




19 


34 42 43 


19 


loi 52 


17 




29 


34 42 43 


29 


loi 52 


17 


July 


9 


34 42 42 


July 9 


loi 52 


16 


1 


19 


34 42 41 


19 


loi 52 


15 




29 


34 42 41 


29 


loi 52 


13 


Aug. 


8 


34 42 40 


Aug. 8 


loi 52 


10 




18 


34 42 39 


18 


loi 52 


7 




28 


34 42 38 


28 


loi 52 


4 


Sept. 


7 


34 42 37 


Sept. 7 


loi 52 


I 




17 


34 42 36 


17 


loi 51 


57 




27 


34 42 36 


27 


loi 51 


53 


Oct. 


7 


34 42 35 


Oct. 7 


loi 51 


49 




17 


34 42 35 


17 


loi 51 


45 




27 


34 42 3 5 


27 


101 51 


42 


2sov. 


6 


34 42 35 


Nov. 6 


loi 51 


39 




16 


34 42 35 


16 


loi 51 


36 




26 


34 42 35 


26 


loi 51 


34 


Dec. 


6 


34 42 36 


Dec. 6 


101 51 


33 




16 


34 42 36 


16 


101 51 


32 




26 


34 42 37 


26 


loi 51 


32 




36 


34 42 38 


36 


loi 51 


32 



STAES AND SEXTANTS. 



39 



1 


EX-MERIDIAN STAR PAIRS, 




WITH DISTANCES FOR EVERY TEN DAYS. 




(See Introduction, p. xiv.) 




XIII. 


XIV. 


Polaris (a Ursce Minori-i) and 


Polaris (a Ursce MinorU) and 6 Centauri. 


Benetnasch {-q Ursoe Majoris). 




R.A. i'' 2 


^.™ . R.A. 13^ 44™ 


R.A. i'> 24™ . R.A. 14'' I'" 


Dec. 88° 4 


8' N. . Dec. 49° 47' N. 


Dec. 88° 48' N. . Dec. 35° 54' S. 


Mag. 2-1 


. Mag. 1-9 


Mag. 2*1 . Mag. 2-1 


Date. 


Distance. 


Date. 


Distance. 


Jan. I 


41° 24 28" 


Jan. I 


127° 4 45" 


II 


41 24 28 


1 1 


127 4 45 


21 


41 24 29 


21 


127 4 46 


31 


41 24 30 


31 


127 4 48 


Feb. lo 


41 24 31 


Feb. 1 


127 4 50 


20 


41 24 32 


20 


127 4 54 


Mar. I 


+1 24 33 


Mar. I 


127 4 58 


II 


41 24 35 


1 1 


127 5 3 


21 


41 24 36 


21 


127 5 8 


31 


41 24 36 


31 


127 5 13 


Apr. 1 


41 24 36 


Apr. 1 


127 5 17 


20 


41 24 37 


20 


127 5 22 


30 


41 24 37 


30 


127 5 26 


May 10 


41 24 37 


j\Iay 1 


127 5 30 


20 


41 24 37 


20 


127 5 34 


30 


41 24 36 


30 


127 5 37 


June 9 


41 24 36 


June 9 


127 5 40 


19 


41 24 36 


19 


127 5 42 


29 


4' 24 35 


29 


127 5 43 


July 9 


41 24 34 


July 9 


127 5 43 


'9 


41 24 33 


19 


127 5 43 


29 


41 24 33 


29 


127 5 42 


Aug. 8 


41 24 32 


Aug. 8 


127 5 40 


18 


41 24 31 


18 


127 5 37 


28 


41 24 30 


28 


127 5 34 


Sept. 7 


41 24 29 


Sept. 7 


127 5 30 


17 


41 24 28 


17 


127 5 26 


27 


41 24 27 


27 


127 5 21 


Oct. 7 


41 24 27 


Oct. 7 


127 5 16 


17 


41 24 26 


17 


127 5 II 


27 


41 24 26 


27 


127 5 6 


Kov. 6 


41 24 25 


Nov. 6 


127 5 I 


16 


41 24 25 


16 


127 4 57 


26 


41 24 25 


26 


127 4 53 


Dec. 6 


41 24 26 


Dec. 6 


127 4 50 


16 


41 24 26 


16 


127 4 48 


26 


41 24 27 


26 


127 4 46 


36 


41 24 27 


36 


127 4 45 



40 



STARS AND SEXTANTS. 



EX-MERIDIAN STAR PAIRS, 

WITH DISTANCES FOR EVERY TEN DAYS. 
(See Introduction, p. xiv.) 



XV. 



Achevnar (a Eri<lani) and p Centauri. 



R.A. i'' 34'" 
Dec. 57° 43' S. 
Mae. 0-; 



R.A. 13^ 57'" 
Dec. 59' 55' S. 
Mas. 0-8 



Date. 



Jan. 


I 




1 1 




21 




31 


Feb. 


10 




20 


:\rar. 


I 




1 1 




21 




31 


A pr. 


10 




20 




30 


May 


10 




20 




30 


June 


9 




19 




29 


July 


9 




19 




29 


Aug. 


8 




18 




28 


' Sept. 


7 




17 




27 


Oct. 


7 




17 




27 


Nov. 


6 




16 




26 


Dec. 


6 




16 




26 




36 



Distance. 



62 ] 


6 


44 


62 1 


6 


42 


62 1 


6 


40 


62 1 


6 


39 


62 ) 


6 


3H 


62 1 


6 


37 


62 ] 


6 


36 


62 ] 


6 


36 


62 1 


6 


36 


62 1 


6 


37 


62 ] 


6 


37 


62 ] 


6 


38 


62 1 


6 


S8 


62 ] 


6 


39 


62 1 


6 


40 


62 ] 


6 


41 


62 


6 


43 


62 


6 


4"; 


62 


6 


46 


62 


6 


47 


62 


6 


48 


62 


6 


49 


62 


6 


^0 


62 


[6 


'li 


62 


16 


^2 


62 


16 


';3 


62 


16 


53 


62 


16 


ti3 


62 


r6 


'13 


62 


16 


52 


62 


[6 


52 


62 


16 


=i2 


62 


16 


51 


62 


16 


50 


62 


16 


49 


62 


16 


47 


62 


16 


^^ 


62 


16 


43 



XVI. 



Mirfak (a Pevf^d) and Alphecca (a Coron<v), 



R.A. 3'' 17'" 
Dec. 49° 31' N. 
]\Iag. I '9 



R.A. 15'' 31"' 
Dec. 27° 2' X. 
Mag. 2-3 



Date. 



Jan. 


I 




II 




21 




31 


Feb. 


10 




20 


Mar. 


I 




1 1 




21 




31 


Apr. 


10 




20 




30 


May 


10 




20 




30 


June 


9 




19 




29 


July 


9 




19 




29 


Aug. 


8 




18 




28 


Sept. 


7 




17 




27 


Oct. 


7 




17 




27 


Nov. 


6 




16 




26 


Dec. 


6 




16 




26 




36 



Distance. 



103 


23 


10 


103 


23 


12 


103 


23 


13 


103 


23 


'4 


103 


23 


15 


103 


23 


16 


103 


23 


17 


103 


23 


18 


103 


23 


19 


103 


23 


19 


103 


23 


•9 


103 


23 


'9 


103 


23 


'9 


103 


23 


18 


103 


23 


18 


103 


23 


17 


103 


23 


16 


103 


23 


15 


103 


23 


13 


103 


23 


12 


103 


23 


1 1 


103 


23 


10 


103 


23 


9 


103 


23 


7 


103 


23 


6 


103 


23 


5 


103 


23 


4 


103 


23 


4 


103 


23 


3 


103 


23 


3 


103 


23 


4 


103 


23 


4 


103 


23 


5 


103 


23 


6 


103 


23 


7 


103 


23 


8 


103 


23 


9 


103 


23 


10 



STARS AND SEXTANTS. 



41 







EX-MERIDIAN 


STAR PAIRS, 






WITH. DISTANCES FOR EVERY TEN DAYS. | 






(Sec Introdu 


'lion, p. xiv.) 






XVII. 


XVIII. 




Aldebaran (a Tmiri) and 


Alhena (y Geminormn) and Vega (a Li/rce). 




al 


rianguli Australis. 




K.A. 


4*^ 3^ 


D™ . R.A. 16'' 39'" 


R.A. 6i> 32'" . R.A. 18'' 34'" 


Dec. 


16° IC 


)' N. . Dec. 68' 51' S. 


Dec. 16° 29' N. . Dec. 38° 42' N. 


Mag. 


i-l 


. Mag. 1-9 


^Tag. 1-9 . Mag. 0"l 


Date 




Distance. 


Date. 


Distance. 


Jan. 


I 


127° 27' 9" 


Jan. 1 


124° 49' 27" 




1 1 


127 27 10 


1 1 


124 49 31 




21 


127 27 11 


21 


124 49 34 




31 


127 27 11 


31 


124 49 37 


Feb. 


10 


127 27 II 


Feb. 1 


124 49 39 




20 


127 27 10 


20 


124 49 41 


Mar. 


I 


127 27 9 


Mar. I 


124 49 43 




1 1 


127 27 8 


1 1 


124 49 44 




21 


127 27 7 


21 


124 49 44 




31 


127 27 5 


3' 


124 49 44 


Apr. 


10 


127 27 3 


Apr. 10 


124 49 43 




20 


127 27 I 


20 


124 49 42 




30 


127 26 58 


30 


124 49 40 


May 


10 


127 26 55 


JNIay 1 


124 49 38 




20 


127 26 53 


20 


124 49 35 




30 


127 26 51 


30 


124 49 32 


June 


9 


127 26 49 


June 9 


124 49 28 




19 


127 26 47 


^9 


124 49 24 




29 


127 26 46 


29 


124 49 21 


July 


9 


127 26 45 


July 9 


124 49 18 




'9 


127 26 44 


19 


124 49 15 




29 


127 26 44 


29 


124 49 12 


Aug. 


8 


127 26 43 


Aug. 8 


124 49 9 




18 


127 26 43 


18 


124 49 7 




28 


127 26 44 


28 


124 49 5 


Sept. 


7 


127 26 45 


Sept. 7 


124 49 4 




17 


127 26 46 


17 


124 49 3 




27 


127 26 47 


27 


124 49 3 


Oct. 


7 


127 26 49 


Oct. 7 


124 49 4 




17 


127 26 51 


17 


124 49 5 




27 


127 26 54 


27 


124 49 7 


Nov. 


6 


127 26 57 


Nov. 6 


124 49 9 




16 


127 26 59 


16 


124 49 11 




26 


127 27 2 


26 


124 49 14 


Dec. 


6 


127 27 4 


Dec. 6 


124 49 17 




16 


127 27 6 


16 


124 49 20 




26 


127 27 8 


26 


124 49 24 




36 


127 27 9 


36 


124 49 27 



42 



STARS AND SEXTANTS. copyright. 



SEMIDIURNAL ARCS. 



SAME NAME. 



DECLINATION OR LATITUDE. 



SAME NAME. 



^ 








o 











fe 


67 


66 


65 


rt 










h m 


h m 


h m 


O 


6 


6 


6 


I 


6 10 


6 9 


6 9 


2 


6iq 


618 


618 


3 


6 29 


6 27 


626 


4 


638 


636 


635 


S 


648 


64s 


643 


6 


65S 


655 


652 


7 


7 7 


7 4 


7 I 


8 


717 


714 


710 


9 


728 


723 


719 


lO 


738 


7 3^ 


729 


II 


7 49 


7 44 


7 39 


12 


8 


7.S4 


74S 


13 


812 


8 S 


7S9 


«4 


824 


816 


8 9 


IS 


8^7 


828 


820 


i6 


850 


840 


832 


I? 


9 4 


a 53 


844 


i8 


920 


9 7 


857 


19 


937 


923 


9 10 


20 


956 


930 


92s 


21 


10 19 


958 


942 


22 


10 49 


10 21 


10 


*3 


12 


10 50 


1022 


^ 


^^ 


12 


10 51 




> 


^ 




V. 


67 


0^ 




^^66 


^^ 






"^ 


^ 



64 



63 



58 



56 















55 


54 


53 


Sa 


h m 


Ii m 


h m 


h m 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 6 


6 6 


6 ^ 


6 s 


611 


611 


611 


6 10 


617 


617 


616 


61S 


6 23 


6 22 


621 


621 


6 29 


628 


627 


626 


63s 


633 


6 32 


631 


640 


630 


638 


636 


646 


645 


t>43 


641 


652 


650 


&49 


647 


6s8 


656 


654 


652 


7 4 


7 2 


7 


658 


711 


7 « 


7 t) 


7 3 


717 


7 14 


711 


7 9 


723 720 


717 


714 


730 727 


723 


7 20 


7 37 7 33 


729 


7 2t. 


7 44 7 40 


7 3t> 


732 


751 746 


742 


738 


7 58 7 53 


7 49 


7 45 


8 5' 8 


756 


7 51 


813 8 8 


8 3 


7S« 


821 


81S 


810 


8 5 


829 


823 


817 


812 


838 


831 


825 


819 


847 


840 


833 


827 


8S7 


849 


841 


835 


9 7 


8s8 


850 


843 


918 


9 8 


9 


852 


929 


919 


9 10 


9 I 


942 


930 


9 20 


911 


95(3 


9 43 


931 


921 


13 


9 57 


944 


932 


32 


10 13 


958 


9 45 


058 


1033 


10 15 


9 59 


2 


1058 


1033 


10 15 




12 


1058 


1034 


0^ 




12 


1059 


55 


. 54 




12 


">Vs 


>53 


0^ 






"^ 


SJ! 



5» 



49 



48 









46 


45 


h m 


h m 


6 


6 


6 4 


6 4 


6 8 


6 8 


612 


6 12 


617 


616 


6 21 


6 20 


6 25 


624 


6 29 


628 


633 


632 



h m 
6 o 
6 8 
6 17 
625 
633 



h m 
6 o 
6 8 
6:6 
6 24 
6 



6 41 6 40 

6 50' 6 48 
658 656 

7 7! 7 

7 16 7 12 

7 25! 7 21 

7 3t' 730 

743! 7 39 

7 53 748 

8 3 757 

813' 8 7 

824! S 17 

835 827 

847 838 

9 o 850 



h m 

6 

6 

616 

623 

631 

638 
646 
653 
7 
7 9 

717 
7 26 
7 34 
74; 
75: 



8 II 
821 
831 
842 



Ii m 
6 o 
6 7 
615 
6 22 

6 29 

636 
644 
651 
659 

7 6 

714 
7 22 

730 

7 3-^ 

7 4' 

756 

8 5 
8 14 
824 
834 



h m h mi h m 
60606 



6 7 
6 14 
6 21 



6766 
6 13 6 13 
6 20 619 



628 627 626 



635 

6 42 
649 
656 

7 4 

711 
719 
7 26 
73» 
742 



633 632 

6 40 6 39 
647 645 
6541 652 

7 1 659 

7 8} 7 6 
7 '6 7 12 
7 23 7 20 
730 727 
738 7 34 



7 5i[ 7 46| 742 

7 59 754I 7 49 
" ~ " 7 57 

8 17] 8 II 8 5 
8 261 8 20 8 14 



h m 
6 

6 6 
6 12 
6 19 
625 

6 31 

637 
6 

6 50 
656 

7 3 
7 10 
7 16 
72 
730 

7 37 
7 45 
752 



h 
6 

6 6 
6 12 
61 
6 24 

630 
636 

6 42 
648 
654 

7 

7 7 
713 
7 20 
727 

7 34 
741 
748 

7 55 

8 3 




h m 
6 

6 5 
6 9 
6 14 
618 

623 
628 
632 
637 



h m h m 
6060 
6 5; 6 s 
6 10 6 10 
615 6 14 
6 20' 6 19 

625 624 
6 30 6 29 
635 634 

6 40J 6 39 
645 644! 642 

6 50 6 49' 6 47 
656 654' 6 52 

7 I, 659' 657 
76747 
7127977 

7 17 714' 712 

723 720! 717 

7 29 7 25' 7 22 

7 35 7 3i| 72" 

741 7 37, 7 33 

7 47 7 43 7 39 

7 53 7 49 7 45 

8 o 755 751 
8 6 8 2 757 
813 8 8 8 3 

I I 

810 



846 



21 


81S 


28 


822 


36 


830 


44 


837 


53 


845 


2 


854 


12 


9 3 


22 


9'3 


33 


923 


4t> 


9 34 


59 


946 


16 


10 


34 


10 16 


59 


■034 





1059 


>. 


12 


I 


"^ 


^ 


so 



h m 

6 

6 

6 

6 13 

618 

6 22 

6 27 
6 31 
636 

6 41 

645 
650 
655 
659 
7 

7 9 
714 
719 
725 

730 

7 33 
74 
7 47 
7 5 

7 59 

8 S 



825 



856 



h 
6 
6 

6 9 
613 
6 17 

6 22 

626 
630 
635 
639 

644 
648 
653 

657 



7 
7 12 

717 
7 2r 

727 

732 
7 37 
7 43 
7 4t 



936 



12 on o 



84 



847 



638 



8s 



827 
7 34 
646 



48 



87 



3 

4 

5 
6 
7 
8 

6381 636! 9 

642: 6 4i{io 
6 46; 6 45 II 

6 51: 649 12 

655 65313 

7 o 6 58 14 

I 
7 4' 7 2 15 
7 9 7 7 16 
714 711 17 
7 19 7 16 18 
724' 72119! 

729 72520 
7 34 7 30 *' 

730 7 35" 
744I 74023 
750 74624 

I I I 

7 55 7 5i*5| 

8 i| 7 57 

8 7 r 



936 



9 6 
9 16 
926 
936 

948 



9 14 12 o 
8 o 847 
658 718 
6060 



46 



89 



83 84 



85 86 87 



89 



Enter at top or bottom with the larger ar^'unieiit, wliether Latituile or Peclination, and at side with the tma'ler. 



COPYRIGHT. 



STARS AND SEXTANTS. 



43 




Enter at top or liottom with the larger argument, wliether Latitude or Declination, and at side with the smaller. 



4+ 



STARS AND SEXTANTS. 



CO Py EIGHT. 



















SEMIDIURNAL ARCS. 




















CONTRARY NAME. DECLINATION OR LATITUDE. CONTRARY NAME. 




1 






































































9 : 




c 

i 


67 


66 


65 


64 


63 


62 


61 


&> 


59 


58 


57 


56 


55 


54 


53 


52 


51 


50 


49 


48 


47 


46 


45 


i 






li m 


h m 


h IT 


h m 


h m 


li m 


h m 


h m 


h m 


li m 


h m 


h m 


h ID 


h m 


h m 


h m 


h m 


h m 


h m 


h m 


h m 


h m 


h m 






o 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 







I 


5 5° 


551 


551 


552 


552 


552 


5 53 


5 53 


5 53 


5 54 


5 54 


5 54 


5 54 


5 54 


5 55 


5 55 


5 55 


5 55 


5 55 


556 


5S6 


556 


556 


I 




2 


541 


5 42 


542 


5 43 


5 44 


5 44 


5 45 


546 


5 47 


5 47 


548 


548 


5 49 


5 49 


5 49 


5 5° 


5 5° 


5 5° 


551 


551 


5 51 


552 


552 


2 




3 


5 3' 


5 33 


5 34 


5 35 


536 


5 37 


538 


5 39 


5 4° 


54' 


541 


542 


5 43 


5 43 


5 44 


5 45 


5 45 


546 


546 


5 47 


5 47 


548 


548 


3' 




4 


522 


524 


525 


527 


528 


529 


531 


532 


5 33 


5 34 


5 35 


536 


5 37 


538 


5 39 


5 39 


540 


541 


542 


5 ''2 


5 43 


5 43 


5 44 


*i 




5 


512 


515 


517 


519 


5 20 


522 


524 


525 


527 


528 


529 


530 


531 


532 


5 33 


5 34 


5 35 


536 


5 37 


538 


538 


5 39 


540 


s' 




6 


5 2 


5 5 


5 8 


5 1° 


5 12 


514 


516 


518 


520 


521 


523 


524 


525 


527 


528 


529 


530 


531 


532 


5 33 


5 34 


5 35 


536 


6 




1 7 


4 53 


456 


4 59 


5 2 


5 4 


5 7 


5 9 


511 


513 


515 


516 


5.8 


520 


521 


522 


524 


525 


526 


528 


529 


530 


531 


532 


7 




8 


4 43 


446 


450 


4 53 


456 


4 59 


5 I 


5 4 


5 6 


5 8 


510 


512 


514 


515 


517 


519 


520 


521 


523 


524 


525 


527 


528 


8 




9 


432 


4 37 


441 


4 44 


448 


451 


4 54 


456 


4 59 


5 I 


5 4 


5 6 


5 8 


510 


511 


513 


515 


516 


518 


519 


521 


522 


524 


9J 




lO 


422 


427 


4 3' 


4 35 


4 39 


4 43 


446 


4 49 


452 


4 54 


4 57 


4 59 


5 2 


5 4 


5 6 


5 8 


510 


5" 


513 


5 IS 


5 16 


518 


519 


10 




II 


411 


4 16 


421 


4 26 


430 


4 34 


438 


441 


4 44 


448 


450 


4 53 


456 


458 


5 ° 


5 2 


5 4 


5 6 


5 8 


5 10 


5 12 


514 


515 


II 




12 


■* 2 


4 6 


412 


417 


421 


4 26 


430 


4 34 


4 37 


440 


4 44 


4 47 


4 49 


452 


4 54 


4 57 


4 59 


5 I 


5 3 


5 5 


5 7 


5 9 


5" 


12 




»3 


348 


3 55 


4 I 


4 7 


412 


417 


4 22 


4 20 


430 


4 33 


4 37 


4 4° 


4 43 


446 


4 49 


451 


4 54 


456 


458 


S I 


5 3 


5 5 


5 7 


13 




M 


336 


3 44 


351 


3 57 


4 3 


4 8 


413 


418 


422 


4 26 


4 3° 


4 33 


4 37 


440 


4 43 


446 


448 


451 


4 53 


456 


458 


5 


5 2 


14 1 




»S 


323 


332 


340 


3 47 


3 53 


3 59 


4 4 


4 9 


414 


418 


423 


4 26 


430 


4 33 


4 37 


4 4° 


4 43 


446 


448 


451 


4 53 


456 


458 


15 




i6 


310 


3 20 


328 


336 


3 43 


3 49 


3 55 


4 I 


4 6 


411 


415 


419 


423 


427 


431 


4 34 


4 37 


440 


4 43 


446 


448 


451 


4 53 


16 




!i7 


2 56 


3 7 


316 


325 


3 33 


3 39 


346 


352 


358 


4 3 


4 8 


412 


416 


420 


424 


4 28 


431 


4 35 


438 


441 


4 43 


446 


4 49 


'7 




i8 


240 


253 


3 3 


313 


3 22 


329 


336 


3 43 


3 49 


3 55 


4 


4 5 


4 9 


414 


418 


422 


425 


429 


432 


4 35 


438 


441 


4 44 


18 




19 


a 23 


237 


250 


3 


310 


318 


326 


3 34 


3 4° 


346 


352 


3 57 


4 2 


4 7 


411 


415 


419 


423 


427 


4 3° 


4 33 


436 


4 39 


19 




zo 


2 4 


2 21 


235 


247 


258 


3 7 


316 


324 


331 


338 


3 44 


3 49 


3 55 


4 


4 4 


4 9 


413 


417 


421 


425 


428 


431 


4 35 


20 




21 


141 


2 2 


218 


232 


244 


255 


3 5 


313 


321 


328 


3 35 


341 


3 47 


352 


3 57 


4 2 


4 7 


411 


415 


419 


423 


426 


430 


ZI 




22 


I II 


139 


2 


2 16 


2 30 


242 


253 


3 2 


31' 


319 


3 26 


3 33 


3 39 


3 45 


350 


3 55 


4 


4 5 


4 9 


413 


417 


421 


425 


22 




23 





I 10 


'38 


158 


2 14 


228 


2 40 


251 


3 


3 9 


317 


324 


331 


3 37 


3 43 


348 


3 54 


358 


4 3 


4 7 


412 


4 16 


420 


23 




V. 







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136 


156 


213 


2 26 


238 


249 


258 


3 7 


315 


322 


329 


3 35 


341 


3 47 


352 


3 57 


4 1 


4 6 


410 


414 


24 




^ 


6°7 


^^ 





I 8 


135 


155 


2 II 


2 25 


236 


247 


2 56 


3 5 


313 


3 20 


327 


3 33 


3 39 


3 45 


350 


3 55 


4 


4 5 


4 9 


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I 7 


134 


154 


2 9 


223 


235 


2 45 


255 


3 3 


3" 


319 


325 


332 


338 


3 43 


3 49 


3 54 


3 59 


4 3 


26 




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I 7 


133 


I 52 


2 8 


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233 


244 


253 


3 2 


310 


317 


324 


330 


336 


342 


348 


3 53 


3 57 


27 




^^^ 


65 





^^ 





I 6 


132 


151 


2 7 


2 20 


2 32 


2 42 


252 


3 


3 8 


316 


323 


329 


3 35 


341 


346 


352 


28 




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I 5 


131 


I 50 


2 6 


2 19 


231 


241 


250 


259 


3 7 


315 


3 22 


328 


334 


3 4° 


3 45 


29 






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63 


^ 







I 5 


130 


149 


2 5 


218 


2 30 


2 40 


249 


258 


3 6 


314 


321 


327 


3 33 


3 39 


30 






68 


^*^«s. ^v,^'' 





'V.^ 





I 4 


I 29 


I 48 


2 4 


217 


2 29 


239 


248 257 


3 5 


313 


320 


3 26 


332 


31 




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^ 


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N^ 





I 3 


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147 


2 3 


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228 


238 247 


256 


3 4 


312 


319 


325 


32 




o 







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I 3 


128 


147 


2 2 


215 


2 27 


237 


247 


255 


3 4 


3" 


318 


33 




22 





^ 


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^^ ^"^_ 


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^ 







I 2 


127 


145 


2 I 


214 


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255 


3 3 


310 


34 




21 
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114 


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72 


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225 


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245 


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I 16 





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117 





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314 


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228 


150 







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157 





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5 


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440 


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5 


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438 


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413 


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326 


258 


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516 


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451 


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432 


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^ 


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V 




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540 


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538 


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532 


530 


528 


525 


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519 


514 


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442 


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I 


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550 


5 49 


548 


548 


5 47 


546 


5 45 


5 44 


543 


541 


5 39 


5 37 


5 35 


531 


527 


522 


5 14 


5 2 


442 


4 















6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


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^ 




































Q 











^ 




























68 


69 


70 


7» 


72 


73 


74 


75 


76 


77 


78 


79 


80 


81 


82 


83 


84 


85 


&6 


8°7 


88 


89 


90 






Enter at top or buttora with the larjer argument, whether Latitude or Decliuatioii, and at side with the smaller. 






























■■""• 


^^^ 






^■"^ 










— ^-B 









COPYRIGHT. 



STARS AND SEXTANTS. 



45 



















SEMIDIURNAL ARCS. 


















CONTRARY NAME. DECLINATION OR LATITUDE. CONTRARY NAME. 


1 





































































1 




45 


44 


43 


42 


41 


40 


39 


38 


37 


36 


35 


34 


33 


32 


31 


30 


29 


28 


27 


26 


25 


24 


23 


s 
3 




h m 


h m 


h m 


h m 


h m 


h m 


h m 


h m 


h m 


h m 


h m 


Ii m 


h m 


h m 


h m 


h m 


li m 


h m 


h m 


h m 


h m 


h m 


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6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 





I 


S56 


556 


556 


556 


5 57 


5 57 


5 57 


5 57 


5 57 


5 57 


5 57 


5 57 


5 57 


558 


558 


558 


558 


558 


558 


558 


558 


558 


558 


I 


2 


5 52 


5 52 


5 53 


5 53 


5 53 


5 53 


5 54 


5 54 


5 54 


5 54 


5 54 


5 55 


5 55 


5 55 


5 55 


5 55 


556 


556 


556 


556 


556 


556 


5 57 


2 


3 


548 


548 


5 49 


5 49 


550 


5 5° 


550 


5 51 


5 5' 


551 


552 


552 


552 


552 


5 53 


5 53 


5 53 


5 54 


5 54 


5 54 


5 54 


5 55 


5 55 


3 


4 


5 44 


5 45 


5 45 


546 


546 


5 47 


5 47 


5 47 


548 


5 43 


5 49 


5 49 


550 


550 


550 


551 


5 5' 


5 5' 


552 


552 


5 53 


5 53 


5 53 


4 


5 


S40 


541 


5 4' 


542 


5 43 


5 43 


5 44 


5 44 


5 45 


5 45 


546 


546 


5 47 


5 47 


548 


548 


5 49 


5 49 


550 


550 


551 


55' 


5 5' 


5 


6 


536 


5 37 


538 


538 


5 39 


540 


540 


541 


542 


542 


5 43 


5 44 


5 44 


5 45 


546 


546 


5 47 


5 47 


548 


548 


5 49 


5 49 


550 


6 


7 


532 


5 33 


5 34 


5 35 


5 35 


536 


5 37 


538 


5 39 


540 


540 


51' 


542 


542 


5 43 


5 44 


5 44 


5 45 


546 


546 


5 47 


5 47 


548 


7 


8 


528 


529 


530 


531 


532 


5 33 


5 34 


5 35 


536 


5 37 


5 37 


538 


5 39 


540 


541 


541 


542 


5 43 


5 44 


5 44 


5 45 


546 


546 


8 


9 


524 


525 


526 


527 


528 


529 


531 


532 


5 33 


5 34 


5 35 


5 35 


536 


5 37 


538 


5 39 


540 


541 


541 


5 42 


5 43 


544 


5 45 


9 


lO 


519 


521 


522 


523 


525 


526 


527 


528 


529 


531 


532 


5 33 


5 34 


5 35 


536 


5 37 


538 


538 


5 39 


540 


5 4' 


542 


5 43 


10 


II 


5 15 


517 


518 


520 


521 


5 22 


524 


525 


526 


528 


529 


530 


531 


532 


5 33 


5 34 


5 35 


536 


5 37 


538 


5 39 


540 


541 


II 


\-iz 


511 


513 


514 


516 


517 


519 


5 20 


522 


523 


524 


526 


527 


528 


529 


531 


532 


5 33 


5 34 


5 35 


536 


5 37 


538 


5 39 


12 


13 


5 7 


5 8 


510 


5 12 


514 


515 


517 


518 


520 


521 


523 


524 


526 


527 


528 


529 


531 


532 


5 33 


5 34 


5 35 


536 


538 


'3 


14 


5 2 


5 4 


5 6 


5 8 


5 10 


5 12 


513 


515 


517 


518 


5 20 


5 21 


523 


524 


526 


527 


528 


530 


5 3' 


532 


5 33 


5 35 


536 


'4 


IS 


458 


5 


S 2 


5 4 


5 6 


5 8 


510 


512 


513 


5 15 


5 '7 


5 '8 


5 20 


5 21 


523 


524 


5 26 


527 


529 


530 


5 3' 


5 33 


5 34 


IS 


16 


4 53 


456 


458 


5 


5 2 


5 4 


S 6 


5 8 


510 


512 


514 


515 


517 


5 '9 


520 


522 


523 


525 


526 


528 


529 


531 


532 


16 


17 


4 49 


451 


4 54 


456 


458 


5 I 


5 3 


5 5 


5 7 


5 9 


5" 


5 '2 


5 14 


516 


5 '8 


519 


521 


523 


524 


526 


527 


529 


530 


'7 


18 


4 44 


4 47 


4 49 


452 


4 54 


4 57 


4 59 


5 I 


5 3 


5 5 


5 7 


5 9 


5 " 


5 13 


5 '5 


517 


5 '8 


5 20 


522 


524 


525 


527 


528 


18 


'9 


4 39 


442 


4 45 


448 


450 


4 53 


4 55 


458 


5 


5 2 


5 4 


5 6 5 8 


510 


512 


5 '4 


516 


518 


5 20 


521 


523 


525 


526 


'9 


20 


4 35 


438 


441 


4 43 


446 


4 49 


451 


4 54 


456 


4 59 


5 I 


5 3 


5 5 


5 7 


5 9 


5 " 


513 


5 '5 


5 '7 


5 '9 


5 21 


523 


524 


2o' 


I" 


430 


4 33 


436 


4 39 


442 


4 45 


448 


450 


4 53 


4 55 


458 


5 


5 2 


5 4 


5 7 


5 9 


5" 


513 


515 


5 '7 


519 


521 


5 22 


2l[ 


22 


425 


4 23 


431 


4 35 


438 


441 


4 44 


446 


4 49 


4 52 


4 54 


4 57 


4 59 


5 2 


5 4 


5 6 


5 8 


510 


5 12 


5'5 


517 


519 


521 


22 


23 


4 20 


423 


427 


430 


4 33 


4 37 


440 


4 43 


4 45 


448 


451 


4 53 


456 


458 


5 ' 


5 3 


5 6 


5 8 


510 


512 


514 


516 


518 


^3 


24 


414 


418 


422 


425 


429 


4 33 


436 


4 39 


442 


4 44 


4 47 


4 5^ 


4 53 


4 55 


458 


5 


5 3 


5 5 


5 7 


5 9 


5 '2 


5 '4 


> 


> 


25 


4 9 


413 


417 


421 


424 


428 


431 


4 35 


438 


44' 


4 44 


4 47 


450 


452 


4 55 


458 


5 


5 2 


5 5 


5 7 


5'0 


^ 


^ 




26 


4 3 


4 8 


412 


416 


4 20 


424 


427 


431 


4 34 


4 37 


440 


4 43 


446 


4 49 


452 


4 55 


4 57 


4 59 


5 2 


5 5 


^X' 





23 


-> 


27 


3 57 


4 2 


4 6 


411 


415 


419 


423 


4 26 


430 


4 33 


436 


440 


4 43 


446 


4 49 


452 


4 54 


4 57 


5 


^^ 


^ 


24 J 


^^^ 1 1 


28 


352 


356 


4 I 


4 6 


410 


414 


418 


422 


426 


429 


432 


436 


4 39 


4 43 


446 


448 


451 


4 54 


^x 


y^ 


25 


^/^ 1 1 


29 


3 45 


350 


3 55 


4 


4 4 


4 9 


413 


417 


421 


424 


428 


432 


436 


4 39 


442 


4 45 


448 


_^ 


^ 


26 


^ J\ 


30 


3 39 


3 44 


350 


3 55 


3 59 


4 4 


4 8 


412 


416 


4 20 


424 


428 


432 


4 35 


438 


442 


^ 


'K 


27 


^ ^^ 




31 


332 


338 


3 44 


3 49 


3 54 


3 59 


4 3 


4 8 


4 12 


4 i6 


4 20 


424 


428 


432 


4 35 


^y 


° J>^ ^^^ 


22 




32 


325 


331 


3 37 


3 43 


348 


3 53 


358 


4 3 


4 7 


412 


4 16 


4 20 


424 


428 


^X 


^a 


^■i^y^ ^y^ 


° 


^ 


X 


33 


318 


325 


331 


3 37 


3 42 


3 47 


3 53 


358 


4 3 


4 7 


412 


4 16 


4 20 


_^ 


^ 


30 


^y^ ^^r 







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34 


310 


317 


324 


3 3° 


336 


342 


3 47 


352 


353 


4 3 


4 8 


4 '2 




^ 


31 


^^ .-^ 





20 


^^ 


522 


22 


1 


























y^ 


32 




19 


^ 


526 


524 


21 


35 


3 2 


310 


317 


324 


330 


336 


342 


3 47 


3 53 


358 


4 3 


^ 


^ 


^^ ^^^ 


18 


^y 


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528 


5 2r) 


20 


36 


254 


3 2 


3 9 


317 


323 


329 


336 


342 


3 47 


3 53 


^X 


^^ 


jy^ .^^ 


17 














37 


244 


253 


3 I 


3 9 


316 


323 


330 


336 


342 


^^ 


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34^.^^ ^^ 


16 




533 


531 


5 3'^ 


528 


19' 


38 


234 


244 


253 


3 I 


3 9 


316 


323 


330 


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^ 


35 


^^^ ^^T 





y^ 


536 


534 


532 


53' 


530 


18 


39 


2 24 


234 


244 


2 53 


3 I 


3 9 


316 




^ 


36 


^^ ^^ 





'5 


y — 


538 


5 37 


536 


534 


5 33 


532 


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yf 


vy 


^-"^ ^ 





14 


^ 


541 


540 


5 39 


538 


536 


5 35 


534 


16 


40 


2 12 


2 24 


234 


2 44 


253 


3 I 


^ 


38 


.3/ ^^r 


*^ 


13 


^ 


544 


542 


5 4' 


540 


539 


538 


536 


535 


'5 


41 


' 59 


2 12 


223 


234 


244 


^X 







12 


^ 




















1 


42 


143 


158 


2 12 


2 23 


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39 


^^^ ^^^ 




ir 


^ 


^^ 


546 


5 45 


544 


5 43 


5 42 


541 


539 


5 38 


537 


14 


43 


'25 


M3 


158 


_^ 


^ 


40 


^^^ ^^ 





y^ 


548 


5 47 


546 


545 


5 44 


5 43 


542 


5 4' 


540 


539 


13 


44 


I 


125 




XT 


41 


^y^ ^^ 





xo 


^ 


550 


5 49 


548 


5 47 


546 


5 45 


5 44 


543 


542 


541 


540 


12 








yf 


42 




■^0 


9 


^ 


551 


551 


550 


5 49 


548 


547 


546 


546 


545 


5 44 


5 43 


542 


" 


45 





^ 


^3 


^>^ ^ 


^0 


8 


^ 


5 53 


552 


552 


5 5' 


550 


5 49 


548 


5 47 


5 47 


546 


5 45 


5 44 


543 


10 


^ 


< 




6 


7 


^ 


5 54 


5 54 


5 53 


553 


552 


55' 


550 


550 


5 49 


548 


547 


5 47 


546 


545 


9 




45 


^^^ ^^^ 





,^ 


f^ 


5 55 


5 55 


5 55 


5 54 


554 


5 53 


552 


551 


5 5' 


550 


5 49 


548 


548 


5 47 


547 


8 




^^^ ^^ 


"^ 


5 


^ 


556 


556 


556 


5 55 


5 55 


554 


5 54 


5 53 


552 


552 


5 5' 


5 5' 


550 


550 


5 49 


549 


7 


^^ ^^ 





4 




5 57 


5 57 


5 57 


556 


556 


5 55 


555 


5 54 


5 54 


5 53 


5 53 


552 


552 


5 5' 


5 5' 


550 


550 


6 


_^ 


-^o 


3 


^ 


"tss 


558 


558 


5 57 


5 57 


556 


556 


556 


5 55 


5 55 


5 54 


5 54 


5 54 


5 53 


5 53 


5 53 


552 


5 5' 


5 


^y^ 




1 


3 


^ 


5 59 


5 59 


558 


558 


5 58 


5 57 


5 57 


5 57 


556 


556 


556 


5 55 


5 55 


5 55 


5 54 


5 54 


5 54 


5 53 


552 


4 









<^^ 


559 


5 59 


5 59 


5 59 


5 59 


558 


558 


558 


558 


557 


5 57 


5 57 


5 57 


5 57 


556 


556 


556 


556 


5 55 


5 54 


3 







X^ 


6 


6 


5 59 


5 59 


5 59 


5 59 


5 59 


5 59 


558 


558 


558 


558 


558 


558 


558 


5 57 


5 57 


5 57 


5 57 


5 57 


556 


2 


" 




6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


5 59 


5 59 


559 


5 59 


5 59 


5 59 


5 59 


5 59 


5 59 


5 59 


5 59 


5 59 


558 


I 


to* 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 







^ 


Q 
































^ 





g 





g 

















Q 









1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


II 


12 


'3 


14 


15 


16 


'7 


18 


'9 


20 


21 


22 




Enter at top or bottom with the larger argument, whetlier Latitude or Declination, and at side with the smaller. 



46 



STARS AND SEXTANTS. 











ASTRONOMICAL 


REFRACTION. 






II 


Apparent 
Altitude. 1 


Height 


f the Barometer ( 


iiches) diminished by one-tenth of the Thei 


■iiioinetei 


•(degrees Falir.). 
























1 







20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


z% 41' 


29 48' 


30 57' 


32 7 


33 19 


34 32 


35' 46 


3/ 2' 


38' 19 


39 38 


40 58 




10 1 


26 59 


28 2 


29 6 


30 11 


31 17 


32 25 


33 34 


34 44 


35 56 


37 9 


38 23 




20 


25 31 


26 29 


27 28 


28 28 


29 30 


30 33 


31 37 


32 42 


33 48 


34 56 


36 5 




30 


24 10 


25 4 


25 59 


26 55 


27 52 


1% 50 


29 49 


30 49 


31 51 


32 54 


33 58 




40 


22 54 


23 44 


24 36 


25 27 


26 20 


27 14 


28 9 


29 5 


30 2 ; 


31 I 


32 I 




50 


21 45 


22 32 


23 20 


24 8 


24 57 


25 47 


26 38 


27 30 


28 23 


29 18 


30 14 


I 





20 43 


21 26 


22 10 


22 55 


23 41 


24 27 


25 14 


26 3 


26 53 


27 44 


28 36 




10 


19 45 


20 25 


21 6 


21 48 


22 30 


23 13 


23 57 


24 42 


25 29 


26 17 


27 6 




20 


18 49 


19 27 


20 5 


20 44 


21 24 


22 5 


22 47 


23 30 


24 14 


24 59 


25 45 




30 


17 58 


18 33 


19 9 


19 46 


20 24 


21 3 


21 43 


22 23 


23 4 


23 46 


24 29 




40 


17 10 


17 43 


18 17 


18 52 


19 28 


20 5 


20 42 


21 20 


21 59 


22 39 


23 20 




50 


16 24 


16 56 


17 29 


18 2 


18 36 


19 II 


19 46 


20 22 


20 59 


21 37 


22 15 


2 





15 42 


16 13 


16 44 


17 16 


17 48 


18 21 


18 55 


19 29 


20 4 


20 40 


21 16 




10 


15 4 


15 33 


16 3 


16 33 


17 4 


17 35 


18 7 


18 40 


19 13 


19 47 


20 21 




20 


14 28 


14 56 


15 24 


15 53 


16 22 


16 52 


17 22 


17 53 


18 25 


18 57 


19 30 




30 


13 54 


14 21 


14 48 


15 15 


15 43 


16 12 


16 41 


17 II 


17 41 


18 12 


18 43 




40 


13 23 


13 49 


14 15 


14 41 


15 8 


15 35 


16 3 


16 31 


17 


17 29 


17 59 




50 


12 54 


13 19 


13 44 


14 9 


14 34 


15 


15 27 


15 54 


16 21 


16 49 


17 17 


3 





12 26 


12 50 


13 14 


13 38 


14 2 


14 27 


14 52 


15 18 


15 44 


16 II 


16 38 




10 


12 


12 23 


12 45 


13 8 


13 32 


■3 56 


14 20 


14 45 


15 10 


15 35 


16 I 




20 


" 35 


" 57 


12 19 


12 41 


13 4 


13 27 


13 5^^ 


14 14 


14 38 


15 2 


15 27 




30 


II 13 


II 34 


II 55 


12 16 


1 2 38 


13 


13 22 


13 45 


14 8 


14 32 


14 56 




40 


10 51 


II II 


II 31 


II 52 


12 13 


12 34 


12 56 


13 18 


13 40 


14 3 


14 26 




50 


10 31 


10 50 


II 9 


II 29 


II 49 


12 10 


12 31 


12 52 


13 14 


13 36 


13 58 


4 





10 12 


10 30 


10 49 


II 8 


1 1 27 


II 47 


12 7 


12 28 


12 49 


13 10 


13 31 




lO 


9 54 


10 12 


10 30 


10 48 


II 7 


1 1 26 


1 1 46 


12 6 


12 26 


12 46 


13 6 




20 


9 37 


9 54 


10 12 


10 30 


10 48 


II 6 


II 25 


II 44 


12 3 


12 23 


12 42 1 




30 


9 20 


9 37 


9 54 


10 II 


10 29 


10 46 


II 5 


II 23 


II 42 


12 I 


12 20 ' 




40 


9 5 


9 21 


9 37 


9 54 


10 II 


10 28 


10 46 


II 4 


II 22 


II 41 


12 




50 


8 50 


9 6 


9 22 


9 38 


9 54 


10 1 1 


10 28 


10 45 


II 3 


II 21 


11 39 


5 





8 35 


8 50 


9 6 


9 22 


9 38 


9 54 


10 1 1 


10 28 


10 45 


II 2 


II 19 




10 


8 21 


8 36 


8 51 


9 7 


9 22 


9 38 


9 54 


10 II 


10 27 


10 44 


II I 




20 


8 8 


8 23 


8 38 


8 53 


9 8 


9 23 


9 39 


9 55 


10 II 


10 27 


10 44 




30 


7 56 


8 10 


8 25 


8 39 


8 54 


9 9 


9 24 


9 40 


9 55 


10 II 


10 27 




40 


7 44 


7 58 


8 12 


8 26 


8 40 


8 55 


9 10 


9 ^5 


9 40 


9 55 


10 II 




50 


7 33 


7 46 


8 


8 14 


8 28 


8 42 


8 57 


9 II 


9 26 


9 41 


9 56 


6 





7 23 


7 36 


7 50 


8 3 


8 16 


8 30 


8 44 


8 58 


9 13 


9 27 


9 42 




10 


7 13 


7 26 


7 39 


7 52 


8 5 


8 18 


8 32 


8 46 


9 


9 14 


9 28 




20 


7 3 


7 15 


7 28 


7 41 


7 54 


8 7 


8 20 


8 34 


8 48 


9 2 


9 16 




30 


6 54 


7 6 


7 18 


7 31 


7 43 


7 56 


8 9 


8 23 


8 36 


8 49 


9 3 




40 


6 44 


6 56 


7 8 


7 20 


7 32 


7 45 


7 58 


8 II 


8 24 


8 37 


8 50 




50 


6 36 


6 47 


6 59 


7 II 


7 23 


7 35 


7 47 


8 


8 13 


8 26 


8 39 


7 





6 27 


6 38 


6 50 


7 I 


7 13 


7 2; 


7 37 


7 50 


8 2 


8 14 


8 27 




10 


6 19 


6 30 


6 42 


6 53 


7 4 


7 16 


7 28 


7 40 


7 52 


8 4 


8 17 




20 


6 12 


6 23 


6 34 


6 45 


6 56 


7 7 


7 19 


7 31 


7 43 


7 55 


8 7 




30 


6 5 


6 15 


6 26 


6 37 


6 48 


6 59 


7 10 


7 22 


7 34 


7 46 


7 58 




40 


5 57 


6 7 


6 18 


6 28 


6 39 


6 50 


7 I 


7 13 


7 24 


7 36 


7 48 




50 


5 50 


6 


6 10 


6 21 


6 31 


6 42 


6 53 


7 4 


7 15 


7 26 


7 38 


8 





5 44 


5 54 


6 4 


6 14 


6 24 


6 35 


6 46 


6 56 


7 7 


7 18 


7 30 




IC 


5 37 


5 47 


5 57 


6 7 


6 17 


6 27 


6 37 


6 47 


6 58 


7 9 


7 21 




20 


5 31 


5 40 


5 50 


6 


6 10 


6 20 


6 30 


6 40 


6 51 


7 2 


7 13 




30 


5 25 


5 34 


5 44 


5 S3 


6 3 


6 13 


6 23 


6 33 


6 44 


6 54 


7 5 




40 


5 20 


5 29 


5 38 


5 48 


5 57 


6 7 


6 .7 


6 27 


6 37 


6 47 


6 58 




50 


5 14 


5 23 


5 32 


5 41 


5 50 


6 


6 10 


6 20 


6 30 


6 40 


6 50 


9 





5 9 


5 18 


5 27 


5 36 


5 45 


5 54 


6 4 


6 13 


6 23 


6 33 


6 43 




10 


5 4 


5 12 


5 21 


5 30 


5 39 


5 4'^ 


5 57 


6 7 


6 16 


6 26 


6 36 




20 


4 58 


5 6 


5 15 


5 24 


5 33 


5 42 


5 5' 


6 


6 10 


6 19 


6 29 




30 


4 53 


5 ' 


5 10 


5 '9 


5 27 


5 36 


5 45 


5 54 


6 3 


6 12 


6 22 




40 


4 49 


4 57 


5 6 


5 14 


5 22 


5 3' 


5 40 


5 49 


5 58 


6 7 


6 16 




50 


4 44 


4 52 


5 


5 8 


5 16 


5 25 


5 34 


5 43 


5 52 


6 I 


6 10 


10 





4 39 


4 47 


4 55 


5 3 


5 II 


5 20 


5 29 


5 37 


5 46 


5 55 


6 4 





STARS AND SEXTANTS. 



47 







ASTRONOMICAL 


REFRACTION. 








Apparent 
Altitude. 


Height of the Barometer (inches) diminished by one 


-tenth of the Tliermometer (degrees Fahr. ). 
























10 


20 


21 


22 


23 

5' 3' 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


4' 39 


4 47' 


4' 55' 


5' 11' 


5' 20 


5' 29' 


i zi 


s'46' 


/ // 

5 55 


/ // 
6 4 


10 


4 35 


4 43 


4 51 


4 59 


5 7 


5 15 


5 24 


5 32 


5 41 


5 49 


5 58 


20 


4 31 


4 38 


4 46 


4 54 


5 2 


5 10 


5 18 


5 27 


5 35 


5 43 


5 52 


30 


4 27 


4 34 


4 42 


4 50 


4 58 


5 6 


5 14 


5 22 


5 30 


5 38 


5 47 


40 


4 22 


4 29 


4 37 


4 45 


4 53 


5 I 


5 9 


5 17 


5 25 


5 33 


5 42 


50 


4 18 


4 25 


4 33 


4 40 


4 48 


4 56 


5 4 


5 12 


5 20 


5 28 


5 36 


II 


4 14 


4 21 


4 29 


4 36 


4 44 


4 52 


5 


5 7 


5 15 


5 23 


5 31 


10 


4 II 


4 18 


4 26 


4 33 


4 40 


4 48 


4 56 


5 3 


5 II 


5 19 


5 27 


1 20 


4 8 


4 15 


4 22 


4 29 


4 36 


4 44 


4 52 


4 59 


5 7 


5 15 


5 23 


30 


4 4 


4 II 


4 18 


4 25 


4 32 


4 40 


4 48 


4 55 


5 3 


5 10 


5 18 


40 


4 I 


4 8 


4 15 


4 22 


4 29 


4 36 


4 44 


4 SI 


4 59 


5 6 


5 14 


50 


3 58 


4 4 


4 II 


4 18 


4 25 


4 32 


4 39 


4 47 


4 54 


5 I 


5 9 


12 


3 55 


4 I 


4 8 


4 14 


4 21 


4 28 


4 35 


4 42 


4 50 


4 57 


5 4 


10 


3 52 


3 58 


4 5 


4 II 


4 18 


4 25 


4 32 


4 39 


4 46 


4 S3 


5 


20 


3 48 


3 54 


4 I 


4 7 


4 14 


4 21 


4 28 


4 35 


4 42 


4 49 


4 56 


30 


3 45 


3 51 


3 58 


4 4 


4 II 


4 18 


4 24 


4 31 


4 38 


4 45 


4 52 


40 


3 42 


3 48 


3 55 


4 I 


4 7 


4 14 


4 20 


4 27 


4 34 


4 41 


4 48 


so 


3 40 


3 46 


3 52 


3 58 


4 4 


4 II 


4 18 


4 24 


4 30 


4 37 


4 44 


13 


3 37 


3 43 


3 49 


3 55 


4 I 


4 8 


4 15 


4 21 


4 27 


4 34 


4 41 


10 


3 34 


3 40 


3 46 


3 52 


3 58 


4 5 


4 12 


4 i8 


4 24 


4 31 


4 38 


20 


3 32 


3 38 


3 44 


3 50 


3 56 


4 2 


4 8 


4 IS 


4 21 


4 27 


4 34 


30 


3 29 


3 35 


3 41 


3 47 


3 S3 


3 59 


4 5 


4 12 


4 18 


4 24 


4 31 


40 


3 27 


3 32 


3 38 


3 44 


3 50 


3 56 


4 2 


4 8 


4 14 


4 20 


4 27 


50 


3 24 


3 29 


3 35 


3 41 


3 47 


3 53 


3 59 


4 5 


4 II 


4 17 


4 24 


14 


3 21 


3 26 


3 32 


3 38 


3 44 


3 50 


3 56 


4 2 


4 8 


4 14 


4 21 


10 


3 19 


3 24 


3 30 


3 35 


3 41 


3 47 


3 53 


3 59 


4 5 


4 II 


4 18 


20 


3 17 


3 22 


3 28 


3 33 


3 39 


3 45 


3 51 


3 57 


4 3 


4 9 


4 15 


30 


3 15 


3 20 


3 25 


3 31 


3 36 


3 42 


3 48 


3 54 


4 


4 6 


4 12 


40 


3 13 


3 18 


3 24 


3 29 


3 34 


3 40 


3 46 


3 51 


3 57 


4 3 


4 9 


50 


3 10 


3 15 


3 21 


3 26 


3 31 


3 37 


3 43 


3 48 


3 54 


4 


4 6 


15 


3 8 


3 13 


3 19 


3 24 


3 29 


3 35 


3 41 


3 46 


3 52 


3 57 


4 3 


10 


3 6 


3 II 


3 16 


3 21 


3 26 


3 32 


3 38 


3 43 


3 49 


3 54 


4 


20 


3 4 


3 9 


3 14 


3 19 


3 24 


3 30 


3 36 


3 41 


3 47 


3 52 


3 58 


30 


3 2 


3 7 


3 12 


3 17 


3 22 


3 28 


3 33 


3 39 


3 44 


3 49 


3 55 


40 


3 


3 5 


3 lO 


3 15 


3 20 


3 25 


3 30 


3 36 


3 41 


3 46 


3 52 


SO 


2 58 


3 3 


3 8 


3 13 


3 18 


3 23 


3 28 


3 34 


3 39 


3 44 


3 50 


16 


2 s6 


3 I 


3 6 


3 II 


3 16 


3 21 


3 26 


3 32 


3 37 


3 42 


3 48 


10 


2 54 


2 59 


3 4 


3 9 


3 14 


3 19 


3 24 


3 30 


3 35 


3 40 


3 46 


20 


2 52 


2 57 


3 2 


3 7 


3 12 


3 17 


3 22 


3 27 


3 32 


3 37 


3 43 


30 


2 SI 


2 55 


3 


3 5 


3 10 


3 15 


3 20 


3 25 


3 30 


3 35 


3 41 


40 


2 49 


2 53 


2 58 


3 3 


3 8 


3 13 


3 18 


3 23 


3 28 


3 33 


3 39 


SO 


2 47 


2 51 


2 56 


3 I 


3 6 


3 II 


3 .6 


3 21 


3 26 


3 31 


3 36 


17 


2 45 


2 49 


2 54 


2 59 


3 4 


3 9 


3 14 


3 19 


3 24 


3 29 


3 34 


10 


2 44 


2 48 


2 53 


2 57 


3 2 


3 7 


3 12 


3 >7 


3 22 


3 27 


3 32 


20 


2 42 


2 46 


2 51 


2 55 


3 


3 5 


3 10 


3 15 


3 20 


3 25 


3 3° 


30 


2 40 


2 44 


2 49 


2 53 


2 58 


3 3 


3 8 


3 12 


3 17 


3 22 


3 27 


40 


2 38 


2 42 


2 47 


2 51 


2 56 


3 I 


3 6 


3 10 


3 15 


3 20 


3 25 


50 


2 37 


2 41 


2 46 


2 50 


2 55 


3 


3 5 


3 9 


3 14 


3 19 


3 24 


18 


2 36 


2 40 


2 45 


2 49 


2 53 


2 58 


3 3 


3 7 


3 12 


3 17 


3 22 


10 


2 34 


2 38 


2 43 


2 47 


2 51 


2 56 


3 I 


3 S 


3 10 


3 15 


3 20 


20 


2 33 


2 37 


2 42 


2 46 


2 50 


2 55 


3 


3 4 


3 9 


3 13 


3 18 


30 


2 31 


2 35 


2 40 


2 44 


2 48 


2 53 


2 58 


3 2 


3 7 


3 II 


3 16 


40 


2 30 


2 34 


2 38 


2 42 


2 46 


2 51 


2 56 


3 


3 5 


3 9 


3 14 


50 


2 29 


2 33 


2 37 


2 41 


2 45 


2 50 


2 54 


2 59 


3 3 


3 7 


3 12 


19 


2 27 


2 31 


2 35 


2 39 


2 43 


2 48 


2 52 


2 57 


3 I 


3 5 


3 10 


10 


2 26 


2 30 


2 34 


2 38 


2 42 


2 47 


2 51 


2 56 


3 


3 4 


3 9 


20 


2 25 


2 29 


2 33 


2 37 


2 41 


2 45 


2 49 


2 54 


2 58 


3 2 


3 7 


30 


2 24 


2 28 


2 32 


2 36 


2 40 


2 44 


2 48 


2 53 


2 57 


3 I 


3 6 


40 


2 22 


2 26 


2 30 


2 34 


2 38 


2 42 


2 46 


2 51 


2 55 


2 59 


3 4 


50 


2 21 


2 25 


2 29 


2 33 


2 37 


2 41 


2 45 


2 49 


2 S3 


2 57 


3 2 


20 


2 19 


2 23 


2 27 


2 31 


2 35 


2 39 


2 43 


2 47 


2 51 


2 55 


3 



48 



STARS AND SEXTANTS. 







ASTRONOMICAL 


REFRACTION. 










Apparent 
Altitude, 

20 


Height of the Barometer (inches) diminished by one 


-tenth 


' the Thermometer (degrees Fahr.). 




20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 




2 19 


2 23 


2 27 


2 31 


2 35 


2 39 


2 43 


2 47 


/ // 
2 51 


2 55 


3 




10 


2 18 


2 22 


2 26 


2 3D 


2 34 


2 38 


2 42 


2 46 


2 50 


2 54 


2 59 




20 


2 17 


2 20 


2 24 


2 28 


2 32 


2 36 


2 40 


2 44 


2 48 


2 52 


2 57 




30 


2 16 


2 19 


2 23 


2 27 


2 3' 


2 35 


2 39 


2 43 


2 47 


2 51 


2 s6 




40 


2 15 


2 18 


2 22 


2 26 


2 30 


2 34 


2 38 


2 42 


2 46 


2 so 


2 54 




50 


2 13 


2 16 


2 20 


2 24 


2 28 


2 32 


2 36 


2 40 


2 44 


2 48 


2 52 




21 


2 12 


2 IS 


2 19 


2 23 


2 27 


2 31 


2 35 


2 39 


2 43 


2 47 


2 SI 




10 


2 11 


2 14 


2 18 


2 22 


2 26 


2 30 


2 34 


2 38 


2 42 


2 46 


2 50 




20 


2 10 


2 13 


2 17 


2 21 


2 25 


2 29 


2 33 


2 37 


2 41 


2 45 


2 49 




30 


2 9 


2 12 


2 16 


2 19 


2 23 


2 27 


2 32 


2 35 


2 39 


2 43 


2 47 




40 


2 8 


2 II 


2 15 


2 18 


2 22 


2 26 


2 30 


2 33 


2 37 


2 41 


2 45 




50 


2 7 


2 10 


2 14 


2 17 


2 21 


2 25 


2 29 


2 32 


2 36 


2 40 


2 44 




22 


2 6 


2 9 


2 13 


2 16 


2 20 


2 24 


2 28 


2 31 


2 35 


2 39 


2 43 




! 10 


2 4 


2 7 


2 II 


2 14 


2 18 


2 22 


2 26 


2 29 


2 33 


2 37 


2 41 




20 


2 3 


2 6 


2 10 


2 13 


2 17 


2 21 


2 25 


2 28 


2 32 


2 36 


2 40 




30 


2 3 


2 6 


2 10 


2 13 


2 16 


2 20 


2 23 


2 27 


2 31 


2 35 


2 39 




40 


2 2 


2 5 


2 9 


2 12 


2 15 


2 19 


2 22 


2 26 


2 29 


2 33 


2 37 




50 


2 I 


2 4 


2 8 


2 1 1 


2 14 


2 iS 


2 21 


2 25 


2 28 


2 32 


2 36 




23 


2 


2 3 


2 7 


2 10 


2 13 


2 17 


2 20 


2 24 


2 27 


2 31 


2 35 




10 


I 59 


2 2 


2 6 


2 9 


2 12 


2 16 


2 19 


2 23 


2 26 


2 30 


2 34 




20 


I 58 


2 I 


2 5 


2 8 


2 1 1 


2 IS 


2 18 


2 22 


2 25 


2 29 


2 33 




30 


I 57 


2 


2 4 


2 7 


2 10 


2 14 


2 17 


2 21 


2 24 


2 28 


2 32 




40 


I 56 


I 59 


2 3 


2 6 


2 9 


2 13 


2 16 


2 20 


2 23 


2 27 


2 31 




50 


I 56 


I 59 


2 2 


2 5 


2 8 


2 12 


2 15 


2 19 


2 22 


2 2S 


2 29 




24 


I 55 


I 58 


2 I 


2 4 


2 7 


2 I I 


2 14 


2 18 


2 21 


2 24 


2 28 




10 


I 54 


I 57 


2 


2 3 


2 6 


2 10 


2 13 


2 17 


2 20 


2 23 


2 27 




20 


I 53 


I 56 


I 59 


2 2 


2 5 


2 9 


2 12 


2 16 


2 19 


2 22 


2 26 




30 


I 52 


I 55 


I 58 


2 I 


2 4 


2 8 


2 1 1 


2 IS 


2 18 


2 21 


2 25 




40 


I 51 


I 54 


J 57 


2 


2 3 


2 7 


2 IC 


2 14 


2 17 


2 20 


2 24 




50 


I 50 


I 53 


I 56 


' 59 


2 2 


2 6 


2 9 


2 13 


2 16 


2 19 


2 23 




25 


I 49 


I 52 


I 55 


I 58 


2 I 


2 5 


2 8 


2 12 


2 15 


2 18 


2 22 




10 


I 49 


I 52 


I 55 


I 58 


2 I 


2 4 


2 7 


2 10 


2 13 


2 16 


2 20 




20 


I 48 


I 51 


I 54 


' 57 


2 


2 3 


2 6 


2 9 


2 12 


2 IS 


2 19 




30 


I 47 


1 so 


I S3 


1 s6 


I 59 


2 2 


2 5 


2 8 


2 1 1 


2 14 


2 18 




40 


1 46 


I 49 


I 52 


I 55 


I s8 


2 I 


2 4 


^ I 


2 10 


2 13 


2 17 




50 


I 45 


I 48 


J 51 


I 54 


' 57 


2 


2 3 


2 6 


2 9 


2 12 


2 16 




26 


I 44 


I 47 


I so 


' 53 


I 56 


I 59 


2 2 


2 5 


2 8 


2 II 


2 15 




10 


I 43 


I 46 


I 49 


1 52 


I 55 


I 58 


2 I 


2 4 


2 7 


2 10 


2 14 




20 


I 43 


I 46 


I 49 


I S2 


I 55 


I s8 


2 I 


2 4 


2 7 


2 10 


2 13 




30 


I 42 


I 45 


I 48 


1 51 


I 54 


I 57 


2 


2 3 


2 6 


2 9 


2 12 




40 


I 42 


I 44 


I 47 


I 50 


I 53 


I 56 


I 59 


2 2 


2 5 


2 8 


2 II 




50 


I 41 


I 43 


, 46 


I 49 


I 52 


I 55 


I s8 


2 I 


2 4 


2 7 


2 10 




27 


1 40 


I 42 


I 45 


I 48 


I 51 


• 54 


I 57 


2 


2 3 


2 6 


2 9 




10 


I 39 


I 41 


I 44 


I 47 


I 50 


• 53 


I s6 


I 59 


2 2 


2 5 


2 8 




20 


I 39 


I 41 


I 44 


I 47 


I 50 


I 53 


I s6 


I 59 


2 2 


2 5 


2 8 




30 


I 38 


I 40 


I 43 


I 46 


I 49 


I 52 


I 55 


I 58 


2 I 


2 4 


2 7 




40 


I 37 


I 39 


I 42 


I 45 


I 48 


1 51 


I 54 


I 57 


2 


2 3 


2 6 




50 


I 36 


I 38 


I 41 


I 44 


I 47 


1 50 


I 53 


I 56 


I 59 


2 2 


2 5 




28 


' 35 


I 38 


I 40 


I 43 


, 46 


I 49 


I S2 


I 55 


I 58 


2 I 


2 4 




10 


I 35 


I 37 


I 40 


I 43 


I 46 


I 49 


I 52 


I 54 


I 57 


2 


2 3 




20 


' 35 


I 37 


I 40 


I 42 


I 45 


I 48 


I 51 


I 53 


I s6 


I 59 


2 2 




30 


I 34 


I 36 


1 39 


I 41 


I 44 


I 47 


I 50 


I 52 


I 55 


I 58 


2 I 




40 


I 33 


I 35 


I 38 


I 40 


I 43 


I 46 


I 49 


' 51 


I 54 


' 57 


2 




• 50 


I 33 


I 35 


I 38 


I 40 


I 43 


I 46 


I 49 


' 5« 


I 54 


I 57 


2 




29 


I 32 


I 34 


I 37 


I 39 


I 42 


I 45 


I 48 


I so 


I 53 


I s6 


I 59 




10 


I 31 


I 33 


I 36 


I 38 


I 41 


I 44 


I 47 


I 50 


I 53 


I 56 


I 59 




20 


I 31 


I 33 


I 36 


I 38 


1 41 


I 44 


I 47 


I 49 


I 52 


I 55 


I s8 




30 


I 30 


I 32 


» 35 


1 37 


I 40 


I 43 


I 46 


I 49 


I 52 


I 55 


I s8 




40 


I 29 


I 31 


I 34 


I 36 


I 39 


I 42 


I 45 


I 48 


I 51 


' 54 


I 57 




50 


1 29 


I 31 


» 33 


I 35 


I 38 


I 42 


I 45 


I 47 


I so 


1 53 


I s6 




30 


I 28 


I 30 


I 32 


I 34 


I 37 


I 41 


I 44 


I 46 


I 49 


I 52 


I 55 





STARS AND SEXTANTS. 



49 







ASTRONOMICAL 


REFRACTION. 










Height of the Barometer (inches) diminished by one 


tenth of 


the Thermometer (degrees 


Fahr.). 


Apparent 
Altitude. 

30 


° 






















20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


23 


29 


30 


i' 28" 


i' 30' 


l' 32' 


i' 34 


' 37 


i' 41' 


i' 44' 


I 46 


/ // 
I 49 


i' 52" 


'' 55" 


31 


I 25 


I 27 


I 29 


I 3' 


I 34 


I 37 


I 40 


I 42 


I 45 


I 48 


1 50 


32 


I 22 


I 24 


1 26 


I 28 


I 30 


I 33 


I 36 


I 38 


I 40 


I 43 


I 45 


33 


I 19 


I 21 


I 23 


I 25 


I 27 


I 30 


I 32 


I 34 


I 36 


I 39 


I 41 


34 


I 16 


I 18 


I 20 


I 22 


I 24 


I 26 


1 28 


I 30 


I 32 


' 35 


I 37 


35 


I 13 


' 15 


I 17 


I 19 


I 21 


I 23 


I 25 


I 27 


I 29 


I 31 


» 34 


36 


1 10 


I 12 


I 14 


I 16 


I 18 


I 20 


I 22 


I 24 


I 26 


I 28 


I 3' 


37 


I 7 


I 9 


I 1 1 


I 13 


I >5 


I 17 


I 19 


I 21 


I 23 


I 25 


I 27 


38 


I 5 


I 7 


I 9 


I II 


I 13 


I 15 


' 17 


I 18 


I 20 


I 22 


I 24 


39 


1 3 


I 5 


I 6 


I 8 


I 10 


I 12 


I 14 


I 15 


I 17 


I 19 


I 21 


40 


I I 


I 3 


' 4 


I 6 


I 8 


I 10 


I 12 


I 13 


I '5 


1 17 


I 19 


41 


59 


I I 


I 2 


I 4 


I 5 


' 7 


I 9 


I 10 


I 12 


I 14 


I 16 


e2 


57 


59 


I 


I 2 


I 3 


I 5 


I 7 


I 8 


I 10 


I 12 


I 14 


43 


55 


57 


58 


I 


I I 


I 3 


I 5 


I 6 


I 7 


I 9 


I 1 1 


44 


S3 


54 


55 


57 


58 


I 


I 2 


I 3 


I 4 


I 6 


I 8 


45 


51 


52 


53 


55 


56 


58 


I 


I I 


I 2 


I 4 


I 6 


46 


49 


50 


51 


53 


54 


56 


57 


1% 


59 


I I 


I 3 


47 


47 


48 


49 


51 


52 


54 


55 


56 


57 


S9 


I I 


48 


46 


47 


48 


50 


51 


53 


54 


55 


s6 


s8 


I 


49 


45 


46 


47 


48 


49 


51 


52 


S3 


54 


56 


58 


50 


43 


44 


45 


46 


47 


49 


50 


51 


S2 


53 


55 


SI 


41 


42 


43 


44 


45 


47 


48 


49 


so 


SI 


53 


52 


40 


41 


42 


43 


44 


46 


4- 


48 


49 


50 


52 


53 


39 


40 


41 


42 


43 


44 


45 


46 


47 


48 


50 


54 


37 


38 


39 


40 


41 


42 


43 


44 


45 


46 


47 


55 


036 


37 


38 


39 


40 


41 


42 


43 


44 


45 


46 


56 


34 


35 


36 


37 


38 


39 


40 


41 


42 


43 


44 


57 


33 


34 


35 


36 


37 


38 


39 


40 


4 I 


42 


43 


58 


32 


33 


33 


34 


35 


36 


3- 


38 


39 


40 


41 


59 


31 


32 


32 


33 


34 


35 


36 


37 


38 


39 


40 


60 


30 


30 


31 


32 


33 


34 


34 


35 


36 


37 


38 


61 


28 


28 


29 


30 


31 


32 


32 


33 


34 


35 


36 


62 


27 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


31 


32 


33 


34 


35 


63 


26 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


30 


31 


32 


33 


34 


64 


25 


25 


26 


26 


27 


28 


29 


29 


30 


31 


32 


65 


24 


24 


25 


25 


26 


27 


28 


28 


29 


29 


30 


66 


23 


23 


24 


24 


25 


26 


27 


27 


28 


28 


29 


67 


22 


22 


23 


23 


24 


25 


26 


26 


27 


27 


28 


68 


21 


21 


22 


22 


23 


24 


25 


25 


26 


26 


27 


69 


20 


20 


21 


21 


21 


22 


23 


23 


24 


24 


25 


70 


19 


19 


20 


20 


20 


21 


22 


22 


23 


23 


24 


71 


18 


18 


19 


19 


19 


20 


21 


21 


22 


22 


23 


72 


17 


17 


18 


18 


18 


19 


19 


20 


20 


20 


21 


73 


16 


16 


17 


17 


17 


18 


18 


19 


19 


19 


20 


74 


15 


15 


16 


16 


16 


17 


17 


18 


iS 


iS 


19 


75 


14 


14 


15 


15 


15 


16 


16 


17 


17 


17 


18 


76 


13 


13 


14 


14 


14 


15 


IS 


16 


16 


16 


17 


77 


12 


12 


12 


12 


12 


13 


13 


14 


14 


14 


15 


78 


II 


II 


II 


1 1 


11 


12 


12 


13 


13 


13 


13 


79 


10 


10 


10 


10 


10 


II 


11 


12 


12 


12 


12 


80 


9 


9 


9 


9 


9 


10 


10 


II 


II 


1 1 


II 


81 


8 


8 


8 


8 


8 


9 


9 


10 


10 


10 


10 


82 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7 


8 


8 


9 


9 


9 


9 


83 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


7 


7 


8 


8 


8 


8 


84 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


6 


() 


7 


7 


7 


7 1 


85 


4 


4 


4 


4 


5 


° 5 


5 


6 


6 


6 


6 


86 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


87 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


88 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


89 


I 


I 


I 


1 


I 


I 


I 


I 


I 


I 


I 


90 


































1 



NOTES ON THE STARS. 



The following brief directions may, it is hoped, be found useful by some in 
enabling them to identify the stars used herein. The stars, with the addition of a 
few others inserted for purposes of description, will be found under their respective 
constellations. 

The beginner should make himself familiar with the more conspicuous constel- 
lations and groups, such as the Great Bear, Cassiopeia, Orion, Square of Pegasus, 
the Pleiades, and others, and from these he can take directions and measurements 
so as to become acquainted with the less conspicuous heavenly bodies and 
configurations. 

Andromeda : a Andromcd?e or Alpheratz. 

A line drawn from Polaris through ^ Cassiopeice and produced to the 
same distance beyond points to Alpheratz. This star is sometimes called 
h Pegasi, and forms the north-eastern corner of the well-known and conspicu- 
ous Square of Pegasus. 
y Andromedce or Alamak. 

This is one of the three principal stars in Andromeda, viz., Alpheratz, 
ft Andromedre, and Alamak. They are situated on the line which extends 
east and north from Alpheratz, and their position is determined by the line 
joining a Pegasi (Markab) and Alpheratz produced to the eastward. 

Aquila : a Aquilre or Altair. 

A line drawn from Polaris midway between Deneb and Vega, and 
produced to an equal distance beyond them, passes through Altair, a bright 
star between two small ones (y and ft Aquila), the three lying in the 
direction of Vega. Altair, Deneb, and Vega form a very large and con- 
spicuous triangle. 

Argo : a Argfls or Canopus. 

A line drawn from Bellatrix between Rigel and the most northern star 
of Orion's Belt nearly strikes Canopus. 

ft Argfls lies almost midway between Canopus and a Crucis, but a 
little nearer the South Pole. 

y Argils lies to the west of ft Argus, and is one of five stars nearly in a 
straight line. It is about as far to the north of ft Argtis as the latter is from 
the South Pole. 

€ ArgAs lies midway between ft and y Argus. 

Aries : a Arietis or Hamel. 

About 20° due south of Alamak is a cc)nsi)icuous star group composed 
of Hamel and ft and y Arietis. Hamel forms a large isosceles triangle with 
ft Andromed^e and Alamak, and is readily visible. A line drawn from 
Betelguese through Aldebaran passes at 30' distance through it. 



NOTES ON THE STARS. 51 

Auriga : a Auiigre or Capella. 

A line drawn from Polaris at right angles to the line of the Pointers 
(a and (i UrsK Majoris) and away from the Great Bear, passes at 45° 
distance through the bright yellow star Capella, which may be instantly 
recognised. 

Bootes : a Bootis or Arcturus. 

The curve formed by the three stars in the Tail of the Great Bear, when 
continued, passes through the ruddy star Arcturus. 

A line from Polaris through the last star (77) in the Tail of the Great 
Bear passes at 30° beyond -q through Arcturus. 

Likewise, the line joining Procyon and Regulus, when extended to the 
eastward, passes through that star. Arcturus, Spica, and the bright star 
P Leonis form an equilateral triangle. 

Canis Major : a Canis Majoris or Sirius. 

A line drawn from Aldebaran through the Belt of Orion passes at about 
20° on the other side through Sirius, the brightest star in the heavens. Sirius, 
Orion's Belt, Aldebaran, and the Pleiades are situated at about equal intervals 
along the same line. Sirius, Betelguese, Rigel, and Aldebaran form a 
magnificent trapezium with Orion's Belt in the centre. 

Capella, Castor, Pollux, Procyon, and Sirius all lie on one great curve. 

P Canis Majoris or Mirzam lies close to Sirius and on the same side of 
Sirius as Rigel. 

6 and 8 Canis Majoris lie to the south of Sirius about twice the distance 
of /i from Sirius, h being nearer to Sirius than e (Adara). 

Canis Minor : a Canis Minoris or Procyon. 

A line drawn from the Twins (Castor and Pollux) to Sirius is almost 
bisected by Procyon, which lies 25° due south of the midpoint between 
Castor and Pollux. 

Sirius, a Orionis, and Procyon form an equilateral triangle with sides of 
about 25°, Procyon being at the eastern angle. 

Cassiopeia : 

This constellation is situated on the opposite side of the Pole to the 
Plough, and at about the same distance from the Pole as the Pointers. Its 
characteristic feature is the ^\'-shaped group contained within it. 

a CassiopeicC or Schedir is the second star of the W, reckoning from right 
to left. 

y Cassiopeia is the centre star of the W. 

Reading from right to left the stars of the W come in the order /i a y 8 e, 
which may be remembered by the word Bagde. 

Centaurus : 

a and /3 Centauri lie not far from the Southern Cross. When the 
Cross is on the meridian, they are situated to its left, and point towards it. 
They are known as the Southern Cross " Pointers," ^ being the nearer of 
the two to the constellation Crux. 



52 NOTES ON THE STARS. 

The constellations Centaurus and Crux lie close together and ft)rm one 
of the most remarkable groups in the southern hemisphere. No difticulty is 
experienced in identifying them. 

6 Centauri, a solitary star, lies due south of Arcturus, and forms a right- 
angled triangle with Spica and a Libra;. A line drawn from € Virginis through 
Spica, and produced rather more than its own length, passes close to it. 

Cetus : /i Ceti. 

A line drawn from Aldebaran through a Ceti (Menkar) passes near four 
stars in Cetus, viz., y, 8, o, 'C, and continued as far again, terminates near 
/? Ceti, the brightest star of the constellation. 

The eastern side of the Square of Pegasus when extended to the south, 
passes io° to the west of it. 

Corona : a Corona or Alphecca. 

A line drawn from 8 of the Great Bear through the last star in the Tail of 
the Great Bear, points to Alphecca, the brightest star of an almost perfect 
semi-circular group called the Northern Crown. It is situated at one-third 
of the distance from Arcturus to Vega. 

Crux : a, ^, and y Crucis. 

The constellation Crux, or the Southern Cross, is about as far from the 
South Pole as the Great Bear is from the North Pole. When the Cross is 
seen erect, a represents the foot, y the head, and the cross beam is represented 
by 8 and /?, fi being the nearer to the bright stars a and /3 Centauri. 

Cygnus : a Cygni or Deneb. 

A line drawn from the Twins (Castor and Pollux) through Polaris and 
extended an equal distance on the other side of the Pole, passes through 
Deneb. It lies about 23° to the east of Vega, and about the same distance 
as this star from Polaris. The constellation is easily recognised by the cross 
that marks it, Deneb being at the top. 

y Cygni marks the intersection of the cross bar with the main piece of 
the cross. It is the centre of what sailors call the " Kite." 

Eridanus : a, Eridani or Achcrnar. 

This is a bright star lying midway between Fomalhaut and Canopus, 
The constellation, which is long and winding, extending as it does from 
5° S. to 60° S., lies to the south of Taurus, in the space between Cetus and 
Orion. 

Gemini : a Geminorum or Castor, ft Geminorum or Polkix. 

The Twins (Castor and Pollux) lie nearly midway between the Great 
Bear and Orion, and are about 4^° apart. A line drawn from Polaris to 
Procyon passes through them ; also a line drawn from Rigel through the 
middle of Orion's Belt strikes them. 

Pollux, the brighter of the two, is farther from Polaris than Castor. 

y Geminorum or Alhena lies about midway between Pollux and Betel- 
guese. 



NOTES ON THE STARS. 53 

Castor, Pollux, and y Gcniinorum form a right-angled triangle, willi the 
right angle at Pollux. 

Grus : a Gruis. 

A line drawn from a Centauri to Fomalhaut passes near a Gruis, which 
is situated about midway between Fomalhaut and a Pavonis. 

Leo : a Leonis or Regulus. 

A line drawn from Polaris by way of the Pointers and continued about 
45° in the same direction from the latter, leads a little to the east of Regulus, 
wliich is almost exactly on the Ecliptic. A line from e Orionis (the middle 
star in Orion's Belt) through Procyon also passes close to it. 

Regulus is placed towards the end of a group of stars shaped like a sickle, 
and has for its " Pointers " 8 and y Ursoe Majoris. 

Lyra : u Lyrae or Vega. 

A line drawn from Polaris at right angles to the line of the Pointers, and 
on the same side as the Great Bear, passes through Vega, which is about the 
same distance as Capella from Polaris. 

A line drawn from Capella midway between Polaris and the well-known 
W-shaped constellation Cassiopeia and extended to rather more than an 
equal distance on the opposite side of Polaris, also passes close to it. 

Vega has two small stars in close proximity, the three forming an equi- 
lateral triangle. 

Ophiuchus : (or Serpentarius). 

a Ophiuchi (or Ras-al-Hague, as it is sometimes called) lies mid- 
way between Vega and Antares, and close to the bright star a Herculis. 
a Ophiuchi, Vega, and Altair form a nearly equilateral triangle. 

Orion : a Orionis or Betelguese. 

This bright star lies at no great distance to the north of the Belt of Orion. 

Betelguese and k Orionis form the left or eastern side of the great 
quadrilateral, Betelguese being the northernmost. 
(3 Orionis or Rigel. 

This fine white star lies to the south of the Belt of Orion, being balanced 
by Betelguese on the other side. 

A line drawn from Polaris through Capella touches Rigel ; also a line 
drawn from Castor through the middle star in Orion's Belt leads directly 
to it. 
y Orionis or Bellatrix. 

A line drawn from the cluster of the Pleiades past Aldebaran leads directly 
to Bellatrix, a star in the left shoulder of Orion. 

Rigel and Bellatrix form the right side of the great quadrilateral, Rigel 
being the southernmost. 

€ Orionis or Alnilam is the middle of the three stars forming the Belt 
of Orion. 

t. Orionis is the southernmost of the three stars forming the Belt of Orion. 



54 NOTES ON THE STARS. 

Pavo : o I'avonis. 

A line drawn from a Centauri to Fomalhaut passes near a Pavonis, which 
is about twice as far from a Centauri as the latter is from a Crucis. 

Perseus : a Persei or Mirfak. 

This star, which is the central one of a row of stars formed like a bow or 
arc, lies in a line with Castor and Capella, and is situated above the well- 
known cluster of the Pleiades. A line drawn from Polaris midway between 
Capella and the well-known W-shaped constellation Cassiopeia leads to it, 
or it may be found by continuing the line of the three principal stars in the 
constellation Andromeda. 

Piscis Australis : a Piscis Australis or Pomalhaut. 

A line drawn from P to a Pegasi, the two stars which form the western 
side of the great Square of Pegasus, and produced about three times the 
distance, passes near Fomalhaut. 

Sagittarius : 

c Sagittarii is about io° nearer the South Pole than Antares, and forms 
a right-angled triangle with that star and Altair, the right angle being at 
€ Sagittarii. 

Scorpio (or Scorpius) : a Scorpii or Antares. 

A line drawn from Regulus through Spica passes at 45° distance through 
the fiery red star, Antares, a star which is almost as far beyond Spica as 
Spica is beyond Regulus. 

Antares, Vega, and Arcturus form a large right-angled triangle, with the 
right angle at Arcturus. 

6 and X Scorpii lie a short distance to the south-east of Antares in the 
Tail of the Scorpion and in the direction of e Sagittarii. 

The stars of this constellation form a conspicuous figure like a large S. 

Taurus : a Tauri or Aldebaran. 

About 25° to the northward of the Belt of Orion, and not far from the 
direction in which it points, is the V-shaped cluster of the Ilyadcs, in which 
lies the red star Aldebaran. A line drawn from Polaris between Capella and 
Mirfak, and on the side of Capella, passes through no great star till it reaches 
Aldebaran. 

Capella, Aldebaran, and Castor form a large isosceles triangle. 

ft Tauri or Nath, to the left of Aldebaran, lies at the extremity of one of 
the horns of the Bull (Taurus). A line drawn from Cajjella to Bellatrix 
passes close to it. 

Triangulum Australe : 

a Trianguli Australis lies near a line drawn from a Centauri to Fomalhaut. 
It is about the same distance from a Centauri as the latter is from a Crucis. 



NOTES ON THE STARS. 55 

Ursa Major: 

The stars comprising the well-known " Plough," which forms part of the 
constellation Ursa Major, are : — 

a Dubhe. 
(3 Merak. 
y Phegda. 
8 Megrez. 
c Alioth. 
^ Mizar. 
7] Benetnasch. 

a and /? are known as the Pointers. 

Ursa Minor : a Ursae Minoris or Polaris. 

A line drawn through /3 and a Urs?e Majoris points directly to Polaris, 
the well-known Pole Star. It is always to be seen in the same part of the 
heavens, and is the last star in a group of seven which bear some resemblance 
to the well-known Plough. 

Virgo : a Virginis or Spica. 

The curve formed by the three stars in the Tail of the Great Bear, when 
continued, passes first through Arcturus and then through Spica ; also a line 
drawn from Polaris through Mizar passes, at about 70° distance, through 
Spica. 

Arcturus, Spica, and Antares form a right-angled triangle, with the right 
angle at Spica. 



PRINTED BY 

NEILL AND COMPANY, Ll.MITF.T), 

EDINBURGH 



LIST OF NAUTICAL WORKS 



PUBLISHED BY 



J. D. POTTER. 



ADMIRALTY CHARTS. 

THE LATEST EDITIONS OF CHARTS, PLANS, AND SAILING DIRECTIONS, 
PUBLISHED BY THE ADMIRALTY, 

CAN BE OBTAINED FROM 

J. D. POTTER, Admiralty Agent (By Appointment), 

145, MINORIES, LONDON, E. 

Branch Establishment -11, KIl^G STREET, TOWER HILL, E. 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE OF CHARTS (380 pages). Is. 
An abridged Catalogue Free on application. 



NOTICE. 



The following is from Lloyd's Calendar, published with 
the approval of the Committee of Lloyd's : — 

" Admiralty Charts. — When issued from the London Chart 
" Agent (J. D. Potter, 145, Minories, E.), the Charts have 
" received all necessary corrections to date. Once out of his 
" hands, there is no guarantee that further corrections are 
" made before sale by local firms at different j)orts, and pur- 
" chasers should obtain some assurance that the Charts are 
" correct to date.^' 

SPECIAL BOARD OF TRADE OEFICIAL NOTICE (No. 9) TO SHIPOWNERS. 

NOTICE TO SHIPOWNERS AND AGENTS. 



The attention of the BOARD OF TRADE has frequently been called to cases in which 
British vessels have been endangered or wrecked through PIASTERS attempting to NAVIGATE 
them by means of ANTIQUATED or otherwise DEFECTIVE CHARTS. 

The BOARD OF TRADE desires, therefore, to direct the especial attention of Shipowners 
and their Servants and Agents to the necessity of seeing that the charts taken or sent on Board 
their Ships are corrected down to the time of sailing. NEGLECT TO SUPPLY a SHIP with 
PROPER CHARTS will be brought prominently before the Court of Inquiry in the event of a 
wreck occurring from that cause. 



LIST OF NAUTICAL WOKKS 

Published by J. D. Potter. 



WORKS ON NAVIGATION AND SEAMANSHIP. 



for 



Navigation Simplified, by a System of Teacliing based on First Principles, 

Officers (from 2nd Mate to Extra Master) in the Mercantile Marine and Yachtsmen. 
Illusti-ated by numerous diag^rams, by Captain F. Thompson, F.R.A.S., Younger 
Brother of the Trinity House, Senior Examiner of Masters and Mates, and Secretary 
to the Local Marine Board of London ... ... ... ... ••. ••• ■•• 1^ ^ 

The Practice of Navigation and Nautical Astronomy, by Lieut. Raper, R.K. 16 o 

Nautical Tables, by Lieut. Raper, R.N 10 6 

Lectures on Elementary Navigation, by Rev. J. B. Harhord, M.A. {Retired 
Naval Instructor, R.N. ; late Inspector of Naval Schools, Admiralty ; Examiner 
in Navigation and Nautical Astronomy jor the Department of Science and Art ; 
Author of " Glossary of Navigation ") ... ... ... ... ••■ ••• •■• ' " 

An Introduction to the Practice of Navigation and Nautical 

/Kstronomy, hy R. E. Hooppell, M. A., F.R.A.S. 3 6 

Navigation, intended for Self-Instruction up to the Second Mate's Examination, by 

William Roy 6 

Modern Seamanship, by J.u.sfm M. Knight, Lieutenant Commander United States 
Navy. With 136 Full Page Plates and 428 Pages of Letterpress. Second Edition.— 
Eevised ^^ 

Seamanship and Navigation, Required for the Ordinary Examination, by Capt. 
R. Maxwell 

Seamanship and Navigation, Required for the Extra Master's Examination, by 
Capt. R. Maxwell ... ... ... ... ... •■• ••• ••• 

Maxwell's Two Books, bound as one volume ••• 2 6 



1 



1 



TIDE CHARTS AND BOOKS. 



Tide Charts of the English and Bristol Channels and entrance of 
the Thames, compiledfrom the Admiralty Tide Tables, hy Algernon Heher Percy, 
late Lieut. Royal Navy ... ... ... ... •■• ••• ••• ••• ••• ^ ^ 

English Channel Tidal Streams, compiled by S. H. Broivn (Trinity Pilot), from 
Official Publications; 12 Diagrams showing every hour "before" and "after," and 
at High Water, Dover, on one card, size 11 by 9 inches ... ... ... ... ■■■ 1 

Nineteen Charts of the Isle of Wight and Solent Tides, from Portland 

Bill to the Owers, by T. B. 0. IFf af 7 6 

The General Direction of the Tidal Streams in the North Sea for 
every Hour "before" and "after," and at High Water, Dover, 

compiled by Com. G. K. Gandy, R.N.R., from Official Publications (on one sheet, 

size 23 by 17 inches) ... ... .. ... ... ... ••■ ••• ••• ••• 1 

The Direction and Rate of the Tidal Streams at every Hour, for 48 
Localities between The Nore and Sciily Isles, compiled from Admiralty 

iiouicea only, by F. Uvicard CuUins ... ... ... ... ■•• ••• ••• 2 

Twelve Charts of the Tidal Streams of the Channel Islands and 

Neighbouring French Coasts, hy F. Howard Collins 4 

The Universal Tidal Ready Reckoner, calculated by Capt. W. E. Hutchinson l 6 



List of Nautical Works published by J. D. POTTER. 

AZIMUTH, CHRONOMETER, EX-MERIDIAN, AND OTHER TABLES. 

s. d. 
Sun's True Bearing, or Azimuth Tables, (30° N. to 30° S.) by J. £. and Percy 

L. H. Davis 10 6 

Davis's "Chronometer" Tables; or, hoar angles for selected altitudes between 
latitudes and 50° with variations for 1' in all elements, by Percy L. H. Davis, 
F.R.A.S 10 G 

Davis's Star Azimuth Tables, computed for intervals of five and ten minutes 
between the Parallels of Latitude 60° North and 60° South, by Percy L. II. 
Davis, F.R.A.S 10 6 

Davis's Ex- Meridian Tables for all latitudes and declination lower than 70° North 
and South (ia firoparation) ... 

Tables for the Reduction of Ex- Meridian Altitudes, by J. T. Toioson, F.R.G.S. 
Tables for facilitating the method of equal Altitudes, by F. A. L. Kitchin, 

B.A., Xaval Inslructor, R.N. ... 
Ex-Meridian Diagram, by J-'. .1. L. Kitchin, B.A., Karul Inatrnctin; R.N. 

A Table of the Principal Stars, with Directions for Recognizing 

Them, hj C. J. Benton 3 

Pole-Star Latitude : a method of Finding the Latitude from an Altitude of the Pole 

Star, hy D<irnton Button {Ma.ster Mariner), B.A., M. Inst. G.E. 1 

Time Azimuth Diagram, by irM(//i Godfray, M.A 3 

Captain Weir's Azimuth Diagram l 

Captains' and Officers' Bridge or Poop Companion. Tables for finding the 

distance of an object at sea by inspection (without the use of pencil or paper), 
at the same time giving the distance the ship will go wide of the object before 
getting to it, and the course to steer to obtain a required distance, by A. Hiitteroth... 2 6 

Speed Tables, for finding the Distance run in a given time at a given speed, between 

the limits of 10 to 18 knots, by /. D. Macpherson (Pacific Steam Navigation Co.) ... 1 

Foreign Measures and their English Values, compiled from Official Sources, 

by R. C. Carrinyton, F.R.G.S. 7 G 

Tables showing the Length in Feet of a Degree, Minute, and 

Second of Latitude and Longitude, with the corresponding number of 
Statute Miles in each Degree of Latitude ; and the number of Minutes of Latitude or 
Nautic Miles contained in a Degree of Longitude, under each Parallel of Latitude, by 
R. C. Carrinyton, F.R.G.S 1 



10 


6 


1 





1 





1 






SAILING DIRECTIONS AND CHARTS FOR THAMES, CHANNEL, &c. 

Concise Navigating Directions for the River Thames, including all the 
Pools, Reaches and Channels, from London Bridge to the South Foreland and 
Orfordness, and for the English Channel to Beachy Head ; also for the Port of 
Dunkerque and the approaches to the Scheldt, by Stephen Penney, Trinity Pilot, 
(7rare.se7uZ (Illustrated by nineteen Charts) ... .. ... ... ... ... 7 G 

East Coast Rivers. Charts and Sailing Directions for the Rivers Roach, Crouch, 
Bhickwatcr, Colne, Stour, Orwell, Debon, Ore and Aide ; together with General 
Ct arts from the Thames to South wold, by S. V. S. C. Messum, Lieut . R.N. ... ... 5 

Pilot's Handbook for the English Channel, containing concise Directions for 

Entering and Navigating the GIkuijioI, and for all the Harbours and Anchorages on 
the English Coast, from the Scilly Islands to the North Foreland ; also Questions on 
the Pilotage of the Channel, by Capt. King, R.N. (with Twenty-two Charts) ... 7 6 

The Solent Chart Book, with sailing directions for all rivers and harbours 

between Selsca and Portland (with Seventeen Charts), by D. B. Kitchin, M.A. ... 5 

A Chart of the Dutch Waterways, by J. & A. B. Powell 4 o 



List of Nautical Works published by J. D. POTTER. 

THE WORKS OP A. C. JOHNSON, R.N. 

s. d. 
Nautical Astronomy Made Easy. AH the Rules being worked by a Small Table 

on One Page, designed to economise Time and Labour ... ... ... ... ... 3 U 

On Findingthe Latitude and Longitude in Cloudy Weather and at other 

times. Greatly enlarged, with A])pendix, and Vnn 11. ... ... ... ... 5 

Short Tables and Rules for Finding Latitude and Longitude, by single 

and Double Altitudes, Pole Star, Lunars, &c. ... ... ... ... ... ... 3 

How to Find the Time at Sea in less than a minute, being a New and 

Accurate Method, with :J|iecially ada))ted Tables ... ... ... ... ... ... 2 6 

The Bearings of the principal bright Stars of greater declination than 23" 
north or 2'6" south ; also those of the Moon and Planets when similarly situated. 
(Published by request) 

A Handbook for Star Double Altitudes, with Directions for selecting the stars 

Hour Angles of the Sun, Moon, and Stars, for Latitude and Declination C-SO", 
and Altitude 5"-64", together with Short Methodsofiinding the Longitude by Chrono- 
meter ; and the Latitude and Longitude by Two " Chronometers " 

Time-Altitudes for Expediting the Calculation of Apparent-Time, &,c. 

Combined Time and Altitude Azimuth Tables, for all Latitudes and 

Declinations ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 2 6 

Short, Accurate, and Comprehensive Altitude-Azimuth Tables to 

show the true bnarinor of the Sun, Moon, Planets, &c., for latitude 0^ to 75° north 
or south ; altitudes 0° to 75° ; and declination 30° north to 80° south, also the 
Approximate Ship Time. (Published by request) ... ... ... ... ... 3 6 



3 





2 


6 


3 


G 


4 






THE WORKS OP CAPT. A. B. BECHER, R.N. 

The Landfall of Columbus on his First Voyage to America, with a Trans- 
lation of The Baron Bounefoux's History of his previous life, also a Chart showing his 
Track from the Landfall to Cuba, and an outline of his subsequent voyages ... ... 12 

Navigation of the Indian Ocean, China, and Australian Seas: with an 
account of the Winds, Weather, and Currents found therein throughout the year (with 
Charts) 5 

Navigation of the Atlantic Ocean, with an account of the Winds, Weather and 

Currents found therein throughout the year (with Charts) ... ... ... ... 5 

Winds and Currents of the Mediterranean, with remarks on its Navigation at 

different Seasons of the Year, compiled from various authorities, chiefly Spanish ... 3 

The Binnacle Compass, Corrected by itself, or the Deviation found with one 

Compass by both methods, and the Corrections applied ... ... ... ... ... 1 

Tables of Mast Head Angles, for five feet intervals, from 30 to 280 feet, and varying 
distances from a cable's length to four miles, with their application to Nautical 
Surveying; also the determination of distance by sound, with an example... ... 2 

The Storm Compass, or Seaman's Hurricane Companion, containing a familiar expla- 
nation of the Hurricane Theory, illustrated with Diagrams and Accounts of Hurricanes 1 

Description of an Artificial Horizon, invented by A. B. Becker, Capt. R.N., with 

examples of its application, afloat and ashore (1857) ... ... ... ... ... 1 O 



TIME, TIDE, AND DISTANCES. 

Time, Tide, and Distances. A handy book of reference for the Shipowner, 
Underwriter, or Travcll(>r. Contains The World's Time compared with Greenwich. 
The Tides round the British Coasts and those from Bergen via the Eastern Eoute 
to Japan with that at London Bridge ; approximate Distances from Home Ports to 
Home and Foreign Ports (over 13,000 references) ; and a Speed and Distance 
Table for Bates of Speed from 8 to 21 knots for distances up to 14,000 nautical 
raileB, hy J. McKirdy, BN.B 15 



6 

List of Nautical Works published by J. D. POTTER. 

NAUTICAL SURVEYING. 

s. d. 
Practical Nautical Surveying and the Handicraft of Navigation, by 

Com. T. A. Hull, R.N. 3 

Practical Observations on Surveying,''(on determining the Position of a Vessel 

when Sounding), by Commander P. F. Shortland, R.N,... ... ... ... ... 1 



THE WOBKS OP REAR-ADMIRAL CHARLES SHADWELL, C.B., P.R.S. 

Notes on the Management of Chronometers and the Measurement of 

Meridian Distances 4 G 

Notes on the Reduction of Lunar Observations, Mathematical and 

Practical 4 6 

Tables for Facilitating the Determination of the Latitude and Time at 

Sea by Observations of the Stars 2 6 

Notes on Interpolation, Mathematical and Practical 2 



SHIPPING LAW BOOKS. 

The Rules of the Road at Sea, comprising the Eegulations for preventing 
collisions at Sea, 1897, and Eules in force in Harbours, Eivers, and Inland Waters ; 
with explanatory notes and observations, by H. Stuart Moore, of the Inner Temple 
and the Adm^iralty Court, Barrister-at-Laio. (Third Edition) ... ... ... ... 7 6 

Diagrams, with Explanations, illustrating the Rule of the Road for 

SalWng Sh'ljpS, by Capt. H. S. Blachhurrie 1 6 

The Statute Law of Merchant Shipping, comprised in an alphabetical analysis, 
and a Summary of the unrepealed Morchant Shipping Acts, from 1821 to 1888, by 
E. G. M. Brotxme, the Admiralty Marshal (1889) 6 

Admiralty Procedure against Merchant Ships and Cargoes, &,c., in the 

High Court of Justice and in County Courts, showing the various matters as to which 
proceedings in Admiralty can be taken, and the mode of commencing action, &c., by 
iJ. G. Bf. Browne, the Admiralty Marshal (1889) 10 

Handbook on the Law and Practice relating to Apprentices to the 

Mercantile Marine Service, by i'. If. Gurd?ier (of the Middle Temple) ... 1 (5 



DEVIATION OP THE COMPASS. 

Elementary Manual for the Deviations of the Compass in Iron 
Ships, intended for the use of Seamen of the Royal Navy and Mercantile Marine, 
and Navigation Schools, by E. W. Creak, C.B., F.R S., retired Captain, R.N. ... ... 6 6 

Handbook to Beall's Compass De\/\ascope,hj Captain George Beall l 6 

Practical Information on the Deviation of the Compass, for the use of 

Masters and Mates of Iron Ships, by J. T. Toivt^on, F.R.G.S. ... ... ... ... 4 

Supplement to the above ; being the Questions on the Deviation of the Compass 
issued by the Board of Trade for the Examination for Masters and Extra Masters' 
Certificates after 1st January, 1895, and Answers to the Questions, by Capt. William 
Mayeii, R.N. 1 6 

Lights in Lyrics, or a Glance at the Channel Lights as Piloting Marks, on a run from 
JScilly to the Nore, accompanied by a parting precept on Com pass Deviation, 
addressed to all younger Mariners. (With a view of the Caskets, Notes and Charts) 
(1859) 1 

The Pocket Compass Corrector 2 o 

Plain Deviation Curve Diagram, by Captain J. C. iiobinson 6 



List of Nautical Works published by J. D. POTTER. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



s. 



Cruise Round the World of the Flying Squadron, 1869-1870, under the command 
of Rcar-Admiral G. T. Phippa Hornhy (illustrated), and Chart showing the Track 
of the Flying Squadron 21 

Track Chart of the World, large scale, mounted on cloth ... ... ... ... 12 

A Chart of South Latitudes, beyond 20 degrees, to Facilitate the Practice of Great 
Circle Sailing ; with an accompanying Diagram for the Determination of the 
Courses and Distances, by fl'Mg'?i C?o(Z/rai/, 31.4. ... ... ... ... 3 

Scales of Latitude from 5' to 60° proportional to a scale of Longi- 
tude, where i in.= one mile, arranged to facilitate the finding of position 
from two Sumner lines, by i^. E. Peafce, yl.lf.I.O.E. per set 5 

Charts to accompany above ... ... ... each 2 6 

Course and Position by Sextant Observations of two known 

Ob\ects, hj Lt.-Col. English, late R.E 6 

A Method for finding the Latitude by the Simultaneous Altitudes 

of Two Stars, hj Capt. Burdwood, R.N. ... ... ... ... ... ... 1 

An Essay on Hydrographical Engineering, as applicable to Floating Sea 
Barriers, Harbours, Batteries, Coast Defences, and Naval Fortifications, by Capt. 
Adderly Sleigh, K.T.S., F.R.S.L. (with Illustrations), 1859 10 

The Causes of Weather and Earthquakes (with four Diagrams) by 

Alfred J. Cooper ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ■■■ ••• 2 

A New Theory of the Stability of Ships, second edition, revised and enlarged, 

(with 28 diagrams), by yll/. J. Cooper ... ... ... ... ... 2 

How Ships are Lost, and How to Save Life and Property at Sea 

(Illustrated), by 17. p. B. Ifanscr 1 

A Voice from the Quarter-Deck on the State of our Mercantile 

Marine, by Josep/i JUai/Tie (Master Mariner) ... ... ... ... ... ... 1 

Remarks on Rigging Ships with Flat Surface Sails, by Lieut. William 

Congalton, R.N.R 2 

A Review of the New Methods of Lowering and Disconnecting 

Boats at Sea, with a proposed Amendment (1857), by Capt. Eynaston, B.N., 
C.B.,&c. 1 6 

Chart of the Sulina Branch of the Danube (European Commission of the 
Danube), surveyed by Robert Hansford, Surveyor of the Commission, under the 
Direction of C. A. Hartley, Engineer in Chief (showing 45 Nautical Miles of the 
River from Sulina), size 10 ft. X 2 ft. 3in. (1860) 20 

Chart of the Navy of Great Britain, from the Earliest Period of 

History, compiled from Historical publications, old records. Parliamentary returns, 

and other authorities, by ii'redencfe PengraZ (of the Admiralty), 1860 ... ... ... 3 6 

Historical Notes on Shipping, by P. L. Isaac {Member of the Institution of 

Naval Architects) ... ... ... ., ... ... ... ... ... ... 1 

Notes on Cherbourg, (Geographical and Historic description of, &c.), and Chart 

(1858), hj Bedford Pirn, Commander R.N.,F.R.G.S I 

The Blue Coat Boys' Clock. A dial showing the simnltaneous time of day at all 

parts of the earth's surface, size 20 X 17 inches ... ... ... ... ... ... 5 

Nautical Dictionary, English, Dutch, French, and German, for the use 

of Captains and Shipowners, by D. J. Boom, Lieut. Dutch Royal Navy ... ... ... 10 

Ship's Cook and Steward's Guide, containing hints for Management, and Two 

Hundred and Fifty Recipes, by James B. Wilson ... ... ... ... ... ... 1 

Light as a Motive Power, a Series of Meteorological Essays (1875), by Lieut. R. 

n.Armit,R.N. 15 

An Address delivered to the Boys of the Training Ships " Chichester " 

and the " Arethusa," by G'. i/. Co.B/iead (1885) 4 



List of Nautical Works published by J. D. POTTER. 



WINDS AND CURRENTS. 



s. d. 



Physical Geography in its Relation to the prevailing Winds and 

Currents, by John Knox Laugliton, M.A. (Mathematical and Xural Instructor at the 
Royal Naval College) 10 6 

The True Principle of the Law of Storms, practically arranged for both 

Hemispheres, by James Sedgwich ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 3 

The True Direction and Velocity of Wind, observed from Ships while Sailing, 

by James N. Miller (Member of the Liverpool Polytechnic Society), with Table for 
Indicating the Trne Direction of the Winds at Sea (1870) ... ... ... ... 6 

The Wind in its Circuits: with the explanation of the Origin and Cause of 
Circular Storms and Equinoctial Gales ; illustrated with numerous Diagrams and a 
Chart of the Prevailing Winds of the World for Spring and Summer, by Lieut. R. H. 
Armit, R.N. (1870) 7 6 

(See also Works by Capt. Becher. R.N., page 5.) 



INTERNATIONAL CODE OP SIGNALS. 

Signal Cards— British System, with Plates, containing Instructions for Sema- 
phoring by Day, and with the Morse Code by Day or Night, together with the 
principal " Urgent " Light or Sound Signals, in accordance with the New Code. 
Also, Sheet of New Code Flags (34 Flags, coloured). Compiled by J. Whitly Dixon 
(Retired Captain, Royal Navy). (Size, 24^ x 19^) ... ... ... ... ... 1 6 

Ditto ditto mounted on thick card 2 



WORK ON SALVAGE. 

Salvage Operations. The floating of H.M. Battleship " Howe." Illustrated by 
23 plans and photographs, by Rear-Admiral G. T. H. Boyes, late Flag Captain H.M.S. 
"Anson" 



INDIAN PORTS. 

From Calcutta to Bombay Coasting, being the Second Edition of the Hand- 
book to the Ports on the Coast of India between Calcutta and Bombay, including 
Ceylon and the Maldivo and Laccadive Islands, with 11 Charts and 12 Photographs, 
by Lieut. H. S. Broivn, R.N.R., Port OlBcer, Marine Department, Madras Presidency 10 



SINGLE-HANDED DIVIDERS (P. Howard Collins's Patent), No. 13999. 

Specially Deaigned. for Navigators. 

The advantages of these Single-handed Dividers are that they can be picked up from the (able 
by one hand alone, and the legs opened or (jlosed by the finger and thumb of the same hand, 
without any assistance whatever. 

Navigators are thus enabled to work, and retain in position, the parallel ruler with one hand, 
while distances are being measured with the other. It is needless to say that this enables much 
time to be saved in laying off courses and distances, a matter for consideration in these days of 
steamers travelling a mile in less than two-and-a-half minutes. 

The joint itself is of an entirely new form, being m.-xde a round ball. This is found to be 
a great advantage, and the best form, for rolling between the thumb and fore-finger when 
" stepping " distances ; as for instance, in measuring fifty miles by the legs being set to ten 
miles of the chart scale. 

These Dividers arc of the best make in German-silver, price 7s. Gd. per pair in cardboard box, 
and with hpecial cleat and screws for fixing to the chart-room bulk-head to hold them when not 
in use. 

" None seem to be quite on a level of excellence with these." — Merchant Service Review. 

" The price is certainly a raasonable one." — The Shipping World, 



UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARY 

Los Angeles 

This book is DUE on the last date stamped below. 







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MAR09 19»7 

DEC 9 1937 



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